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Re: [Electronics_101] Re:"cost reduction is king"

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  • James Liddle
    In a previous life, before Disney & before downsizing, I was a video systems designer for ABC. We had a saying that There s never enough money to do it
    Message 1 of 18 , Mar 2, 2004
      In a previous life, before Disney & before downsizing,
      I was a video systems designer for ABC. We had a
      saying that "There's never enough money to do it
      right, but there's always enough money to fix it
      later". Eventually the system (control room, intercom
      system, truck) worked properly, but it was
      frustrating. Now however, with outsourcing produced
      projects, you'd better get it right the first time,
      because that's the way it's going to be. The cost is
      lower, but so is the usability & reliability.



      --- peter tremewen <Ptremewe@...> wrote:
      > The problem with the "cost reduction is
      > king" approach I have always found, is that when it
      > eventually does fail, you are the one who wears the
      > blame for the fault. Clients don't wont to know that
      > it broke down cause they didn't want to pay a few
      > extra dollars for surge protection. Whenever a
      > client comes up to me and says "I can get it cheaper
      > down at blah, Blah" I simply tell them that I sell
      > middle of the range equipment and that the slight
      > extra expense is worth it when you consider the cost
      > of break down. I consider the few clients I loose
      > because of this are just not worth the trouble they
      > will cause latter...... When I am asked to do so, I
      > have a reputation for producing reasonable quality
      > reliable equipment..... Most people, especially
      > those who I have previously dealt with, are willing
      > to pay just a little bit more for that I have
      > found......
      >
      > The Sinister Dragon
      >
      > Of COURSE surge protection, and a gazillion other
      > things besides, are in
      > order. But in most industrial environments, cost
      > reduction is king, and the
      > bean counters in the front office get to say which
      > costs get "reducted" and
      > which don't.
      >
      > In other words, that's why we sub a few .10
      > 1N4007s into circuits, and have
      > quit trying (except for a few notable cases) to
      > sell large-scale protection
      > to most industrial clients. They just aren't
      > interested.
      >
      > -DM
      >
      >
      >

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    • manifold
      ... For general rectification of up to an Amp, with no special requirements, I also use the 1n400x family. I have some generic 3A diodes in a power supply and
      Message 2 of 18 , Mar 2, 2004
        --- In Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com, "Flux" <bene-tam@d...> wrote:
        > I know that using 4 diodes can do that
        >
        > but can anyone give an example and point out what I shoudl take care
        > during the selection of the components(e.g. specification, model,
        > type....)
        >
        > Thanks

        For general rectification of up to an Amp, with no special
        requirements, I also use the 1n400x family. I have some generic 3A
        diodes in a power supply and a 25A, 50PIV bridge module in another
        power supply.

        There are special cases where special diode selection is important.
        For example, if you are rectifying very low voltages, you may want to
        use low forward voltage diodes like Schottky diodes. There are also
        alternative devices for noise reduction. Yes, a standard rectifier can
        generate enough noise to keep a device from passing FCC requirements.

        These alternatives are more expensive than either regular diodes in a
        bridge circuit, or bridge modules.
      • Roy J. Tellason
        ... Now here we differ. Those parts are rated at 1A as an absolute maximum rating , and I surely wouldn t use them for up to an amp , maybe use them in
        Message 3 of 18 , Mar 3, 2004
          On Wednesday 03 March 2004 12:01 am, manifold wrote:
          > --- In Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com, "Flux" <bene-tam@d...> wrote:
          > > I know that using 4 diodes can do that
          > >
          > > but can anyone give an example and point out what I shoudl take care
          > > during the selection of the components(e.g. specification, model,
          > > type....)
          > >
          > > Thanks
          >
          > For general rectification of up to an Amp, with no special
          > requirements, I also use the 1n400x family.

          Now here we differ. Those parts are rated at 1A as an "absolute maximum
          rating", and I surely wouldn't use them for "up to an amp", maybe use them
          in stuff that would go to half or three-quarters of an amp at most. You
          really do need to leave some safety margin there.

          > I have some generic 3A diodes in a power supply and a 25A, 50PIV bridge
          > module in another power supply.

          For a power supply that might go "up to an amp" I'd be using the 3A parts.

          > There are special cases where special diode selection is important.
          > For example, if you are rectifying very low voltages, you may want to
          > use low forward voltage diodes like Schottky diodes.

          Or fairly high currents. The lower voltage drop means they run cooler, and
          are therefore more efficient. Which means less heat. They're commonly used
          in computer power supplies, among other places.
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