Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: [Electronics_101] Soldering iron suggestions

Expand Messages
  • Gustavo Villada
    Buy an Atten 858D, 40 with s&h included ... [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    Message 1 of 15 , Jun 28, 2013
    • 0 Attachment
      Buy an Atten 858D, 40 with s&h included


      On Fri, Jun 28, 2013 at 12:56 PM, Yan Seiner <yan@...> wrote:

      > **
      >
      >
      > I got one of these boards for some prototype work I am doing. They
      > recommend a soldering iron with a tip smaller than .65mm, with a tip
      > temp of 725 degrees.
      >
      > http://www.schmartboard.com/index.asp?page=products_smttodip&id=448
      >
      > I've been using a cheap ($10) Weller which works great on .1" boards,
      > but the tip is way too big for this kind of work.
      >
      > I can't find a small tip for the Weller that I have. The local Radio
      > Shack collection of soldering irons is useless.
      >
      > What's a decent soldering iron that meets those requirements and won't
      > break the bank?
      >
      > --
      > Project Management Consulting and Training
      > http://www.ridgelineconsultingllc.com
      >
      >
      >


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • David Bobb
      We had Wellers at work that were junk, don t remember the model number. The majority of what we had were Hakko 936. Also had two Hakko rework stations, and a
      Message 2 of 15 , Jun 28, 2013
      • 0 Attachment
        We had Wellers at work that were junk, don't remember the model number. The
        majority of what we had were Hakko 936. Also had two Hakko rework stations,
        and a few Pace rework stations. The pace vacuum tubes for the suckers were
        always braking. The pace were being worked on more than used. I got two
        936s from eBay for $30 a piece and had to fix them, but now they are great,
        6 years later. I have two so I don't have to change tips in the middle of a
        project.
        On Jun 28, 2013 11:18 AM, "Stefan Trethan" <stefan_trethan@...> wrote:

        > **
        >
        >
        > It will definitely break the bank, but if you want to really treat
        > yourself get a JBC station.
        > I'm told Metcal are also just as nice but I can't personally vouch for
        > them.
        >
        > The second tier are Ersa and Weller stations. Those will work
        > perfectly for what you need.
        > Both manufacturers sell a few different series with different tips
        > available for each, so check first if you can get the tips you want.
        > Others also count Hakko and Pace in this class.
        >
        > After that come the cheaper stations from Asia, some of them offer a
        > decent range of tips and some of them are clones of other
        > maunfacturers such as Hakko etc. and partially compatible. You can get
        > the job done with some of them, but a pleasure it ain't. They are
        > cheap.
        >
        > If you break it down to a cost per joint basis the cheaper stations
        > are most reasonable if you don't do all that much.
        > But if it isn't all about the money, if you do the soldering for fun,
        > I can guarantee you that you will have much more fun with better
        > tools.
        >
        > ST
        >
        > On Fri, Jun 28, 2013 at 5:56 PM, Yan Seiner <yan@...> wrote:
        > > I got one of these boards for some prototype work I am doing. They
        > > recommend a soldering iron with a tip smaller than .65mm, with a tip
        > > temp of 725 degrees.
        > >
        > > http://www.schmartboard.com/index.asp?page=products_smttodip&id=448
        > >
        > > I've been using a cheap ($10) Weller which works great on .1" boards,
        > > but the tip is way too big for this kind of work.
        > >
        > > I can't find a small tip for the Weller that I have. The local Radio
        > > Shack collection of soldering irons is useless.
        > >
        > > What's a decent soldering iron that meets those requirements and won't
        > > break the bank?
        > >
        > > --
        > > Project Management Consulting and Training
        > > http://www.ridgelineconsultingllc.com
        > >
        > >
        > >
        >
        >


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Deu Sjevoo
        Post I did on a forum long ago:It s about JBC.Worth every penny.Weller and Ersa can t tip it. A good cheaper choice is the Jovy iSolder.Reacts fast, keeps
        Message 3 of 15 , Jun 28, 2013
        • 0 Attachment
          Post I did on a forum long ago:It's about JBC.Worth every penny.Weller and Ersa can't tip it.
          A good cheaper choice is the Jovy iSolder.Reacts fast, keeps temps.
          The Post:
          It's not about a soldering station getting up to 500c.

          I prefer one going 350 only but having at least 70 watts, with a very fast reaction time.
          instead of one going to 500c with only 35-50 watt.
          It is a hell of a difference.
          Cartridge types react much faster.
          Short tip only types react to slow and under/overshoot to much.

          Every industrial, commercial, university etc study says for lead free you need AT LEAST 70 watts AND FAST REACTION time.

          But at least,
          BUY a REAL LEAD FREE one ONLY.
          Which are in fact mostly only the CARTRIDGE TYPE ones.

          Allready explained but will try again:

          Yes, there are 70w or even higher stations using short tips, sold as lead free.
          They indeed use lead free compatible tips.
          But, as I allready explained, the tip slides over a ceramic (mostly) element that also contains the TC.
          The TC is to far from the wettable area (part of tip used to solder).
          Temp drops, TC takes a while to register this, drops to far, braid gets stuck.
          TC registers temp drop, asks more power.
          Tips gets hotter, TC beeing furter off tip overshoots set temp.
          Flux burns, tip oxidates, gets black, heat transfer efficiency drops, making it even worse.
          Etc...

          You just don't get heat as consistant as with cartridge types where the TC is much closer to the tip.














          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Deu Sjevoo
          This is a post I did on a forum long ago but it its still applies. It s not about a soldering station getting up to 500c. I prefer one going 350 only but
          Message 4 of 15 , Jun 28, 2013
          • 0 Attachment
            This is a post I did on a forum long ago but it its still applies.
            It's not about a soldering station getting up to 500c.

            I prefer one going 350 only but having at least 70 watts, with a very fast reaction time.
            instead of one going to 500c with only 35-50 watt.
            It is a hell of a difference.
            Cartridge types react much faster.
            Short tip only types react to slow and under/overshoot to much.

            Every industrial, commercial, university etc study says for lead free you need AT LEAST 70 watts AND FAST REACTION time.

            But at least, BUY a REAL LEAD FREE one ONLY.
            Which are in fact mostly only the CARTRIDGE TYPE ones.

            Allready explained but will try again:

            Yes, there are 70w or even higher stations using short tips, sold as lead free.
            They indeed use lead free compatible tips.
            But, as I allready explained, the tip slides over a ceramic (mostly) element that also contains the TC.
            The TC is to far from the wettable area (part of tip used to solder).
            Temp drops, TC takes a while to register this, drops to far, braid gets stuck.
            TC registers temp drop, asks more power.
            Tips gets hotter, TC beeing furter off tip overshoots set temp.
            Flux burns, tip oxidates, gets black, heat transfer efficiency drops, making it even worse.
            Etc...

            You just don't get heat as consistant as with cartridge types where the TC is much closer to the tip.

















            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • KPL
            I remember there were tips with a slit (just like cut with a thin saw) in them, which were working same way. Anyway, is there any known easy method to
            Message 5 of 15 , Jul 1, 2013
            • 0 Attachment
              I remember there were tips with a slit (just like cut with a thin saw) in
              them, which were working same way.
              Anyway, is there any known easy method to create/restore that (iron?)
              coating on tips, that way anyone could modify tips to try different designs.

              In terms of tips I can highly recommend a concave tip for SMD work.
              > They go under different names such as "mini hoof", "solder well",
              > "mini spoon" and the like.
              > <http://www.jbctools.com/productes/C245938/img/tam_1/imagen_01.gif>
              > Basically you are looking at a tip cut at an angle with a concave area
              > that sucks up solder.
              > You can do all sorts of interesting things with this, from drag
              > soldering SMD parts to taking excess solder off component leads. It is
              > hard to describe but this concave section drastically extends the
              > "workable" range between too much solder on the tip and too little
              > solder on the tip. The joints will turn out with the right size fillet
              > more often with less effort.
              >
              > Another great feature about the concave tip is that you can relatively
              > easily heat both sides of chip components, such as resistors or
              > capacitors. This works better than skipping from one side to the other
              > with a pencil or chisel tip.
              >
              > Generally the tips cut at an angle like this (concave section or not)
              > give you a much wider range of applications than a similar size chisel
              > tip. You can get a big contact area if you lay them on sideways, or
              > use just the point. I don't use my chisel tips at all any more.
              >
              > ST
              >
              >
              --
              KPL


              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Stefan Trethan
              I ve played with the thought, but the manufacturers claim a multi-layer plating process. ST
              Message 6 of 15 , Jul 1, 2013
              • 0 Attachment
                I've played with the thought, but the manufacturers claim a
                multi-layer plating process.

                ST

                On Mon, Jul 1, 2013 at 11:11 PM, KPL <kpl.listes@...> wrote:
                > I remember there were tips with a slit (just like cut with a thin saw) in
                > them, which were working same way.
                > Anyway, is there any known easy method to create/restore that (iron?)
                > coating on tips, that way anyone could modify tips to try different designs.
                >
              Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.