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Re: [Electronics_101] Soldering iron suggestions

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  • Gustavo Villada
    Buy an Atten 858D, 40 with s&h included ... [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    Message 1 of 15 , Jun 28, 2013
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      Buy an Atten 858D, 40 with s&h included


      On Fri, Jun 28, 2013 at 12:56 PM, Yan Seiner <yan@...> wrote:

      > **
      >
      >
      > I got one of these boards for some prototype work I am doing. They
      > recommend a soldering iron with a tip smaller than .65mm, with a tip
      > temp of 725 degrees.
      >
      > http://www.schmartboard.com/index.asp?page=products_smttodip&id=448
      >
      > I've been using a cheap ($10) Weller which works great on .1" boards,
      > but the tip is way too big for this kind of work.
      >
      > I can't find a small tip for the Weller that I have. The local Radio
      > Shack collection of soldering irons is useless.
      >
      > What's a decent soldering iron that meets those requirements and won't
      > break the bank?
      >
      > --
      > Project Management Consulting and Training
      > http://www.ridgelineconsultingllc.com
      >
      >
      >


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • KPL
      I remember there were tips with a slit (just like cut with a thin saw) in them, which were working same way. Anyway, is there any known easy method to
      Message 2 of 15 , Jul 1, 2013
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        I remember there were tips with a slit (just like cut with a thin saw) in
        them, which were working same way.
        Anyway, is there any known easy method to create/restore that (iron?)
        coating on tips, that way anyone could modify tips to try different designs.

        In terms of tips I can highly recommend a concave tip for SMD work.
        > They go under different names such as "mini hoof", "solder well",
        > "mini spoon" and the like.
        > <http://www.jbctools.com/productes/C245938/img/tam_1/imagen_01.gif>
        > Basically you are looking at a tip cut at an angle with a concave area
        > that sucks up solder.
        > You can do all sorts of interesting things with this, from drag
        > soldering SMD parts to taking excess solder off component leads. It is
        > hard to describe but this concave section drastically extends the
        > "workable" range between too much solder on the tip and too little
        > solder on the tip. The joints will turn out with the right size fillet
        > more often with less effort.
        >
        > Another great feature about the concave tip is that you can relatively
        > easily heat both sides of chip components, such as resistors or
        > capacitors. This works better than skipping from one side to the other
        > with a pencil or chisel tip.
        >
        > Generally the tips cut at an angle like this (concave section or not)
        > give you a much wider range of applications than a similar size chisel
        > tip. You can get a big contact area if you lay them on sideways, or
        > use just the point. I don't use my chisel tips at all any more.
        >
        > ST
        >
        >
        --
        KPL


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Stefan Trethan
        I ve played with the thought, but the manufacturers claim a multi-layer plating process. ST
        Message 3 of 15 , Jul 1, 2013
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          I've played with the thought, but the manufacturers claim a
          multi-layer plating process.

          ST

          On Mon, Jul 1, 2013 at 11:11 PM, KPL <kpl.listes@...> wrote:
          > I remember there were tips with a slit (just like cut with a thin saw) in
          > them, which were working same way.
          > Anyway, is there any known easy method to create/restore that (iron?)
          > coating on tips, that way anyone could modify tips to try different designs.
          >
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