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Re: [Electronics_101] Re: Need simple solution to adapt 10 volt wall wart Power Supply to linear 0-10 volt

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  • John Popelish
    Sorry. That is a 2.5k to 10k pot. -- Regards, John Popelish ... [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    Message 1 of 16 , May 13, 2013
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      Sorry. That is a 2.5k to 10k pot.

      --
      Regards,

      John Popelish


      On Mon, May 13, 2013 at 10:43 AM, John Popelish <jpopelish@...> wrote:

      > Page 14, paragraph 10.5 of the manual explains how to connect a 2.5k pot
      > to three terminals to control the speed.
      >
      > --
      > Regards,
      >
      > John Popelish
      >
      >
      > On Mon, May 13, 2013 at 7:18 AM, Ya-Nvr-No <yanvrno@...> wrote:
      >
      >> Here is a link to the control with the pdf manual.
      >> I called it a VFD and this one is a frequency controller. I see all these
      >> motor control devices use some sort of 0-10 volt control. I just wanted to
      >> use a standard wall wart and create a way to vary the output instead of
      >> using my bench 0-40 volt PS. Seems to me there ought to be a way to vary
      >> the output of a Wall wart. The best I could get was 1-10 volts using 3
      >> stereo audio pots in series. Just not very pretty.
      >>
      >> sm-plus
      >> 11.5 page 19 in my manual shows a speed pot between 2-5-6 posts. But I
      >> find no reference the 10volt PS current needed. Based on 10.7 page 14 the
      >> resistance value of the pot looks to be 500ohm. And that terminal 31 is the
      >> 10 volt output load, but never see how it is being used. I will look to see
      >> if I might have a suitable pot. And give it a go.
      >>
      >> thanks guys
      >>
      >> http://www.leeson.com/Products/products/ACControls/submicroseries.html
      >>
      >>
      >>
      >>
      >>
      >> ------------------------------------
      >>
      >> Please trim excess when replyingYahoo! Groups Links
      >>
      >>
      >>
      >>
      >


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Howard Hansen
      I see John answered your question about a speed control potentiometer. However, wood turning laths commonly come with a single phase AC induction motor.
      Message 2 of 16 , May 13, 2013
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        I see John answered your question about a speed control potentiometer.
        However, wood turning laths commonly come with a single phase AC
        induction motor. Singe phase induction motors are not compatible with
        the SM-Plus variable frequency drive. What type of motor will you be using?

        The other Howard


        On 5/13/2013 6:18 AM, Ya-Nvr-No wrote:
        >
        > Here is a link to the control with the pdf manual.
        > I called it a VFD and this one is a frequency controller. I see all
        > these motor control devices use some sort of 0-10 volt control. I just
        > wanted to use a standard wall wart and create a way to vary the output
        > instead of using my bench 0-40 volt PS. Seems to me there ought to be
        > a way to vary the output of a Wall wart. The best I could get was 1-10
        > volts using 3 stereo audio pots in series. Just not very pretty.
        >
        > sm-plus
        > 11.5 page 19 in my manual shows a speed pot between 2-5-6 posts. But I
        > find no reference the 10volt PS current needed. Based on 10.7 page 14
        > the resistance value of the pot looks to be 500ohm. And that terminal
        > 31 is the 10 volt output load, but never see how it is being used. I
        > will look to see if I might have a suitable pot. And give it a go.
        >
        > thanks guys
        >
        > http://www.leeson.com/Products/products/ACControls/submicroseries.html
        >
        >



        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • CharlesD
        Most building automation controllers output your 0-10V control signal... however; I m guessing you don t have access to one. I recommend just grabbing a LM317
        Message 3 of 16 , May 13, 2013
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          Most building automation controllers output your 0-10V control signal... however; I'm guessing you don't have access to one.

          I recommend just grabbing a LM317 adjustable voltage regulator and a 12VDC wall wart ... just google for the circuit, there are at the very least thousands of low part count circuits out there.. if you're using more than two resistors and two capacitors choose something else. Google image search will help you out with that.

          Just as an FYI you know you can probably control the VFD in HAND mode and manually adjust the speed on the front panel? I imagine a small variable POT would be more handy.

          I saw another post that said there was probably 10V on the board; this is not the case. The 0-10VDC control signal (usually switchable to 4-20mA) is typically provided by the controller that is running a PID loop against some sensor (temp, air or water pressure, etc.) The drive may provide you 24VAC though as that's common and you could always rectify, filter and regulate that.

          Charles, AC0GD
          http://www.iradan.com



          --- In Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com, "Ya-Nvr-No" <yanvrno@...> wrote:
          >
          > I need a 0-10 volt supply for a 1/2HP VFD motor drive. I'd like some advice on converting/adapting a Wall Wart Power supply to accomplish this task. Using a rotary or slide handle to adjust output voltage. What are the limitations and issues to be aware of, and is this a long term viable solution to control motor speed? Not like it will be used everyday. Just a cheap way to control a wood lathe spindle drive.
          > Thanks for the help
          > Great Group
          >
        • Ya-Nvr-No
          The other end of this lathe base does use a single phase motor. I mounted a new spindle and 3 phase motor to the open end. Gives me options. I am all about
          Message 4 of 16 , May 14, 2013
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            The other end of this lathe base does use a single phase motor. I
            mounted a new spindle and 3 phase motor to the open end. Gives me options. I am all about "what if" Ya-Nvr-No = You Never Know
            www.yanvrno.com




            --- In Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com, Howard Hansen <hrhan@...> wrote:
            >
            > I see John answered your question about a speed control potentiometer.
            > However, wood turning laths commonly come with a single phase AC
            > induction motor. Singe phase induction motors are not compatible with
            > the SM-Plus variable frequency drive. What type of motor will you be using?
            >
            > The other Howard
            >
            >
            > On 5/13/2013 6:18 AM, Ya-Nvr-No wrote:
            > >
            > > Here is a link to the control with the pdf manual.
            > > I called it a VFD and this one is a frequency controller. I see all
            > > these motor control devices use some sort of 0-10 volt control. I just
            > > wanted to use a standard wall wart and create a way to vary the output
            > > instead of using my bench 0-40 volt PS. Seems to me there ought to be
            > > a way to vary the output of a Wall wart. The best I could get was 1-10
            > > volts using 3 stereo audio pots in series. Just not very pretty.
            > >
            > > sm-plus
            > > 11.5 page 19 in my manual shows a speed pot between 2-5-6 posts. But I
            > > find no reference the 10volt PS current needed. Based on 10.7 page 14
            > > the resistance value of the pot looks to be 500ohm. And that terminal
            > > 31 is the 10 volt output load, but never see how it is being used. I
            > > will look to see if I might have a suitable pot. And give it a go.
            > >
            > > thanks guys
            > >
            > > http://www.leeson.com/Products/products/ACControls/submicroseries.html
            > >
            > >
            >
            >
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
          • Ya-Nvr-No
            Thanks John, I totally missed that. hell to get old.
            Message 5 of 16 , May 14, 2013
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              Thanks John, I totally missed that. hell to get old.



              --- In Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com, John Popelish <jpopelish@...> wrote:
              >
              > Sorry. That is a 2.5k to 10k pot.
              >
              > --
              > Regards,
              >
              > John Popelish
              >
              >
              > On Mon, May 13, 2013 at 10:43 AM, John Popelish <jpopelish@...> wrote:
              >
              > > Page 14, paragraph 10.5 of the manual explains how to connect a 2.5k pot
              > > to three terminals to control the speed.
              > >
              > > --
              > > Regards,
              > >
              > > John Popelish
              > >
              > >
              > > On Mon, May 13, 2013 at 7:18 AM, Ya-Nvr-No <yanvrno@...> wrote:
              > >
              > >> Here is a link to the control with the pdf manual.
              > >> I called it a VFD and this one is a frequency controller. I see all these
              > >> motor control devices use some sort of 0-10 volt control. I just wanted to
              > >> use a standard wall wart and create a way to vary the output instead of
              > >> using my bench 0-40 volt PS. Seems to me there ought to be a way to vary
              > >> the output of a Wall wart. The best I could get was 1-10 volts using 3
              > >> stereo audio pots in series. Just not very pretty.
              > >>
              > >> sm-plus
              > >> 11.5 page 19 in my manual shows a speed pot between 2-5-6 posts. But I
              > >> find no reference the 10volt PS current needed. Based on 10.7 page 14 the
              > >> resistance value of the pot looks to be 500ohm. And that terminal 31 is the
              > >> 10 volt output load, but never see how it is being used. I will look to see
              > >> if I might have a suitable pot. And give it a go.
              > >>
              > >> thanks guys
              > >>
              > >> http://www.leeson.com/Products/products/ACControls/submicroseries.html
              > >>
              > >>
              > >>
              > >>
              > >>
              > >> ------------------------------------
              > >>
              > >> Please trim excess when replyingYahoo! Groups Links
              > >>
              > >>
              > >>
              > >>
              > >
              >
              >
              > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              >
            • Ya-Nvr-No
              I do believe this is what I was looking for. I knew there had to be a way to create a cheap 0-10v control using a wall wart. Thanks CharlesD www.yanvrno.com
              Message 6 of 16 , May 14, 2013
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                I do believe this is what I was looking for. I knew there had to be a way to create a cheap 0-10v control using a wall wart.
                Thanks CharlesD
                www.yanvrno.com




                --- In Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com, "CharlesD" <chasmd@...> wrote:
                >
                > Most building automation controllers output your 0-10V control signal... however; I'm guessing you don't have access to one.
                >
                > I recommend just grabbing a LM317 adjustable voltage regulator and a 12VDC wall wart ... just google for the circuit, there are at the very least thousands of low part count circuits out there.. if you're using more than two resistors and two capacitors choose something else. Google image search will help you out with that.
                >
                > Just as an FYI you know you can probably control the VFD in HAND mode and manually adjust the speed on the front panel? I imagine a small variable POT would be more handy.
                >
                > I saw another post that said there was probably 10V on the board; this is not the case. The 0-10VDC control signal (usually switchable to 4-20mA) is typically provided by the controller that is running a PID loop against some sensor (temp, air or water pressure, etc.) The drive may provide you 24VAC though as that's common and you could always rectify, filter and regulate that.
                >
                > Charles, AC0GD
                > http://www.iradan.com
                >
                >
                >
                > --- In Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com, "Ya-Nvr-No" <yanvrno@> wrote:
                > >
                > > I need a 0-10 volt supply for a 1/2HP VFD motor drive. I'd like some advice on converting/adapting a Wall Wart Power supply to accomplish this task. Using a rotary or slide handle to adjust output voltage. What are the limitations and issues to be aware of, and is this a long term viable solution to control motor speed? Not like it will be used everyday. Just a cheap way to control a wood lathe spindle drive.
                > > Thanks for the help
                > > Great Group
                > >
                >
              • Ya-Nvr-No
                found this video on you tube that addresses the 0 volt issue. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9kGVzOkhNGQ
                Message 7 of 16 , May 14, 2013
                • 0 Attachment
                  found this video on you tube that addresses the 0 volt issue.

                  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9kGVzOkhNGQ



                  --- In Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com, "Ya-Nvr-No" <yanvrno@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > I do believe this is what I was looking for. I knew there had to be a way to create a cheap 0-10v control using a wall wart.
                  > Thanks CharlesD
                  > www.yanvrno.com
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > --- In Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com, "CharlesD" <chasmd@> wrote:
                  > >
                  > > Most building automation controllers output your 0-10V control signal... however; I'm guessing you don't have access to one.
                  > >
                  > > I recommend just grabbing a LM317 adjustable voltage regulator and a 12VDC wall wart ... just google for the circuit, there are at the very least thousands of low part count circuits out there.. if you're using more than two resistors and two capacitors choose something else. Google image search will help you out with that.
                  > >
                  > > Just as an FYI you know you can probably control the VFD in HAND mode and manually adjust the speed on the front panel? I imagine a small variable POT would be more handy.
                  > >
                  > > I saw another post that said there was probably 10V on the board; this is not the case. The 0-10VDC control signal (usually switchable to 4-20mA) is typically provided by the controller that is running a PID loop against some sensor (temp, air or water pressure, etc.) The drive may provide you 24VAC though as that's common and you could always rectify, filter and regulate that.
                  > >
                  > > Charles, AC0GD
                  > > http://www.iradan.com
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > > --- In Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com, "Ya-Nvr-No" <yanvrno@> wrote:
                  > > >
                  > > > I need a 0-10 volt supply for a 1/2HP VFD motor drive. I'd like some advice on converting/adapting a Wall Wart Power supply to accomplish this task. Using a rotary or slide handle to adjust output voltage. What are the limitations and issues to be aware of, and is this a long term viable solution to control motor speed? Not like it will be used everyday. Just a cheap way to control a wood lathe spindle drive.
                  > > > Thanks for the help
                  > > > Great Group
                  > > >
                  > >
                  >
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