Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Blues style books?????

Expand Messages
  • Rob
    I ve been listening to that YouTube clip of Ida Cox and Jesse Crump (just found out they were married), and am hypnotized by his piano playing. I don t know
    Message 1 of 4 , Jun 1, 2008
    • 0 Attachment
      I've been listening to that YouTube clip of Ida Cox and Jesse Crump
      (just found out they were married), and am hypnotized by his piano
      playing. I don't know anybody alive today who sounds like that,
      although Brad Kay can come real close.
      Does anybody know of any instuction books that teach that style of
      blues playing? I've got books that teach how to play breaks, fills,
      stride, ragtime, Tatum, etc. but I have yet to see a book that
      teaches the style of blues piano like Jesse Crump plays. I realise
      it's 100% improvising, but I thought there might be something out
      there to get me started.
      Bb
    • Todd Robbins
      Bob, Jesse s style boils down to a boogie woogie right hand over a stride/swing left hand. If you take what was standard blues right hand and fill out the
      Message 2 of 4 , Jun 1, 2008
      • 0 Attachment
        Bob,
        Jesse's style boils down to a boogie woogie right hand over a
        stride/swing left hand. If you take what was standard blues right
        hand and fill out the left hand, you have the style.

        Todd

        --- In EliteSyncopations@yahoogroups.com, "Rob"
        <yosemitewriter27@...> wrote:
        >
        > I've been listening to that YouTube clip of Ida Cox and Jesse Crump
        > (just found out they were married), and am hypnotized by his piano
        > playing. I don't know anybody alive today who sounds like that,
        > although Brad Kay can come real close.
        > Does anybody know of any instuction books that teach that style
        of
        > blues playing? I've got books that teach how to play breaks,
        fills,
        > stride, ragtime, Tatum, etc. but I have yet to see a book that
        > teaches the style of blues piano like Jesse Crump plays. I realise
        > it's 100% improvising, but I thought there might be something out
        > there to get me started.
        > Bb
        >
      • rag1916
        I ve long wanted to write a book teaching the rhythm piano style of Jimmy Blythe, Clarence Johnson, etc. but I think I ll have to wait till my music degree :)
        Message 3 of 4 , Jun 2, 2008
        • 0 Attachment
          I've long wanted to write a book teaching the rhythm piano style of
          Jimmy Blythe, Clarence Johnson, etc. but I think I'll have to
          wait 'till my music degree :)

          P.S. I think it's time someone wrote a nice novelty piano instructor as
          well, drawing on all the old instruction books (Confrey, Bloom, Sims,
          Lopez/Smock, Waterman, Christensen etc.) as well as transcriptions of
          old and recent recordings demonstrating how it is supposed to sound.
          This is a massive undertaking and requires a quite solid musical basis
          and thorough knowledge of the musical era, rather than a lot of
          conjecture and narrow-mindedness.

          P.P.S. I wanted to write a stride instructor too, to complete the trio,
          but it seems Riccardo Scivales has beaten me to it in his several
          books, managing to deprecate some of my favorite genres along the way.

          -Andrew


          --- In EliteSyncopations@yahoogroups.com, "Rob" <yosemitewriter27@...>
          wrote:
          >
          > I've been listening to that YouTube clip of Ida Cox and Jesse Crump
          > (just found out they were married), and am hypnotized by his piano
          > playing. I don't know anybody alive today who sounds like that,
          > although Brad Kay can come real close.
          > Does anybody know of any instuction books that teach that style
          of
          > blues playing? I've got books that teach how to play breaks, fills,
          > stride, ragtime, Tatum, etc. but I have yet to see a book that
          > teaches the style of blues piano like Jesse Crump plays. I realise
          > it's 100% improvising, but I thought there might be something out
          > there to get me started.
          > Bb
          >
        • rag1916
          Well, in that example, yes. However in the earlier Mr. Crump s Rag of 1923, it is markedly different. You will notice the inclusion of novelty breaks, a more
          Message 4 of 4 , Jun 2, 2008
          • 0 Attachment
            Well,

            in that example, yes. However in the earlier "Mr. Crump's Rag" of
            1923, it is markedly different. You will notice the inclusion of
            novelty breaks, a more varied left hand part, a somewhat different
            melodic sense, etc. etc.

            Most boogie-woogie pianists I've heard today (Rob Rio, etc.) tend to
            base their whole style on a few cliche'd, repetitive patterns and
            phrases in each hand. Many of these patterns (especially the right-
            hand phrasing) first appeared in the 1930's and '40's with the first
            big boogie-woogie craze.

            The left hand patterns, however (except for a few), managed to appear
            a decade or more earlier in the 'teens and '20's, often on player
            piano rolls, and somewhat less often on records of the period (I have
            no idea why).

            If you listen to some of Jimmy Blythe's most diverse performances
            (Farm House Blues, Alley Rat, etc.), you will note a great deal of
            different left-hand figurations, and also if you listen harder, you
            will note that what he plays in the right hand is less based on
            repetitive figures and more on a strong melodic sense; quite
            different from the familiar Earl Hines/Louis Armstrong melodic sense,
            but still important.

            This is something that I hear more and more the more recordings of
            his, his co-horts, and unwitting stylistic companions I listen to. It
            is almost a whole lost blues and ragtime vernacular, probably because
            most of the festival performers at "blues" festivals today only
            listen to a handful of more recent, 1930's and up blues performers,
            and the focus has been shifting from the piano more and more to the
            guitar, probably because that is the popular instrument of "the
            moment".

            Carl "Sonny" Leyland is one of the few recent blues performers I can
            name who sounds truly authentic, in-tune with the heritage of the
            music, and who actually seems to grow tired of the same few figures
            over and over again, which may be why he has branched out to play in
            so many different styles.

            I am not putting down some of the boogie greats of the '30's (Jimmy
            Yancey, Albert Ammons, etc), but I am trying to point out that it
            seems like too many recent "blues" piano musicians sound like they're
            trying to be carbon-copies of just that handful (or a later handful)
            of blues musicians, much like too many modern jazz saxophonists all
            want to be John Coltrane.

            Copping a lick or two here and there is alright, as is even emulating
            someone else's style for a chorus or more. (Dick Hyman has done it
            quite sucessfully). However, unless for some reason they hate all
            prior and subsequent artists in that genre, one should pay respects
            to the earliest roots of the music and it's offshoots, as well as
            later developments and the well-worn "golden age" stuff. That goes
            for any genre of music.

            It is equally important to try to create your own style, sometimes
            just by shutting yourself off from all recordings, etc. for days and
            just noodling at the piano until you find things that strike your
            fancy. I'm sure that's how some of the earlier piano greats made some
            of their most original stuff. It was more than just copping a bunch
            of licks from a multitude of unrecorded, obscure players. So, that is
            how James P. Johnson retains his own stylistic unity, rather than
            sounding like a conglomeration of discerible earlier personal styles.

            -Andrew

            --- In EliteSyncopations@yahoogroups.com, "Todd Robbins"
            <coneyislandtodd@...> wrote:
            >
            > Bob,
            > Jesse's style boils down to a boogie woogie right hand over a
            > stride/swing left hand. If you take what was standard blues right
            > hand and fill out the left hand, you have the style.
            >
            > Todd
            >
            > --- In EliteSyncopations@yahoogroups.com, "Rob"
            > <yosemitewriter27@> wrote:
            > >
            > > I've been listening to that YouTube clip of Ida Cox and Jesse
            Crump
            > > (just found out they were married), and am hypnotized by his
            piano
            > > playing. I don't know anybody alive today who sounds like that,
            > > although Brad Kay can come real close.
            > > Does anybody know of any instuction books that teach that
            style
            > of
            > > blues playing? I've got books that teach how to play breaks,
            > fills,
            > > stride, ragtime, Tatum, etc. but I have yet to see a book that
            > > teaches the style of blues piano like Jesse Crump plays. I
            realise
            > > it's 100% improvising, but I thought there might be something out
            > > there to get me started.
            > > Bb
            > >
            >
          Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.