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Re: [EliteSyncopations] Re: Cleopha-March or Rag?

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  • Marcello Piras
    Yes, this has been known for decades. Generally, the explanation offered is, ³The Conductor² was the original title, then it was changed at the eleventh hour
    Message 1 of 14 , Feb 12 5:50 PM
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      Yes, this has been known for decades. Generally, the explanation offered is, “The Conductor” was the original title, then it was changed at the eleventh hour and somebody forgot to change it at the bottom of each page. I have tried to find who Cleopha was, with hardly any result, and Perfessor Bill tried harder than I, if I remember (there must have been a thread on this some time ago), still with virtually no result. The piece is clearly “orchestrated” as you play it on the keyboard—you hear trumpets, piccolo, tuba, a solo clarinet, etc.

      Arthur Pryor allegedly played the piece quite soon (don’t remember verse & chapter now). I wonder whether he was the original dedicatee.

      Marcello



      El 12/02/13 19:42, "johnk570" <johnk570@...> escribió:

       

      This is probably old news to most of you Joplin scholars, but I found something pretty interesting while replaying the piece. On the bottom of the pages, you can see the little thingy that says "Title-pg. x". Sometimes, there is a disparity between the title page and the inside, but on Cleopha, you can plainly see that it says "The Conductor-x" on the bottom, instead of "Cleopha-x". Honestly, "The Conductor" seems much more fitting than "Cleopha"-the first strains call to mind a call-and-response between the brass/drum/percussion and the strings/flutes much more than....a hippy lady in a wildflower patch.

      You can see it here, and in NYPL's Complete/Collected Works of Scott Joplin
      http://digital.library.msstate.edu/cdm/ref/collection/SheetMusic/id/23913

      Anyone know why there's two different titles? My guess is that "The Conductor" is the name Joplin gave it, but the publisher changed it, either to cash in on a fad of woman-named rags/marches (ie: Leola, Ophelia, etc.), or to please a woman (yeah yeah, that's what she said) that the publisher knew named Cleopha.

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