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What is this called?

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  • Frank P
    I am in the process of trying to secure a cat door at night to keep the raccoons out of my home. I have an electronic component which I think will assist me in
    Message 1 of 12 , Aug 16, 2013
      I am in the process of trying to secure a cat door at night to keep the raccoons out of my home. I have an electronic component which I think will assist me in this effort but am baffled as to what it is called and where to find a larger one.

      The component I have is a cylinder about 1/3 of an inch long and I believe is has a coil with a metal rod on the inside. When I apply DC voltage to this coil, the metal rod retracts into the cylinder.

      I think this device would be handy in helping me "lock" the cat door in position (either open or closed).

      Regardless, does anyone know what they call this thing and where I might be able to acquire a larger one?

      Thanks.

      FP
    • Stefan Trethan
      It s called a solenoid or lifting magnet. ST ... [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      Message 2 of 12 , Aug 16, 2013
        It's called a solenoid or lifting magnet.


        ST


        On Fri, Aug 16, 2013 at 7:25 PM, Frank P <qz9090@...> wrote:

        > I am in the process of trying to secure a cat door at night to keep the
        > raccoons out of my home. I have an electronic component which I think will
        > assist me in this effort but am baffled as to what it is called and where
        > to find a larger one.
        >
        > The component I have is a cylinder about 1/3 of an inch long and I believe
        > is has a coil with a metal rod on the inside. When I apply DC voltage to
        > this coil, the metal rod retracts into the cylinder.
        >
        > I think this device would be handy in helping me "lock" the cat door in
        > position (either open or closed).
        >
        > Regardless, does anyone know what they call this thing and where I might
        > be able to acquire a larger one?
        >
        > Thanks.
        >
        > FP
        >
        >
        >
        > ------------------------------------
        >
        > Please trim excess when replyingYahoo! Groups Links
        >
        >
        >
        >


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Robert
        For your purpose be sure and select one rated for continuous duty. Bob
        Message 3 of 12 , Aug 16, 2013
          For your purpose be sure and select one rated for continuous duty.
          Bob

          --- In Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com, Stefan Trethan <stefan_trethan@...> wrote:
          >
          > It's called a solenoid or lifting magnet.
          >
          >
          > ST
          >
          >
          > On Fri, Aug 16, 2013 at 7:25 PM, Frank P <qz9090@...> wrote:
          >
          > > I am in the process of trying to secure a cat door at night to keep the
          > > raccoons out of my home. I have an electronic component which I think will
          > > assist me in this effort but am baffled as to what it is called and where
          > > to find a larger one.
          > >
          > > The component I have is a cylinder about 1/3 of an inch long and I believe
          > > is has a coil with a metal rod on the inside. When I apply DC voltage to
          > > this coil, the metal rod retracts into the cylinder.
          > >
          > > I think this device would be handy in helping me "lock" the cat door in
          > > position (either open or closed).
          > >
          > > Regardless, does anyone know what they call this thing and where I might
          > > be able to acquire a larger one?
          > >
          > > Thanks.
          > >
          > > FP
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > > ------------------------------------
          > >
          > > Please trim excess when replyingYahoo! Groups Links
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          >
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
        • Frank Mead
          I sounds like a solenoid.. a good source might be an old washing machine or dishwasher.. if ya have one laying around.. Frank ... [Non-text portions of this
          Message 4 of 12 , Aug 16, 2013
            I sounds like a solenoid.. a good source might be an old washing machine or
            dishwasher..
            if ya have one laying around..

            Frank


            On Fri, Aug 16, 2013 at 12:25 PM, Frank P <qz9090@...> wrote:

            > **
            >
            >
            > I am in the process of trying to secure a cat door at night to keep the
            > raccoons out of my home. I have an electronic component which I think will
            > assist me in this effort but am baffled as to what it is called and where
            > to find a larger one.
            >
            > The component I have is a cylinder about 1/3 of an inch long and I believe
            > is has a coil with a metal rod on the inside. When I apply DC voltage to
            > this coil, the metal rod retracts into the cylinder.
            >
            > I think this device would be handy in helping me "lock" the cat door in
            > position (either open or closed).
            >
            > Regardless, does anyone know what they call this thing and where I might
            > be able to acquire a larger one?
            >
            > Thanks.
            >
            > FP
            >
            >
            >


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Jamie Cunningham
            yeah sounds like a solenoid to me too - one thing you might want to think about is whether it s energized and the door is locked or the other way around - for
            Message 5 of 12 , Aug 16, 2013
              yeah sounds like a solenoid to me too - one thing you might want to think
              about is whether it's energized and the door is locked or the other way
              around - for instance if you lose power, you'd probably want it locked

              Jamie
              Check out my CNC projects (and more) at http://www.backyardworkshop.com


              On Fri, Aug 16, 2013 at 2:50 PM, Frank Mead <wa6ujj@...> wrote:

              > I sounds like a solenoid.. a good source might be an old washing machine or
              > dishwasher..
              > if ya have one laying around..
              >
              > Frank
              >
              >
              > On Fri, Aug 16, 2013 at 12:25 PM, Frank P <qz9090@...> wrote:
              >
              > > **
              > >
              > >
              > > I am in the process of trying to secure a cat door at night to keep the
              > > raccoons out of my home. I have an electronic component which I think
              > will
              > > assist me in this effort but am baffled as to what it is called and where
              > > to find a larger one.
              > >
              > > The component I have is a cylinder about 1/3 of an inch long and I
              > believe
              > > is has a coil with a metal rod on the inside. When I apply DC voltage to
              > > this coil, the metal rod retracts into the cylinder.
              > >
              > > I think this device would be handy in helping me "lock" the cat door in
              > > position (either open or closed).
              > >
              > > Regardless, does anyone know what they call this thing and where I might
              > > be able to acquire a larger one?
              > >
              > > Thanks.
              > >
              > > FP
              > >
              > >
              > >
              >
              >
              > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              >
              >
              >
              > ------------------------------------
              >
              > Please trim excess when replyingYahoo! Groups Links
              >
              >
              >
              >


              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Howard Hansen
              If you build a electromagnetic door latch your first choice should be a latching solenoid. You only need to apply power to a latching solenoid to move the
              Message 6 of 12 , Aug 16, 2013
                If you build a electromagnetic door latch your first choice should be a
                latching solenoid. You only need to apply power to a latching solenoid
                to move the core tube. Whereas with some solenoids you to continuously
                apply power to keep the core tube extended.

                The other Howard





                On 8/16/2013 12:34 PM, Stefan Trethan wrote:
                >
                > It's called a solenoid or lifting magnet.
                >
                > ST
                >
                > On Fri, Aug 16, 2013 at 7:25 PM, Frank P <qz9090@...
                > <mailto:qz9090%40yahoo.com>> wrote:
                >
                > > I am in the process of trying to secure a cat door at night to keep the
                > > raccoons out of my home. I have an electronic component which I
                > think will
                > > assist me in this effort but am baffled as to what it is called and
                > where
                > > to find a larger one.
                > >
                > > The component I have is a cylinder about 1/3 of an inch long and I
                > believe
                > > is has a coil with a metal rod on the inside. When I apply DC voltage to
                > > this coil, the metal rod retracts into the cylinder.
                > >
                > > I think this device would be handy in helping me "lock" the cat door in
                > > position (either open or closed).
                > >
                > > Regardless, does anyone know what they call this thing and where I might
                > > be able to acquire a larger one?
                > >
                > > Thanks.
                > >
                > > FP
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > > ------------------------------------
                > >
                > > Please trim excess when replyingYahoo! Groups Links
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > >
                >
                > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                >
                >



                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • AlienRelics
                Or build a mechanism that latches in place, so the solenoid does not have to be continuously energized. BTW, most pinball solenoids will burn up quickly if you
                Message 7 of 12 , Aug 17, 2013
                  Or build a mechanism that latches in place, so the solenoid does not have to be continuously energized.

                  BTW, most pinball solenoids will burn up quickly if you try to keep them energized for very long. However, they are very powerful and well suited to a latching lock mechanism. With people building their own pinball games, they are not hard to find.

                  Steve Greenfield AE7HD

                  --- In Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com, "Robert" <go_boating_fast@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > For your purpose be sure and select one rated for continuous duty.
                  > Bob
                  >
                  > --- In Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com, Stefan Trethan <stefan_trethan@> wrote:
                  > >
                  > > It's called a solenoid or lifting magnet.
                  > >
                  > >
                  > > ST
                  > >
                  > >
                  > > On Fri, Aug 16, 2013 at 7:25 PM, Frank P <qz9090@> wrote:
                  > >
                  > > > I am in the process of trying to secure a cat door at night to keep the
                  > > > raccoons out of my home. I have an electronic component which I think will
                  > > > assist me in this effort but am baffled as to what it is called and where
                  > > > to find a larger one.
                  > > >
                • Larry Beaty
                  Frank, those solenoids may be intermittent duty only. Watch out for that. Larry ... From: Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com
                  Message 8 of 12 , Aug 17, 2013
                    Frank, those solenoids may be intermittent duty only. Watch out for that.

                    Larry

                    -----Original Message-----
                    From: Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com
                    [mailto:Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Frank Mead
                    Sent: Friday, August 16, 2013 2:50 PM
                    To: Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com
                    Subject: Re: [Electronics_101] What is this called?

                    I sounds like a solenoid.. a good source might be an old washing machine or
                    dishwasher..
                    if ya have one laying around..

                    Frank


                    On Fri, Aug 16, 2013 at 12:25 PM, Frank P <qz9090@...> wrote:

                    > **
                    >
                    >
                    > I am in the process of trying to secure a cat door at night to keep
                    > the raccoons out of my home. I have an electronic component which I
                    > think will assist me in this effort but am baffled as to what it is
                    > called and where to find a larger one.
                    >
                    > The component I have is a cylinder about 1/3 of an inch long and I
                    > believe is has a coil with a metal rod on the inside. When I apply DC
                    > voltage to this coil, the metal rod retracts into the cylinder.
                    >
                    > I think this device would be handy in helping me "lock" the cat door
                    > in position (either open or closed).
                    >
                    > Regardless, does anyone know what they call this thing and where I
                    > might be able to acquire a larger one?
                    >
                    > Thanks.
                    >
                    > FP
                    >
                    >
                    >


                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



                    ------------------------------------

                    Please trim excess when replyingYahoo! Groups Links
                  • John
                    I would look for an electric automotive door lock actuator. They work like a solenoid but are motor driven. They are also pretty cheap from vendors like BG
                    Message 9 of 12 , Aug 17, 2013
                      I would look for an electric automotive door lock actuator. They work like a solenoid but are motor driven. They are also pretty cheap from vendors like BG Micro and Alltronics. Probably a little more from JC Whitney.
                      de W8CCW

                      --- In Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com, "AlienRelics" <alienrelics@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > Or build a mechanism that latches in place, so the solenoid does not have to be continuously energized.
                      >
                      > BTW, most pinball solenoids will burn up quickly if you try to keep them energized for very long. However, they are very powerful and well suited to a latching lock mechanism. With people building their own pinball games, they are not hard to find.
                      >
                      > Steve Greenfield AE7HD
                      >
                      > --- In Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com, "Robert" <go_boating_fast@> wrote:
                      > >
                      > > For your purpose be sure and select one rated for continuous duty.
                      > > Bob
                      > >
                      > > --- In Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com, Stefan Trethan <stefan_trethan@> wrote:
                      > > >
                      > > > It's called a solenoid or lifting magnet.
                      > > >
                      > > >
                      > > > ST
                      > > >
                      > > >
                      > > > On Fri, Aug 16, 2013 at 7:25 PM, Frank P <qz9090@> wrote:
                      > > >
                      > > > > I am in the process of trying to secure a cat door at night to keep the
                      > > > > raccoons out of my home. I have an electronic component which I think will
                      > > > > assist me in this effort but am baffled as to what it is called and where
                      > > > > to find a larger one.
                      > > > >
                      >
                    • Frank P
                      Thanks, everyone! I did some Googling and , yep, I think you guys are right, it sounds like a solenoid. Really appreciate your input.... Frank P.
                      Message 10 of 12 , Aug 19, 2013
                        Thanks, everyone! I did some "Googling" and , yep, I think you guys are right, it sounds like a solenoid.

                        Really appreciate your input....

                        Frank P.

                        --- In Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com, Howard Hansen <hrhan@...> wrote:
                        >
                        > If you build a electromagnetic door latch your first choice should be a
                        > latching solenoid. You only need to apply power to a latching solenoid
                        > to move the core tube. Whereas with some solenoids you to continuously
                        > apply power to keep the core tube extended.
                        >
                        > The other Howard
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        > On 8/16/2013 12:34 PM, Stefan Trethan wrote:
                        > >
                        > > It's called a solenoid or lifting magnet.
                        > >
                        > > ST
                        > >
                        > > On Fri, Aug 16, 2013 at 7:25 PM, Frank P <qz9090@...
                        > > <mailto:qz9090%40yahoo.com>> wrote:
                        > >
                        > > > I am in the process of trying to secure a cat door at night to keep the
                        > > > raccoons out of my home. I have an electronic component which I
                        > > think will
                        > > > assist me in this effort but am baffled as to what it is called and
                        > > where
                        > > > to find a larger one.
                        > > >
                        > > > The component I have is a cylinder about 1/3 of an inch long and I
                        > > believe
                        > > > is has a coil with a metal rod on the inside. When I apply DC voltage to
                        > > > this coil, the metal rod retracts into the cylinder.
                        > > >
                        > > > I think this device would be handy in helping me "lock" the cat door in
                        > > > position (either open or closed).
                        > > >
                        > > > Regardless, does anyone know what they call this thing and where I might
                        > > > be able to acquire a larger one?
                        > > >
                        > > > Thanks.
                        > > >
                        > > > FP
                        > > >
                        > > >
                        > > >
                        > > > ------------------------------------
                        > > >
                        > > > Please trim excess when replyingYahoo! Groups Links
                        > > >
                        > > >
                        > > >
                        > > >
                        > >
                        > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        > >
                        > >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        >
                      • Frank P
                        John, Since it used in cars, does it mean that the actuators are powered by 12V DC? FP
                        Message 11 of 12 , Aug 19, 2013
                          John,
                          Since it used in cars, does it mean that the actuators are powered by 12V DC?

                          FP

                          --- In Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com, "John" <jferrell13@...> wrote:
                          >
                          > I would look for an electric automotive door lock actuator. They work like a solenoid but are motor driven. They are also pretty cheap from vendors like BG Micro and Alltronics. Probably a little more from JC Whitney.
                          > de W8CCW
                          >
                          > --- In Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com, "AlienRelics" <alienrelics@> wrote:
                          > >
                          > > Or build a mechanism that latches in place, so the solenoid does not have to be continuously energized.
                          > >
                          > > BTW, most pinball solenoids will burn up quickly if you try to keep them energized for very long. However, they are very powerful and well suited to a latching lock mechanism. With people building their own pinball games, they are not hard to find.
                          > >
                          > > Steve Greenfield AE7HD
                          > >
                          > > --- In Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com, "Robert" <go_boating_fast@> wrote:
                          > > >
                          > > > For your purpose be sure and select one rated for continuous duty.
                          > > > Bob
                          > > >
                          > > > --- In Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com, Stefan Trethan <stefan_trethan@> wrote:
                          > > > >
                          > > > > It's called a solenoid or lifting magnet.
                          > > > >
                          > > > >
                          > > > > ST
                          > > > >
                          > > > >
                          > > > > On Fri, Aug 16, 2013 at 7:25 PM, Frank P <qz9090@> wrote:
                          > > > >
                          > > > > > I am in the process of trying to secure a cat door at night to keep the
                          > > > > > raccoons out of my home. I have an electronic component which I think will
                          > > > > > assist me in this effort but am baffled as to what it is called and where
                          > > > > > to find a larger one.
                          > > > > >
                          > >
                          >
                        • John
                          Yes, it is 12 volts. It is used to adapt door locks to power activation. It is driven both directions where a solenoid is usually driven on way and returned by
                          Message 12 of 12 , Aug 20, 2013
                            Yes, it is 12 volts. It is used to adapt door locks to power activation. It is driven both directions where a solenoid is usually driven on way and returned by a spring.


                            --- In Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com, "Frank P" <qz9090@...> wrote:
                            >
                            > John,
                            > Since it used in cars, does it mean that the actuators are powered by 12V DC?
                            >
                            > FP
                            >
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