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Re: corsets

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  • Wendi
    Hi, I never thought of drapery tape, very interesting. I used the Costume Connection Inc. Early Tudor pattern for my dress. They try to be very accurate.
    Message 1 of 9 , Dec 21, 2007
      Hi,
      I never thought of drapery tape, very interesting.

      I used the Costume Connection Inc. Early Tudor pattern for my dress.
      They try to be very accurate. Either waist styles are fine, but I
      like the waist to come to a point, because I find it more slimming and
      pleasing to my eye. It is also the more common style, unless you are
      in Northern Europe, say Germany, Sweden, Finland, etc. The pleating
      from the back stops several inches before the opening in the center of
      the top skirt to make the sides of the opening lie flat. Use a very
      wide fold to give the opening more weight, some ladies also use a wide
      trim. The opening should reveal the underskirt which is often a
      sumptuous brocade to contrast with a velvet gown, or vis-versa, which
      may be matched to an under-sleeve, should you choose that style.

      There are many wonderful sleeve styles, you know how much I love
      sleeves! My pattern has four different styles and you are welcomed to
      borrow it. Just don't follow the two-colored bodice, Tudor style had
      solid bodices, unless you were say, German and had those nifty laces.

      Remember that you need enough fabric in your underskirt to be able to
      get over your hoop skirt. Since the top skirt is usually split, it's
      not so much of an issue.


      I have a book that Margaret lent me that has lots of amazing pictures
      on Tudor gowns. I'll try to remember to bring the book and my pattern
      to dance practice. I would love to see what kind of underskirt
      material you will use, you could be so dramatic. Here's a trick used
      by many Tudor ladies, only use your sumptuous accent material on the
      part of the underskirt that shows through, the rest is hidden, so can
      be any less expensive fabric. Don't forget the trim around the
      neck-line.

      Gwen.

      --- In EndeweardeTailor@yahoogroups.com, L T <ladybrynmillar@...> wrote:
      >
      > Hi,
      >
      > I'm not that experienced with sewing but I have read
      > about different techniques and pay attention to what
      > people are doing to make ren and italian garb. I've
      > had to figure for myself how to sew based on what I
      > read and try.
      >
      > Here is an example of the drapery tape
      > http://www.beaconfabric.com/vindex.html?cat221.htm
      >
      > It would likely be found in the drapery section of a
      > sewing store.
      >
      > Here are some different types of pleats
      > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pleat
      >
      > Cartridge pleating was used in period (from what I
      > understand).
      >
      > Here is an article on cartridge pleating (by hand)
      > http://www.elizabethancostume.net/cartpleat/
      >
      > and another
      > http://www.extremecostuming.com/articles/cartridgepleating101.html
      >
      > You can see why some people choose to use a modern
      > convenience like drapery tape to have a pleated effect
      > without worrying exactly what type of pleat is used -
      > it gets the job done.
      >
      > I thought it was worth mentioning that short cut
      > sewing trick if it would make it easier for you to
      > decide how to construct your garment. I will probably
      > try using the pleating tape next time I make a
      > gathered skirt if I don't want to try cartridge
      > pleating by hand.
      >
      > Bryn
      >
      > --- Cate <kelley@...> wrote:
      >
      > > I was looking at some by Holbein and others of King
      > > Henry's
      > > daughters and wives.
      > >
      > > Your skill at sewing far exceeds mine. I need a
      > > dictionary just to
      > > understand what you're referring to, Bryn. I have
      > > to keep it very
      > > simple, but thanks. :-)
      > > Cate
      >
      >
      >
      >
      ____________________________________________________________________________________
      > Never miss a thing. Make Yahoo your home page.
      > http://www.yahoo.com/r/hs
      >
    • Cate
      It would be intersting to see the book - more pictures never hurts - and I like your suggestion about minimizing the amount of nice fabric needed for the
      Message 2 of 9 , Dec 21, 2007
        It would be intersting to see the book - more pictures never hurts -
        and I like your suggestion about minimizing the amount of "nice"
        fabric needed for the underskirt, that helps, too.

        I hope you have fun singing on Sunday - it sounds like it will be
        neat.
        Cate

        --- In EndeweardeTailor@yahoogroups.com, "Wendi"
        <lobster_kelaguen@...> wrote:
        >
        > Hi,
        > I never thought of drapery tape, very interesting.
        >
        > I used the Costume Connection Inc. Early Tudor pattern for my
        dress.
        > They try to be very accurate. Either waist styles are fine, but I
        > like the waist to come to a point, because I find it more slimming
        and
        > pleasing to my eye. It is also the more common style, unless you
        are
        > in Northern Europe, say Germany, Sweden, Finland, etc. The pleating
        > from the back stops several inches before the opening in the center
        of
        > the top skirt to make the sides of the opening lie flat. Use a very
        > wide fold to give the opening more weight, some ladies also use a
        wide
        > trim. The opening should reveal the underskirt which is often a
        > sumptuous brocade to contrast with a velvet gown, or vis-versa,
        which
        > may be matched to an under-sleeve, should you choose that style.
        >
        > There are many wonderful sleeve styles, you know how much I love
        > sleeves! My pattern has four different styles and you are welcomed
        to
        > borrow it. Just don't follow the two-colored bodice, Tudor style
        had
        > solid bodices, unless you were say, German and had those nifty
        laces.
        >
        > Remember that you need enough fabric in your underskirt to be able
        to
        > get over your hoop skirt. Since the top skirt is usually split,
        it's
        > not so much of an issue.
        >
        >
        > I have a book that Margaret lent me that has lots of amazing
        pictures
        > on Tudor gowns. I'll try to remember to bring the book and my
        pattern
        > to dance practice. I would love to see what kind of underskirt
        > material you will use, you could be so dramatic. Here's a trick
        used
        > by many Tudor ladies, only use your sumptuous accent material on the
        > part of the underskirt that shows through, the rest is hidden, so
        can
        > be any less expensive fabric. Don't forget the trim around the
        > neck-line.
        >
        > Gwen.
        >
        > --- In EndeweardeTailor@yahoogroups.com, L T <ladybrynmillar@>
        wrote:
        > >
        > > Hi,
        > >
        > > I'm not that experienced with sewing but I have read
        > > about different techniques and pay attention to what
        > > people are doing to make ren and italian garb. I've
        > > had to figure for myself how to sew based on what I
        > > read and try.
        > >
        > > Here is an example of the drapery tape
        > > http://www.beaconfabric.com/vindex.html?cat221.htm
        > >
        > > It would likely be found in the drapery section of a
        > > sewing store.
        > >
        > > Here are some different types of pleats
        > > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pleat
        > >
        > > Cartridge pleating was used in period (from what I
        > > understand).
        > >
        > > Here is an article on cartridge pleating (by hand)
        > > http://www.elizabethancostume.net/cartpleat/
        > >
        > > and another
        > > http://www.extremecostuming.com/articles/cartridgepleating101.html
        > >
        > > You can see why some people choose to use a modern
        > > convenience like drapery tape to have a pleated effect
        > > without worrying exactly what type of pleat is used -
        > > it gets the job done.
        > >
        > > I thought it was worth mentioning that short cut
        > > sewing trick if it would make it easier for you to
        > > decide how to construct your garment. I will probably
        > > try using the pleating tape next time I make a
        > > gathered skirt if I don't want to try cartridge
        > > pleating by hand.
        > >
        > > Bryn
        > >
        > > --- Cate <kelley@> wrote:
        > >
        > > > I was looking at some by Holbein and others of King
        > > > Henry's
        > > > daughters and wives.
        > > >
        > > > Your skill at sewing far exceeds mine. I need a
        > > > dictionary just to
        > > > understand what you're referring to, Bryn. I have
        > > > to keep it very
        > > > simple, but thanks. :-)
        > > > Cate
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        >
        ______________________________________________________________________
        ______________
        > > Never miss a thing. Make Yahoo your home page.
        > > http://www.yahoo.com/r/hs
        > >
        >
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