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Re: [Electronics_101] Suggestions for 4-wire cable connecto ?

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  • Aaron Turner
    RJ45 isn t specific to Ethernet/802.3, but it is by far the most common use for it. You ll also see RJ45 used for high-density serial for terminal servers and
    Message 1 of 13 , May 14, 2013
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      RJ45 isn't specific to Ethernet/802.3, but it is by far the most common use
      for it. You'll also see RJ45 used for high-density serial for terminal
      servers and the like. For ethernet, RJ45 should only have +/- 2.5V.

      RJ11 is also an option.

      Aaron Turner
      http://synfin.net/ Twitter: @synfinatic
      https://github.com/synfinatic/tcpreplay - Pcap editing and replay tools for
      Unix & Windows
      Those who would give up essential Liberty, to purchase a little temporary
      Safety, deserve neither Liberty nor Safety.
      -- Benjamin Franklin
      "carpe diem quam minimum credula postero"


      On Tue, May 14, 2013 at 3:56 PM, Jim <jollyred@...> wrote:

      > **
      >
      >
      > Charlie,
      >
      > i gemerally try to avoid cablers and connectors that have a very
      > specific application. I the case of RJ45 that would be ethernet.
      > Tigerdirect.com is a good place to look for connectors.
      >
      > Jim
      >
      > > Rj45 ethernet leads.
      >
      >
      > > My latest gadget has an 4-pin I2C port. The first version of the
      > prototype
      > > used a micro USB port for this purpose but it finally dawned on me that
      > > someone would certainly mistake it for a charging port and plug in a hot
      > > USB cable. So I would rather use some other kind of connector - and in
      > > particular it needs to be panel mount and a connector type for which I
      > can
      > > find a ready supply of short (4-6 inches) cables. Any suggestions?
      > >
      > >
      >
      >
      >


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Don
      Hmm. now that you have me thinking along these lines, how about the RJ9, which is only 4 pins as compared to 8 for the RJ45? Is there a reason to prefer one
      Message 2 of 13 , May 14, 2013
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        Hmm. now that you have me thinking along these lines, how about the RJ9, which is only 4 pins as compared to 8 for the RJ45? Is there a reason to prefer one over the other?



        --- In Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com, Charlie Taylor <scubadogct@...> wrote:
        >
        > Rj45 ethernet leads.
        > On 14 May 2013 22:34, "Don" <DCFrench@...> wrote:
        >
        > > **
        > >
        > >
        > > My latest gadget has an 4-pin I2C port. The first version of the prototype
        > > used a micro USB port for this purpose but it finally dawned on me that
        > > someone would certainly mistake it for a charging port and plug in a hot
        > > USB cable. So I would rather use some other kind of connector - and in
        > > particular it needs to be panel mount and a connector type for which I can
        > > find a ready supply of short (4-6 inches) cables. Any suggestions?
        > >
        > >
        > >
        >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
      • raleigh_ranger
        Could you use your original USB connector and choose pinouts that would not cause damage if someone connected a USB charger?
        Message 3 of 13 , May 14, 2013
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          Could you use your original USB connector and choose pinouts that would not cause damage if someone connected a USB charger?
        • Don
          I could actually but there is one other problem with that and it is that I am using a USB port to power the device and it could be a source of confusion for
          Message 4 of 13 , May 14, 2013
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            I could actually but there is one other problem with that and it is that I am using a USB port to power the device and it could be a source of confusion for those who plug into the wrong port - maybe not that big of a deal. But the other thing that I like about the suggestion to use an RJ9 or RJ11 is that it is incredibly easy to manufacture terminated cables of whatever length for those connectors.

            --- In Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com, "raleigh_ranger" <raleigh_ranger@...> wrote:
            >
            > Could you use your original USB connector and choose pinouts that would not cause damage if someone connected a USB charger?
            >
          • Larry Beaty
            Don, Here is my 2 cents worth. Whenever I need power connector I use the Radio Shack Molex connectors. If you notice the ears, they fold back to make a
            Message 5 of 13 , May 15, 2013
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              Don,



              Here is my 2 cents worth. Whenever I need power connector I use the Radio
              Shack Molex connectors. If you notice the ears, they fold back to make a
              chassis support.



              <http://www.radioshack.com/product/index.jsp?productId=2103250
              <http://www.radioshack.com/product/index.jsp?productId=2103250&znt_campaign=
              Category_CMS&znt_source=CAT&znt_medium=RSCOM&znt_content=CT2032231>
              &znt_campaign=Category_CMS&znt_source=CAT&znt_medium=RSCOM&znt_content=CT203
              2231>



              Larry



              From: Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com
              [mailto:Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Don
              Sent: Tuesday, May 14, 2013 11:32 PM
              To: Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: [Electronics_101] Re: Suggestions for 4-wire cable connecto ?





              I



              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • basicpoke
              Ribbon cables & connectors are compact and easy to build. Ron
              Message 6 of 13 , May 15, 2013
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                Ribbon cables & connectors are compact and easy to build.
                Ron

                --- In Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com, "Don" <DCFrench@...> wrote:
                >
                > My latest gadget has an 4-pin I2C port. The first version of the prototype used a micro USB port for this purpose but it finally dawned on me that someone would certainly mistake it for a charging port and plug in a hot USB cable. So I would rather use some other kind of connector - and in particular it needs to be panel mount and a connector type for which I can find a ready supply of short (4-6 inches) cables. Any suggestions?
                >
              • Andy
                I have to chuckle because what you folks are calling an RJ45 is not an RJ45. You are talking about the 8P8C modular connector. Everyone calls it an RJ45, but
                Message 7 of 13 , May 15, 2013
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                  I have to chuckle because what you folks are calling an RJ45 is not an
                  RJ45. You are talking about the 8P8C modular connector. Everyone
                  calls it an RJ45, but an RJ45 is not an Ethernet connector either; it
                  is a rarely used telephone circuit wired with a single telephone line.
                  The RJ designations refer to how the modular connector is used, i.e.,
                  what signals are present on its pins.

                  But try walking into a parts store and asking for an 8P8C connector.
                  Or try telling them their Ethernet cables are not RJ45's.

                  The advantage of using the 8P8C is all the parts are cheaply
                  available, even with wires attached.

                  The disadvantage is someone eventually will plug an Ethernet cable into it.

                  You might also try the smaller 4P4C modular connector, sometimes
                  called RJ9. Telephone handsets use this modular connector so there is
                  a small (but lessening) chance of someone plugging a handset into your
                  gadget. You could raid a bunch of old phones to get a supply of
                  cables. Or use the 6P4C ("RJ14") or 6P6C ("RJ25"), but that is the
                  plug shape used by most wired telephones (wired as a 6P2C or a true
                  RJ11).

                  Old Molex connectors aren't a bad idea. As noted, Radio Shack still has them.

                  Andy
                • Charlie Taylor
                  Soo.....your point is? The reast of the world commonly calls knows it buy a difgerent name than you do.....interesting...thanks for pointing ting that out. ...
                  Message 8 of 13 , May 15, 2013
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                    Soo.....your point is?

                    The reast of the world commonly calls knows it buy a difgerent name than
                    you do.....interesting...thanks for pointing ting that out.
                    On 15 May 2013 17:45, "Andy" <ai.egrps@...> wrote:

                    > **
                    >
                    >
                    > I have to chuckle because what you folks are calling an RJ45 is not an
                    > RJ45. You are talking about the 8P8C modular connector. Everyone
                    > calls it an RJ45, but an RJ45 is not an Ethernet connector either; it
                    > is a rarely used telephone circuit wired with a single telephone line.
                    > The RJ designations refer to how the modular connector is used, i.e.,
                    > what signals are present on its pins.
                    >
                    > But try walking into a parts store and asking for an 8P8C connector.
                    > Or try telling them their Ethernet cables are not RJ45's.
                    >
                    > The advantage of using the 8P8C is all the parts are cheaply
                    > available, even with wires attached.
                    >
                    > The disadvantage is someone eventually will plug an Ethernet cable into it.
                    >
                    > You might also try the smaller 4P4C modular connector, sometimes
                    > called RJ9. Telephone handsets use this modular connector so there is
                    > a small (but lessening) chance of someone plugging a handset into your
                    > gadget. You could raid a bunch of old phones to get a supply of
                    > cables. Or use the 6P4C ("RJ14") or 6P6C ("RJ25"), but that is the
                    > plug shape used by most wired telephones (wired as a 6P2C or a true
                    > RJ11).
                    >
                    > Old Molex connectors aren't a bad idea. As noted, Radio Shack still has
                    > them.
                    >
                    > Andy
                    >
                    >


                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  • CharlesD
                    How about a DIN connector? They have them large and small and as long as you avoid one with the same pin layout as a keyboard you should avoid having weird
                    Message 9 of 13 , May 15, 2013
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                      How about a DIN connector? They have them large and small and as long as you avoid one with the same pin layout as a keyboard you should avoid having weird things plugged into it. However if you use the same cable as an older keyboard there are tons of pre-made cables out there. There are lovely easy to install bulkhead connectors out there for them as well.

                      Charles


                      --- In Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com, "Don" <DCFrench@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > My latest gadget has an 4-pin I2C port. The first version of the prototype used a micro USB port for this purpose but it finally dawned on me that someone would certainly mistake it for a charging port and plug in a hot USB cable. So I would rather use some other kind of connector - and in particular it needs to be panel mount and a connector type for which I can find a ready supply of short (4-6 inches) cables. Any suggestions?
                      >
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