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Re: [Electronics_101] Re: Soldering challenge (was: Why am I smoking this step-up regulator?)

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  • Nathan McCorkle
    Did you ever actually try the circuit with the datasheet-recommended configuration? It specifically mentions needing /at least/ 10uF, and mentions not to use
    Message 1 of 30 , Sep 5, 2013
      Did you ever actually try the circuit with the datasheet-recommended configuration? It specifically mentions needing /at least/ 10uF, and mentions not to use tantalum, recommending ceramic X5R X7R caps instead.


      On Thu, Sep 5, 2013 at 10:15 AM, Don <DCFrench@...> wrote:
       

      I was going to try that iron technique but got stymied at first when I could find no way to make a pad on the opposite side of the board. Also, the smallest via I can make (with Eagle) is rather large - larger than the vias that the autorouter makes and certainly larger than the ones he made. I kind of hate to remove that much of the heat sink surface. I think I solved the first problem by adding another regulator to the schematic but not wiring up any of its pins and then placing it on the opposite side of the board from the first one. Maybe I can solve the second problem by filling the vias after the part is soldered on - or maybe they will fill in automatically. Worth a try, I guess.



      --- In Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com, "Don" <DCFrench@...> wrote:
      >
      > Thanks! I just learned quite a lot from that crazy Aussie bloke.
      >
      >
      > --- In Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com, Stefan Trethan <stefan_trethan@> wrote:
      > >
      > > Oven, hotplate, or hot air.
      > >
      > > That crazy aussie bloke has a video on youtube showing how you can do it
      > > with just an iron if there are vias:
      > > <http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=588iV07nEdM>
      > >
      > > ST
      > >
      > > On Thu, Sep 5, 2013 at 6:07 AM, Don <DCFrench@> wrote:
      > >
      > > > The regulator has a large pad on its bottom. How do I solder that thing?
      > > > Toaster oven?
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > >
      >




      --
      -Nathan
    • Stefan Trethan
      I believe you do something wrong with eagle. Don t get me wrong, eagle is crap, but this I have done with it. You can adjust the via size and you can place a
      Message 2 of 30 , Sep 5, 2013
        I believe you do something wrong with eagle.
        Don't get me wrong, eagle is crap, but this I have done with it.

        You can adjust the via size and you can place a square in the soldermask layer of the far side.
        Don't ask me how, those are repressed memories.

        You should want the vias regardless of soldering, because you need to transfer the heat the other other layer for dissipation.


        ST


        On Thu, Sep 5, 2013 at 7:15 PM, Don <DCFrench@...> wrote:
        I was going to try that iron technique but got stymied at first when I could find no way to make a pad on the opposite side of the board.  Also, the smallest via I can make (with Eagle) is rather large - larger than the vias that the autorouter makes and certainly larger than the ones he made. I kind of hate to remove that much of the heat sink surface.  I think I solved the first problem by adding another regulator to the schematic but not wiring up any of its pins and then placing it on the opposite side of the board from the first one.  Maybe I can solve the second problem by filling the vias after the part is soldered on - or maybe they will fill in automatically.  Worth a try, I guess.

        --- In Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com, "Don" <DCFrench@...> wrote:
        >
        > Thanks!  I just learned quite a lot from that crazy Aussie bloke.
        >
        >
        > --- In Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com, Stefan Trethan <stefan_trethan@> wrote:
        > >
        > > Oven, hotplate, or hot air.
        > >
        > > That crazy aussie bloke has a video on youtube showing how you can do it
        > > with just an iron if there are vias:
        > > <http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=588iV07nEdM>
        > >
        > > ST
        > >
        > > On Thu, Sep 5, 2013 at 6:07 AM, Don <DCFrench@> wrote:
        > >
        > > > The regulator has a large pad on its bottom.  How do I solder that thing?
        > > >  Toaster oven?
        > > >
        > > >
        > > >
        > >
        >




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      • Don
        Not yet. I didn t have any 10 uF caps so I substituted 4.7uF ones, thinking that it wouldn t matter that much. So, as I have said in earlier posts, I will
        Message 3 of 30 , Sep 6, 2013
          Not yet. I didn't have any 10 uF caps so I substituted 4.7uF ones, thinking that it wouldn't matter that much. So, as I have said in earlier posts, I will try that and a different inductor as soon as I get them. BTW, what does X5R and X7R mean?



          --- In Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com, Nathan McCorkle <nmz787@...> wrote:
          >
          > Did you ever actually try the circuit with the datasheet-recommended
          > configuration? It specifically mentions needing /at least/ 10uF, and
          > mentions not to use tantalum, recommending ceramic X5R X7R caps instead.
          >
          >
          > On Thu, Sep 5, 2013 at 10:15 AM, Don <DCFrench@...> wrote:
          >
          > > **
          > >
          > >
          > > I was going to try that iron technique but got stymied at first when I
          > > could find no way to make a pad on the opposite side of the board. Also,
          > > the smallest via I can make (with Eagle) is rather large - larger than the
          > > vias that the autorouter makes and certainly larger than the ones he made.
          > > I kind of hate to remove that much of the heat sink surface. I think I
          > > solved the first problem by adding another regulator to the schematic but
          > > not wiring up any of its pins and then placing it on the opposite side of
          > > the board from the first one. Maybe I can solve the second problem by
          > > filling the vias after the part is soldered on - or maybe they will fill in
          > > automatically. Worth a try, I guess.
          > >
          > >
          > > --- In Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com, "Don" <DCFrench@> wrote:
          > > >
          > > > Thanks! I just learned quite a lot from that crazy Aussie bloke.
          > > >
          > > >
          > > > --- In Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com, Stefan Trethan <stefan_trethan@>
          > > wrote:
          > > > >
          > > > > Oven, hotplate, or hot air.
          > > > >
          > > > > That crazy aussie bloke has a video on youtube showing how you can do
          > > it
          > > > > with just an iron if there are vias:
          > > > > <http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=588iV07nEdM>
          > > > >
          > > > > ST
          > > > >
          > > > > On Thu, Sep 5, 2013 at 6:07 AM, Don <DCFrench@> wrote:
          > > > >
          > > > > > The regulator has a large pad on its bottom. How do I solder that
          > > thing?
          > > > > > Toaster oven?
          > > > > >
          > > > > >
          > > > > >
          > > > >
          > > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          >
          >
          >
          > --
          > -Nathan
          >
        • Nathan McCorkle
          ... 2nd hit on google for X5R http://www.edaboard.com/thread71490.html seems to be a temperature rating: X means minimum temperature range -55degC 5 means
          Message 4 of 30 , Sep 6, 2013



            On Fri, Sep 6, 2013 at 10:10 AM, Don <DCFrench@...> wrote:
             

            Not yet. I didn't have any 10 uF caps so I substituted 4.7uF ones, thinking that it wouldn't matter that much. So, as I have said in earlier posts, I will try that and a different inductor as soon as I get them. BTW, what does X5R and X7R mean? 


            2nd hit on google for 'X5R'

            seems to be a temperature rating:
            "
            X means minimum temperature range -55degC
            5 means maximum temperature range +85degC
            R means percentage of capacitance change permitted +/- 15%

            X means minimum temperature range -55degC
            7 means maximum temperature range +125degC
            R means percentage of capacitance change permitted +/- 15%
            "
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