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Xprotolab - inexpensive - mini - O-scopes

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  • A6intruder@myo-p.com
    Have any of you guys used any of these small, fairly inexpensive O-scopes yet? Some are meant to be incorporated right on your breadboard other models are
    Message 1 of 7 , Jun 3, 2014
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      Have any of you guys used any of these small, fairly inexpensive O-scopes
      yet? Some are meant to be incorporated right on your breadboard other
      models are portable scopes that can connect to your PC.

      http://www.jameco.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/ProductDisplay?langId=-1&sto
      reId=10001&productId=2205923&catalogId=10001

      About 10 years ago when I was working on some projects, one of these would
      have been real helpful.

      I briefly read through the manual but I couldn't tell if they would display
      very low frequency say 4Hz (yes, four hz).

      Curious to hear anyone's experience with these.

      Thanks,

      Dan Nicoson
    • Stefan Trethan
      I think the user interface on this device is so piss poor it might as well not be there and you would be better off with a PC based instrument such as the
      Message 2 of 7 , Jun 3, 2014
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        I think the user interface on this device is so piss poor it might as
        well not be there and you would be better off with a PC based
        instrument such as the Analog Discovery from Digilent.

        These devices do not compare to a real scope in terms of frequency
        response, sampling rate, input attenuator etc. but on the plus side
        you get PC processing power and the AWG/scope can be linked in
        interesting ways to make low frequency network analyzers.

        A real scope is a real scope, and will be way better. But these things
        are better than flying blind.

        There are a few parameters I would use to judge these PC based low cost scopes:

        A) Input range. What is the smallest and largest signal you can measure.
        Does it have an input stage compatible with x10 x100 BNC scope probes?
        Is the input protected against overload?

        B) Sampling frequency (single shot / real time) and ADC number of
        bits, analog bandwidth.
        For a lot of stuff you don't need all that much speed, but more bits
        are always nice.

        C) Software convenience.

        D) Added value (digital logic analyzer, AWG outputs).
        Especially the network analyzer mode and spectrum analyzer may be very useful.

        ST


        On Tue, Jun 3, 2014 at 7:04 PM, 'A6intruder@...'
        A6intruder@... [Electronics_101]
        <Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com> wrote:
        > Have any of you guys used any of these small, fairly inexpensive O-scopes
        > yet? Some are meant to be incorporated right on your breadboard other
        > models are portable scopes that can connect to your PC.
        >
        > http://www.jameco.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/ProductDisplay?langId=-1&sto
        > reId=10001&productId=2205923&catalogId=10001
        >
        > About 10 years ago when I was working on some projects, one of these would
        > have been real helpful.
        >
        > I briefly read through the manual but I couldn't tell if they would display
        > very low frequency say 4Hz (yes, four hz).
        >
        > Curious to hear anyone's experience with these.
        >
        > Thanks,
        >
        > Dan Nicoson
        >
        >
        >
        > ------------------------------------
        > Posted by: "A6intruder@..." <a6intruder@...>
        > ------------------------------------
        >
        > Please trim excess when replyingYahoo Groups Links
        >
        >
        >
      • Jong Kung
        For a regular scope work, I would say go with real scope. But I would think one of these attached to the circuit board so a user can quickly assess a signal /
        Message 3 of 7 , Jun 3, 2014
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          For a regular scope work, I would say go with real scope.

          But I would think one of these attached to the circuit board so a user can quickly assess a signal / no signal condition during use would be helpful. Imagine a stage setup where things are connected and disconnected all the time. During setup / performance, a user can have these things already assembled on a circuit / panel and quickly diagnose if it is getting ANY signal.

          Maybe use one of these in addition to simple DMM for non-EE for quick diagnose of signal / no signal condition on site. I can imagine an audio engineer carrying one - so he can quickly assess the problem. As ST said, it's probably better than flying blind.

          I don't know what an audio engineers do day to day. I'm just trying to draw a picture where one of these might come in handy.

          =====

          The bandwidth spec on that unit is very limited. It doesn't even break 1 MHz. A beginner might find it useful for very simple circuit (blinking led lights, 555 circuit, etc.). But the beginner will quickly outgrow this usefulness.

          Just my opinion.


          Jong



          On Jun 3, 2014, at 7:04 AM, "'A6intruder@...' A6intruder@... [Electronics_101]" <Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

          > Have any of you guys used any of these small, fairly inexpensive O-scopes
          > yet? Some are meant to be incorporated right on your breadboard other
          > models are portable scopes that can connect to your PC.
          >
          > http://www.jameco.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/ProductDisplay?langId=-1&sto
          > reId=10001&productId=2205923&catalogId=10001
          >
          > About 10 years ago when I was working on some projects, one of these would
          > have been real helpful.
          >
          > I briefly read through the manual but I couldn't tell if they would display
          > very low frequency say 4Hz (yes, four hz).
          >
          > Curious to hear anyone's experience with these.
          >
          > Thanks,
          >
          > Dan Nicoson
          >
          >
          >
          > ------------------------------------
          > Posted by: "A6intruder@..." <a6intruder@...>
          > ------------------------------------
          >
          > Please trim excess when replyingYahoo Groups Links
          >
          >
          >
        • Andy
          Many years ago I remember drooling over a handheld scope that would easily fit in a briefcase or a coat pocket. It was a real oscilloscope with about a 1
          Message 4 of 7 , Jun 3, 2014
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            Many years ago I remember drooling over a handheld 'scope that would easily fit in a briefcase or a coat pocket.  It was a real oscilloscope with about a 1 inch CRT screen, minuscule by the day's standards.  The company making them was Nonlinear Systems (I think).  Later (1980s?), the same company started making a line of CP/M portable (luggable) personal computers that were very popular, and changed their name to Kaypro.

            Note that the Xprotolab "scope" here has only a 200 kHz bandwidth.  Not only does it not break 1 MHz, it can't even reach 1 MHz.  But it's probably OK for audio-only uses.

            There is a place for every piece of test equipment.  Be careful when considering your possible uses for any item.  Once you have it, your needs will quite possibly grow, and you ought to get something that outlives your *current* requirements.

            Don't fall for the first thing that catches your eye.  Spend some time looking around, checking everything that's out there.

            Andy


          • Howard Hansen
            Hello Dan, I think the Xprotolab Plain version of the Xprotolab oscilloscope is a lot more interesting than the version you provided a link to. The Xprotolab
            Message 5 of 7 , Jun 3, 2014
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              Hello Dan,

              I think the Xprotolab Plain version of the Xprotolab oscilloscope is a lot more interesting than the version you provided a link to.  The Xprotolab Plain version has similar specifications to the $100 version. But it uses a PC for display and is a USB oscilloscope.  I have never used one but think it would be handy for debugging ARduino projects as it can plug into a breadboard. See:
              <http://www.jameco.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/ProductDisplay?langId=-1&storeId=10001&productId=2205940&catalogId=10001>

              The other Howard


              On 6/3/2014 12:04 PM, 'A6intruder@...' A6intruder@... [Electronics_101] wrote:
               

              Have any of you guys used any of these small, fairly inexpensive O-scopes
              yet? Some are meant to be incorporated right on your breadboard other
              models are portable scopes that can connect to your PC.

              http://www.jameco.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/ProductDisplay?langId=-1&sto
              reId=10001&productId=2205923&catalogId=10001

              About 10 years ago when I was working on some projects, one of these would
              have been real helpful.

              I briefly read through the manual but I couldn't tell if they would display
              very low frequency say 4Hz (yes, four hz).

              Curious to hear anyone's experience with these.

              Thanks,

              Dan Nicoson


            • A6intruder@myo-p.com
              Howard, Yes, that was the one I was thinking of. Back when I was building injector driver circuits for my car I had to work with very low frequencies (4-50+
              Message 6 of 7 , Jun 3, 2014
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                Howard,

                 

                Yes, that was the one I was thinking of.  Back when I was building injector driver circuits for my car I had to work with very low frequencies (4-50+ Hz) and my old Panasonic scope didn’t like the very low frequency, it liked 10Hz or better so mostly I didn’t have a problem until working on idle situations.

                 

                I don’t have time to tinker these days but I would be looking at this if I was tinkering these days.

                 

                Thanks,

                 

                Dan

                 

                From: Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com]
                Sent: Tuesday, June 03, 2014 3:28 PM
                To: Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com
                Subject: Re: [Electronics_101] Xprotolab - inexpensive - mini - O-scopes

                 




                Hello Dan,

                I think the Xprotolab Plain version of the Xprotolab oscilloscope is a lot more interesting than the version you provided a link to.  The Xprotolab Plain version has similar specifications to the $100 version. But it uses a PC for display and is a USB oscilloscope.  I have never used one but think it would be handy for debugging ARduino projects as it can plug into a breadboard. See:
                <http://www.jameco.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/ProductDisplay?langId=-1&storeId=10001&productId=2205940&catalogId=10001>

                The other Howard


                On 6/3/2014 12:04 PM, 'A6intruder@...' A6intruder@... [Electronics_101] wrote:

                 

                Have any of you guys used any of these small, fairly inexpensive O-scopes
                yet? Some are meant to be incorporated right on your breadboard other
                models are portable scopes that can connect to your PC.

                http://www.jameco.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/ProductDisplay?langId=-1&sto
                reId=10001&productId=2205923&catalogId=10001

                About 10 years ago when I was working on some projects, one of these would
                have been real helpful.

                I briefly read through the manual but I couldn't tell if they would display
                very low frequency say 4Hz (yes, four hz).

                Curious to hear anyone's experience with these.

                Thanks,

                Dan Nicoson





              • rtstofer
                For the cost, that Xprotolab Plain would be worth playing with. I could see building this board into my new Analog Computer since 2 channels and an external
                Message 7 of 7 , Jun 3, 2014
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                  For the cost, that Xprotolab Plain would be worth playing with.  I could see building this board into my new Analog Computer since 2 channels and an external trigger are all I need (but I am looking a 4 channel scopes).  At the moment, I am using my Digilent Discovery and it does a fine job but maybe a simple built-in board is all I need.

                   

                  I think I'll give it a try at some point.  I need to be certain it will contain enough data points to accurately represent a 1 second integration period.

                   

                  Richard


                   

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