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Universal motor speed control as hotplate input control?

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  • roger_retro
    I would like to have variable control of the output of a counter-top 600 watt distiller heater element (to about half), as a means of temperature control. Is
    Message 1 of 20 , May 20, 2014
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      I would like to have variable control of the output of a counter-top 600 watt distiller heater element (to about half), as a means of temperature control. Is it possible to use a cheap universal motor speed controller for this purpose? I'm not electrically very literate, nor familiar with speed control circuitry, so think I better ask before letting smoke and sparks fly...
      Thanks,
      Roger


    • indago
      You could use one of these if your heater is strictly resistive: http://tinyurl.com/ptowht6 ... You could use one of these if your heater is strictly
      Message 2 of 20 , May 20, 2014
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        You could use one of these if your heater is strictly resistive:

        http://tinyurl.com/ptowht6


        From: "Roger.Blair@... [Electronics_101]" <Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com>
        To: Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Tuesday, May 20, 2014 10:50 PM
        Subject: [Electronics_101] Universal motor speed control as hotplate input control?

         
        I would like to have variable control of the output of a counter-top 600 watt distiller heater element (to about half), as a means of temperature control. Is it possible to use a cheap universal motor speed controller for this purpose? I'm not electrically very literate, nor familiar with speed control circuitry, so think I better ask before letting smoke and sparks fly...
        Thanks,
        Roger



      • Roger Blair
        Thanks for that... I had thought about using a dimmer, but since I already have a speed control, I m hoping to use it if it s suitable to the task... Roger  
        Message 3 of 20 , May 20, 2014
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          Thanks for that... I had thought about using a dimmer, but since I already have a speed control, I'm hoping to use it if it's suitable to the task...
          Roger
           
          On 5/20/2014 9:02 PM, indago indago@... [Electronics_101] wrote:
        • indago
          The one I indicated is rated for 1000 watts.  You had indicated that the item you were going to use it on was a 600 watt load.  Make sure that your motor
          Message 4 of 20 , May 21, 2014
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            The one I indicated is rated for 1000 watts.  You had indicated that the item you were going to use it on was a 600 watt load.  Make sure that your motor speed control is rated for 1000 watts or more so that it doesn't burn out on full load.  When the triac is on full, it will get quite warm, even hot to the touch.  You mentioned that you would be using it on about half.  In this case, the triac will will not get as hot.


            From: "Roger Blair Roger.Blair@... [Electronics_101]" <Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com>
            To: Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Wednesday, May 21, 2014 12:15 AM
            Subject: Re: [Electronics_101] Universal motor speed control as hotplate input control?

             
            Thanks for that... I had thought about using a dimmer, but since I already have a speed control, I'm hoping to use it if it's suitable to the task...
            Roger
             
            On 5/20/2014 9:02 PM, indago indago@... [Electronics_101] wrote:


          • Roger Blair
            The speed control I have is rated 120V 15A, so with 1800W max to draw from, 250-450W appears to be a reasonable load for it. I ll give it a try. Thanks for the
            Message 5 of 20 , May 21, 2014
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              The speed control I have is rated 120V 15A, so with 1800W max to draw from, 250-450W appears to be a reasonable load for it. I'll give it a try.
              Thanks for the help...
              Roger

              On 5/21/2014 2:53 AM, indago indago@... [Electronics_101] wrote:
               
              The one I indicated is rated for 1000 watts.  You had indicated that the item you were going to use it on was a 600 watt load.  Make sure that your motor speed control is rated for 1000 watts or more so that it doesn't burn out on full load.  When the triac is on full, it will get quite warm, even hot to the touch.  You mentioned that you would be using it on about half.  In this case, the triac will will not get as hot.
            • Gooey Tarballs
              What about using a temperature control power cord from an old griddle? Just a thought as they are generally available at the Salvation Army, Goodwill, Habitat
              Message 6 of 20 , May 25, 2014
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                What about using a temperature control power cord from an old griddle?
                 
                Just a thought as they are generally available at the Salvation Army, Goodwill, Habitat ReStores etc. when the surface of the grill gets old and scratched up.
                 
                Generally, the temperature sensing element is a quarter-inch round piece that, liberated from the plastic plastic, (would seem to me) could be fit into another device by simply drilling  a two-inch long hole of the appropriate diameter into some point on the target device and running the connecting wires back to a convenient place to mount the dial control.
                 
                I've saved a couple of these to use to keep the water from freezing before the chickens can drink it.

                "Question with boldness even the existence of a God; because, if there be one, He must more approve of the homage of reason, than that of blind faith" Thomas Jefferson
              • Roger Blair
                Gooey, that is an excellent suggestion! Good thinking... Thanks, Roger On 5/25/2014 8:37 AM, Gooey Tarballs gooeytarballs@gmail.com [Electronics_101] wrote:
                Message 7 of 20 , May 25, 2014
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                  Gooey, that is an excellent suggestion! Good thinking...
                  Thanks,
                  Roger
                  On 5/25/2014 8:37 AM, 'Gooey Tarballs' gooeytarballs@... [Electronics_101] wrote:
                   

                  What about using a temperature control power cord from an old griddle?
                   
                  Just a thought as they are generally available at the Salvation Army, Goodwill, Habitat ReStores etc. when the surface of the grill gets old and scratched up.
                   
                  Generally, the temperature sensing element is a quarter-inch round piece that, liberated from the plastic plastic, (would seem to me) could be fit into another device by simply drilling  a two-inch long hole of the appropriate diameter into some point on the target device and running the connecting wires back to a convenient place to mount the dial control.
                   
                  I've saved a couple of these to use to keep the water from freezing before the chickens can drink it.

                  "Question with boldness even the existence of a God; because, if there be one, He must more approve of the homage of reason, than that of blind faith" Thomas Jefferson

                • jongkung01
                  Just a thought : I think those controller for griddle are design with power rating for the griddle. So if the griddle was 1,000 watts and you hooked it up to
                  Message 8 of 20 , May 25, 2014
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                    Just a thought : I think those controller for griddle are design with power rating for the griddle. 

                    So if the griddle was 1,000 watts and you hooked it up to lesser 100 watt heater, then the internal control element will never get hot enough and the control dial would be useless (always on). 

                    This is just my guess as I've never taken on apart. 

                    Any corrections would be welcomed. 


                    Jong 



                    On May 25, 2014, at 9:51 AM, "Roger Blair Roger.Blair@... [Electronics_101]" <Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

                    Gooey, that is an excellent suggestion! Good thinking...
                    Thanks,
                    Roger
                    On 5/25/2014 8:37 AM, 'Gooey Tarballs' gooeytarballs@... [Electronics_101] wrote:
                     

                    What about using a temperature control power cord from an old griddle?
                     
                    Just a thought as they are generally available at the Salvation Army, Goodwill, Habitat ReStores etc. when the surface of the grill gets old and scratched up.
                     
                    Generally, the temperature sensing element is a quarter-inch round piece that, liberated from the plastic plastic, (would seem to me) could be fit into another device by simply drilling  a two-inch long hole of the appropriate diameter into some point on the target device and running the connecting wires back to a convenient place to mount the dial control.
                     
                    I've saved a couple of these to use to keep the water from freezing before the chickens can drink it.

                    "Question with boldness even the existence of a God; because, if there be one, He must more approve of the homage of reason, than that of blind faith" Thomas Jefferson

                  • Roger Blair
                    I just opened one of these up that I got for $1.50 at a thrift shop. It is rated for 1500W. It has a knob marked up to 450 deg F. There are two contacts; the
                    Message 9 of 20 , May 25, 2014
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                      I just opened one of these up that I got for $1.50 at a thrift shop. It is rated for 1500W. It has a knob marked up to 450 deg F. There are two contacts; the adjustable one is pushed towards the floating one by turning the knob to go from off to high. The off position keeps the two contacts apart when cold, and when turned up, the contacts are driven together, and as the bi-metal probe arm's temperature increases from the heat of the cooker, it pushes the floating contact further away from the adjustable one, until opening the contacts at desired temperature setting.  Cooling causes the bi-metal probe arm to retract from the floating contact. The calibration of the markings may be compromised with a different wattage element, however I doubt any accuracy to start with. 1800W on a 120V 15A household circuit is max...

                      Roger

                      On 5/25/2014 2:52 PM, jongkung01@... [Electronics_101] wrote:
                       


                      Just a thought : I think those controller for griddle are design with power rating for the griddle. 

                      So if the griddle was 1,000 watts and you hooked it up to lesser 100 watt heater, then the internal control element will never get hot enough and the control dial would be useless (always on). 

                      This is just my guess as I've never taken on apart. 

                      Any corrections would be welcomed. 


                      Jong 



                      On May 25, 2014, at 9:51 AM, "Roger Blair Roger.Blair@... [Electronics_101]" <Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

                      Gooey, that is an excellent suggestion! Good thinking...
                      Thanks,
                      Roger
                      On 5/25/2014 8:37 AM, 'Gooey Tarballs' gooeytarballs@... [Electronics_101] wrote:
                       

                      What about using a temperature control power cord from an old griddle?
                       
                      Just a thought as they are generally available at the Salvation Army, Goodwill, Habitat ReStores etc. when the surface of the grill gets old and scratched up.
                       
                      Generally, the temperature sensing element is a quarter-inch round piece that, liberated from the plastic plastic, (would seem to me) could be fit into another device by simply drilling  a two-inch long hole of the appropriate diameter into some point on the target device and running the connecting wires back to a convenient place to mount the dial control.
                       
                      I've saved a couple of these to use to keep the water from freezing before the chickens can drink it.

                      "Question with boldness even the existence of a God; because, if there be one, He must more approve of the homage of reason, than that of blind faith" Thomas Jefferson


                  • Jong Kung
                    I agree. As long as the original griddle and the target device are approx similar wattage, it would might work (I m guessing of course). But it the target is
                    Message 10 of 20 , May 25, 2014
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                      I agree. As long as the original griddle and the target device are approx similar wattage, it would might work (I'm guessing of course). But it the target is much lower wattage, (ex: 100 watts target vs, 1000 watts original) then there's not enough current to make the bimetal sensor to ever heat up.

                      ====

                      Believe it or not I found those thing to be pretty good at temp control for the original griddle, skillet, etc. I have one of those electric skillet. I measured the temp of the surface using IR temp sensor (the kind you point and just reads the temp with no touching). I give you there are variation in these no-touch temp sensors, even so when you set skillet to temp X degree, is reads that temp (+/- 10 or 20 degrees). That's not bed for cooking.

                      But that's for empty skillet. There's just no way for an engineer to know in advance how much current and for how long it takes to heat up material for any length of time, to get to certain temp (without an temp sensor to the power controller). I don't believe these skillet temp controller have temp sensor. But an electric skillet is not a water boiler. Little bit of egg or bacon shouldn't change the energy require to reach some temp all that much.

                      Just some guessing on my part, and some experience on my part also.


                      Jong



                      On May 25, 2014, at 8:04 PM, "Roger Blair Roger.Blair@... [Electronics_101]" <Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

                      > The calibration of the markings may be compromised with a different wattage element, however I doubt any accuracy to start with. 1800W on a 120V 15A household circuit is max...
                    • Jong Kung
                      Wait, on closer look at the picture tells me the middle rod is the explicit temp sensor !!!! Then wattage might not matter at all !!! Jong
                      Message 11 of 20 , May 25, 2014
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                        Wait, on closer look at the picture tells me the middle rod is the explicit temp sensor !!!!

                        Then wattage might not matter at all !!!


                        Jong 

                        On May 25, 2014, at 8:04 PM, "Roger Blair Roger.Blair@... [Electronics_101]" <Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

                        I just opened one of these up that I got for $1.50 at a thrift shop. It is rated for 1500W. It has a knob marked up to 450 deg F. There are two contacts; the adjustable one is pushed towards the floating one by turning the knob to go from off to high. The off position keeps the two contacts apart when cold, and when turned up, the contacts are driven together, and as the bi-metal probe arm's temperature increases from the heat of the cooker, it pushes the floating contact further away from the adjustable one, until opening the contacts at desired temperature setting.  Cooling causes the bi-metal probe arm to retract from the floating contact. The calibration of the markings may be compromised with a different wattage element, however I doubt any accuracy to start with. 1800W on a 120V 15A household circuit is max...
                        <eeiahjee.jpg>
                        Roger

                        On 5/25/2014 2:52 PM, jongkung01@... [Electronics_101] wrote:
                         


                        Just a thought : I think those controller for griddle are design with power rating for the griddle. 

                        So if the griddle was 1,000 watts and you hooked it up to lesser 100 watt heater, then the internal control element will never get hot enough and the control dial would be useless (always on). 

                        This is just my guess as I've never taken on apart. 

                        Any corrections would be welcomed. 


                        Jong 



                        On May 25, 2014, at 9:51 AM, "Roger Blair Roger.Blair@... [Electronics_101]" <Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

                        Gooey, that is an excellent suggestion! Good thinking...
                        Thanks,
                        Roger
                        On 5/25/2014 8:37 AM, 'Gooey Tarballs' gooeytarballs@... [Electronics_101] wrote:
                         

                        What about using a temperature control power cord from an old griddle?
                         
                        Just a thought as they are generally available at the Salvation Army, Goodwill, Habitat ReStores etc. when the surface of the grill gets old and scratched up.
                         
                        Generally, the temperature sensing element is a quarter-inch round piece that, liberated from the plastic plastic, (would seem to me) could be fit into another device by simply drilling  a two-inch long hole of the appropriate diameter into some point on the target device and running the connecting wires back to a convenient place to mount the dial control.
                         
                        I've saved a couple of these to use to keep the water from freezing before the chickens can drink it.

                        "Question with boldness even the existence of a God; because, if there be one, He must more approve of the homage of reason, than that of blind faith" Thomas Jefferson


                        <Temperature Probe Controller.jpg>
                      • Stefan Trethan
                        You just totally wasted a perfectly fine post I had almost finished writing. ;-) The heater power and thermal mass will determing cycle time (PWM frequency),
                        Message 12 of 20 , May 25, 2014
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                          You just totally wasted a perfectly fine post I had almost finished writing. ;-)

                          The heater power and thermal mass will determing cycle time (PWM frequency), but not temperature accuracy.
                          To some extent thermal resistance between the heater and sensor will also matter for accuracy and overswing.

                          ST



                          On Mon, May 26, 2014 at 8:46 AM, Jong Kung jongkung01@... [Electronics_101] <Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com> wrote:




                          Wait, on closer look at the picture tells me the middle rod is the explicit temp sensor !!!!

                          Then wattage might not matter at all !!!


                          Jong
                           

                        • Jong Kung
                          ST, I always consider it a little badge of honor when you second my statement !! ==== I always thought these things work on fixed PWM - with no feedback. But
                          Message 13 of 20 , May 26, 2014
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                            ST,


                            I always consider it a little badge of honor when you second my statement !!

                            ====

                            I always thought these things work on fixed PWM - with no feedback. But now having seen the innards a little closer, it seems there is a temp sensor feedback.  No wonder the IR temp meter showed pretty good temp reading. 

                            As for your statement, yes the whole skillet had few hot spots and cold spot (still good, given it was all aluminum) - so there's going to be overheat and overshoot.  I started to really try to learn little bit of cooking only just few years ago - and one of the vital part of cooking is.... Stirring and keeping the food moving - large flat egg layer seems to show hotspot and cold spot without stirring.   The stirring seems to keep the temp "even". 

                            So large part of how these things manage to work is stuff unrelated to electronics (like stirring the food). 


                            Jong 


                            On May 25, 2014, at 8:50 PM, "Stefan Trethan stefan_trethan@... [Electronics_101]" <Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

                            You just totally wasted a perfectly fine post I had almost finished writing. ;-)

                            The heater power and thermal mass will determing cycle time (PWM frequency), but not temperature accuracy.
                            To some extent thermal resistance between the heater and sensor will also matter for accuracy and overswing.

                            ST



                            On Mon, May 26, 2014 at 8:46 AM, Jong Kung jongkung01@... [Electronics_101] <Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com> wrote:




                            Wait, on closer look at the picture tells me the middle rod is the explicit temp sensor !!!!

                            Then wattage might not matter at all !!!


                            Jong
                             

                          • Stefan Trethan
                            Some of these kitchen duty temperature controls operate on nothing more than a guess. I have a small toaster oven with a thermostat control, the thermostat
                            Message 14 of 20 , May 26, 2014
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                              Some of these "kitchen duty" temperature controls operate on nothing more than a guess.

                              I have a small toaster oven with a thermostat control, the thermostat sits right behind the knob with no way to sense the actual temperature in the food compartment. But guess what, it does work. Well, at least it does switch off at some point. Apparently when the interior gets hot enough to cook food the switch compartment gets slightly warm, which is enough information for the thermostat to work with.

                              Compared to that oven this griddle control is high precision!

                              ST




                              On Mon, May 26, 2014 at 9:04 AM, Jong Kung jongkung01@... [Electronics_101] <Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com> wrote:


                              ST,


                              I always consider it a little badge of honor when you second my statement !!

                              ====

                              I always thought these things work on fixed PWM - with no feedback. But now having seen the innards a little closer, it seems there is a temp sensor feedback.  No wonder the IR temp meter showed pretty good temp reading. 

                              As for your statement, yes the whole skillet had few hot spots and cold spot (still good, given it was all aluminum) - so there's going to be overheat and overshoot.  I started to really try to learn little bit of cooking only just few years ago - and one of the vital part of cooking is.... Stirring and keeping the food moving - large flat egg layer seems to show hotspot and cold spot without stirring.   The stirring seems to keep the temp "even". 

                              So large part of how these things manage to work is stuff unrelated to electronics (like stirring the food). 


                              Jong 


                            • Jong Kung
                              ST, I have an induction cooker with temp setting. It s all PWM guessing - I think. I don t believe there s any kind of temp sensor. Even when the frying pan is
                              Message 15 of 20 , May 26, 2014
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                                ST,


                                I have an induction cooker with temp setting. It's all PWM guessing - I think. I don't believe there's any kind of temp sensor. Even when the frying pan is up past 400 degree, the glass surface isn't so hot as to scorch my skin. So how can this temp setting have any real accuracy. 

                                I'm reading online the famous induction cooker sold on TV also have problem with accurate temp - dispute the TV commercials that claims accurate food temp. 


                                Jong 


                                On May 25, 2014, at 9:19 PM, "Stefan Trethan stefan_trethan@... [Electronics_101]" <Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

                                Some of these "kitchen duty" temperature controls operate on nothing more than a guess.

                                I have a small toaster oven with a thermostat control, the thermostat sits right behind the knob with no way to sense the actual temperature in the food compartment. But guess what, it does work. Well, at least it does switch off at some point. Apparently when the interior gets hot enough to cook food the switch compartment gets slightly warm, which is enough information for the thermostat to work with.

                                Compared to that oven this griddle control is high precision!

                                ST




                                On Mon, May 26, 2014 at 9:04 AM, Jong Kung jongkung01@... [Electronics_101] <Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com> wrote:


                                ST,


                                I always consider it a little badge of honor when you second my statement !!

                                ====

                                I always thought these things work on fixed PWM - with no feedback. But now having seen the innards a little closer, it seems there is a temp sensor feedback.  No wonder the IR temp meter showed pretty good temp reading. 

                                As for your statement, yes the whole skillet had few hot spots and cold spot (still good, given it was all aluminum) - so there's going to be overheat and overshoot.  I started to really try to learn little bit of cooking only just few years ago - and one of the vital part of cooking is.... Stirring and keeping the food moving - large flat egg layer seems to show hotspot and cold spot without stirring.   The stirring seems to keep the temp "even". 

                                So large part of how these things manage to work is stuff unrelated to electronics (like stirring the food). 


                                Jong 


                              • Gooey Tarballs
                                1,000 watts and you hooked it up to lesser 100 watt heater Well, how would the control know the wattage of the target device? Its sensor simply turns the
                                Message 16 of 20 , May 26, 2014
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                                  "1,000 watts and you hooked it up to lesser 100 watt heater"
                                   
                                  Well, how would the control 'know' the wattage of the target device?
                                   
                                  Its sensor simply turns the current off as, if and when it senses a temperature equal or greater than its present set point.
                                   
                                  Therefore, it would continue to stay 'on' until things got too hot.
                                   
                                  If, indeed, the target device consumed but 100 Watts, would it not simply heat up that much faster (thus switching off the current)? And, conversely, were the target device a 1000 watt unit, would it not simply take longer for it to heat? (or, do I have it Bass Asswards and it would take longer the lower the wattage?

                                  "Question with boldness even the existence of a God; because, if there be one, He must more approve of the homage of reason, than that of blind faith" Thomas Jefferson
                                • indago
                                  A lot of the small appliances, like a toaster oven, and a waffle iron, etc., work with a device called infinite heat control .  The ones used in electric
                                  Message 17 of 20 , May 26, 2014
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                                    A lot of the small appliances, like a toaster oven, and a waffle iron, etc., work with a device called "infinite heat control".  The ones used in electric stoves have an element that has a wire wrap around it ad heats up and bends while there is current running through it, then that disconnect the contacts, and the element then cools and bends back to make contact again.  Turning the adjustment knob moves the contacts closer or further away so that the bending element has further to travel to make contact.  When the stove element is set to "WARM", the contacts are further apart, and the element is off more than it's on.  On "HIGH", the contacts are closer together, and the control is on more than it is off.

                                    The controls for the waffle iron, and hot plate type units have a similar control but no wired strip.  The current through the control heats a strip that has contacts on it, and that bends and breaks the contact; then, cools and moves back to make contact again.  But it works the same: the further the contacts are from each other, the more it is off, and thus the "WARM" setting.



                                    On Monday, May 26, 2014 10:12 AM, "'Gooey Tarballs' gooeytarballs@... [Electronics_101]" <Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com> wrote:


                                     
                                    "1,000 watts and you hooked it up to lesser 100 watt heater"
                                     
                                    Well, how would the control 'know' the wattage of the target device?
                                     
                                    Its sensor simply turns the current off as, if and when it senses a temperature equal or greater than its present set point.
                                     
                                    Therefore, it would continue to stay 'on' until things got too hot.
                                     
                                    If, indeed, the target device consumed but 100 Watts, would it not simply heat up that much faster (thus switching off the current)? And, conversely, were the target device a 1000 watt unit, would it not simply take longer for it to heat? (or, do I have it Bass Asswards and it would take longer the lower the wattage?

                                    "Question with boldness even the existence of a God; because, if there be one, He must more approve of the homage of reason, than that of blind faith" Thomas Jefferson


                                  • Jong Kung
                                    Yes - when I wrote that about 1000 watt vs 100 watt, I was thinking about controllers without temp sensors. Some controllers uses the current to heat up the
                                    Message 18 of 20 , May 26, 2014
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                                      Yes - when I wrote that about 1000 watt vs 100 watt, I was thinking about controllers without temp sensors. 

                                      Some controllers uses the current to heat up the bimetal element (not temp sensor).  So if it expected ("calibrated for") 1000 watts, and only passed 100 watts... This is what I was thinking. 

                                      But on closer examination of the photo of the controller inside, it indeed does seem to have a temp probe - making the current / amp discussion moot. 


                                      Jong 



                                      On May 26, 2014, at 4:09 AM, "'Gooey Tarballs' gooeytarballs@... [Electronics_101]" <Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

                                      "1,000 watts and you hooked it up to lesser 100 watt heater"
                                       
                                      Well, how would the control 'know' the wattage of the target device?
                                       
                                      Its sensor simply turns the current off as, if and when it senses a temperature equal or greater than its present set point.
                                       
                                      Therefore, it would continue to stay 'on' until things got too hot.
                                       
                                      If, indeed, the target device consumed but 100 Watts, would it not simply heat up that much faster (thus switching off the current)? And, conversely, were the target device a 1000 watt unit, would it not simply take longer for it to heat? (or, do I have it Bass Asswards and it would take longer the lower the wattage?

                                      "Question with boldness even the existence of a God; because, if there be one, He must more approve of the homage of reason, than that of blind faith" Thomas Jefferson
                                    • epa_iii
                                      I disagree with it not working with 100 Watts. These cords are sensing the temperature and if you have enough power (Wattage) to reach the target temperature
                                      Message 19 of 20 , May 26, 2014
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                                        I disagree with it not working with 100 Watts. These cords are sensing the temperature and if you have enough power (Wattage) to reach the target temperature and heat up the probe area to that temperature, then they should work. Now if you get down to 1 Watt or so, then it may get difficult, but 100 Watts is probably enough to do it if the temperature probe is fairly well connected (thermally) to the hot plate.

                                        Frankly, I would probably look at some other solution. A small temperature sensor and a PIC?



                                        ---In Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com, <jongkung01@...> wrote :

                                        I agree. As long as the original griddle and the target device are approx similar wattage, it would might work (I'm guessing of course). But it the target is much lower wattage, (ex: 100 watts target vs, 1000 watts original) then there's not enough current to make the bimetal sensor to ever heat up.

                                        ====

                                        ...<snip>...

                                        Jong

                                      • Jong Kung
                                        See my later post. Jong
                                        Message 20 of 20 , May 26, 2014
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                                          See my later post.


                                          Jong 

                                          On May 26, 2014, at 8:56 AM, "palciatore@... [Electronics_101]" <Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

                                          I disagree with it not working with 100 Watts. These cords are sensing the temperature and if you have enough power (Wattage) to reach the target temperature and heat up the probe area to that temperature, then they should work. Now if you get down to 1 Watt or so, then it may get difficult, but 100 Watts is probably enough to do it if the temperature probe is fairly well connected (thermally) to the hot plate.

                                          Frankly, I would probably look at some other solution. A small temperature sensor and a PIC?



                                          ---In Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com, <jongkung01@...> wrote :

                                          I agree. As long as the original griddle and the target device are approx similar wattage, it would might work (I'm guessing of course). But it the target is much lower wattage, (ex: 100 watts target vs, 1000 watts original) then there's not enough current to make the bimetal sensor to ever heat up.

                                          ====

                                          ...<snip>...

                                          Jong

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