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Re: [Electronics_101] Arduino Uno, Raspberry Pi and Beaglebone Black Comparison

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  • mark hubrich
    Don t forget the pcDuino. It runs Linux or Android at 1Ghz. It can also run Arduino code from the command line or through an IDE. On May 5, 2013 10:38 PM,
    Message 1 of 14 , May 5 8:49 PM
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      Don't forget the pcDuino. It runs Linux or Android at 1Ghz. It can also run
      Arduino code from the command line or through an IDE.
      On May 5, 2013 10:38 PM, "Banibrata Dutta" <banibrata.dutta@...>
      wrote:

      > Rereading my reply, I think it came out a bit dry, which was not the
      > intention.
      >
      > Thanks to the OP, I've come to realize and read more about
      > Beaglebone-black. At $45, it is certainly a very exciting product for it's
      > capabilities. So, thanks for sharing.
      >
      >
      > On Mon, May 6, 2013 at 9:00 AM, Banibrata Dutta
      > <banibrata.dutta@...>wrote:
      >
      > > Strange, that someone would compare Arduino UNO, with RaspberryPi and
      > > Beaglebone black. It's like comparing a bicycle and two sedans.
      > > Why, because their prices are somewhat in close proximity, or that
      > > electronics-hobbyists could play with either ?
      > > Oh and BTW, there's also the Olimexino which is pretty close in that
      > price
      > > range, and packs lot more power for the Allwinner A13 version.
      > > And then there's the MSP430-G2 'Valueline' based launchpads, which IMHO
      > > are very exciting alternative, given the price points (even after the
      > steep
      > > price hike from $4.30 to $9.99). More so given that project Energia makes
      > > it as easy as an Arduino to program.
      > >
      > >
      > > On Sun, May 5, 2013 at 11:39 PM, howard.hansen <howard.hansen@...
      > >wrote:
      > >
      > >> **
      > >>
      > >>
      > >> The following link provides a comparison between an Arduino Uno,
      > >> Raspberry Pi and BeagleBone Black. With an estimated cost of $45.00 the
      > >> BeagleBone Black is a viable option for people who need additional I/O
      > >> capability.
      > >>
      > >> <
      > >>
      > http://blog.mcmelectronics.com/post/Arduino-Uno-Raspberry-Pi-and-BeagleBone-Black?trk_msg=49BTNCB8GE7KBARQBIEDU3DPV8&trk_contact=UH4QFBTSJQPSDMT58CC0EASLQ0&utm_source=Listrak&utm_medium=Email&utm_term=Books&utm_campaign=BeagleBone&utm_content=BeagleBone#.UYaYvUrLqkc
      > >> >
      > >>
      > >>
      > >>
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > --
      > > regards,
      > > Banibrata
      > > http://www.linkedin.com/in/bdutta
      > > http://twitter.com/edgeliving
      > >
      >
      >
      >
      > --
      > regards,
      > Banibrata
      > http://www.linkedin.com/in/bdutta
      > http://twitter.com/edgeliving
      >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
      >
      >
      > ------------------------------------
      >
      > Please trim excess when replyingYahoo! Groups Links
      >
      >
      >
      >


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Banibrata Dutta
      Wow, quite a few choices now. based on the Allwinner A10 and A13 SoC s. ... -- regards, Banibrata http://www.linkedin.com/in/bdutta
      Message 2 of 14 , May 5 10:27 PM
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        Wow, quite a few choices now. based on the Allwinner A10 and A13 SoC's.


        On Mon, May 6, 2013 at 9:19 AM, mark hubrich <meistro57@...> wrote:

        > **
        >
        >
        > Don't forget the pcDuino. It runs Linux or Android at 1Ghz. It can also run
        > Arduino code from the command line or through an IDE.
        > On May 5, 2013 10:38 PM, "Banibrata Dutta" <banibrata.dutta@...>
        > wrote:
        >
        >
        > > Rereading my reply, I think it came out a bit dry, which was not the
        > > intention.
        > >
        > > Thanks to the OP, I've come to realize and read more about
        > > Beaglebone-black. At $45, it is certainly a very exciting product for
        > it's
        > > capabilities. So, thanks for sharing.
        > >
        > >
        > > On Mon, May 6, 2013 at 9:00 AM, Banibrata Dutta
        > > <banibrata.dutta@...>wrote:
        > >
        > > > Strange, that someone would compare Arduino UNO, with RaspberryPi and
        > > > Beaglebone black. It's like comparing a bicycle and two sedans.
        > > > Why, because their prices are somewhat in close proximity, or that
        > > > electronics-hobbyists could play with either ?
        > > > Oh and BTW, there's also the Olimexino which is pretty close in that
        > > price
        > > > range, and packs lot more power for the Allwinner A13 version.
        > > > And then there's the MSP430-G2 'Valueline' based launchpads, which IMHO
        > > > are very exciting alternative, given the price points (even after the
        > > steep
        > > > price hike from $4.30 to $9.99). More so given that project Energia
        > makes
        > > > it as easy as an Arduino to program.
        > > >
        > > >
        > > > On Sun, May 5, 2013 at 11:39 PM, howard.hansen <
        > howard.hansen@...
        > > >wrote:
        > > >
        > > >> **
        >
        > > >>
        > > >>
        > > >> The following link provides a comparison between an Arduino Uno,
        > > >> Raspberry Pi and BeagleBone Black. With an estimated cost of $45.00
        > the
        > > >> BeagleBone Black is a viable option for people who need additional I/O
        > > >> capability.
        > > >>
        > > >> <
        > > >>
        > >
        > http://blog.mcmelectronics.com/post/Arduino-Uno-Raspberry-Pi-and-BeagleBone-Black?trk_msg=49BTNCB8GE7KBARQBIEDU3DPV8&trk_contact=UH4QFBTSJQPSDMT58CC0EASLQ0&utm_source=Listrak&utm_medium=Email&utm_term=Books&utm_campaign=BeagleBone&utm_content=BeagleBone#.UYaYvUrLqkc
        > > >> >
        > > >>
        > > >>
        > > >>
        > > >
        > > >
        > > >
        > > > --
        > > > regards,
        > > > Banibrata
        > > > http://www.linkedin.com/in/bdutta
        > > > http://twitter.com/edgeliving
        > > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > --
        > > regards,
        > > Banibrata
        > > http://www.linkedin.com/in/bdutta
        > > http://twitter.com/edgeliving
        > >
        > >
        > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > ------------------------------------
        > >
        > > Please trim excess when replyingYahoo! Groups Links
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
        >
        >



        --
        regards,
        Banibrata
        http://www.linkedin.com/in/bdutta
        http://twitter.com/edgeliving


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Michael
        Hello, it seems to me to be a very skewed comparison. Have a look at the Arduino Due, that is a very powerful contender, fast, decent memory, uarts and UsB. If
        Message 3 of 14 , May 6 1:01 AM
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          Hello,
          it seems to me to be a very skewed comparison.
          Have a look at the Arduino Due, that is a very powerful contender, fast, decent memory, uarts and UsB. If only they had added an ethernet port and then it would really be humming.

          Mike.





          --- In Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com, "howard.hansen" <howard.hansen@...> wrote:
          >
          > The following link provides a comparison between an Arduino Uno, Raspberry Pi and BeagleBone Black. With an estimated cost of $45.00 the BeagleBone Black is a viable option for people who need additional I/O capability.
          >
          > <http://blog.mcmelectronics.com/post/Arduino-Uno-Raspberry-Pi-and-BeagleBone-Black?trk_msg=49BTNCB8GE7KBARQBIEDU3DPV8&trk_contact=UH4QFBTSJQPSDMT58CC0EASLQ0&utm_source=Listrak&utm_medium=Email&utm_term=Books&utm_campaign=BeagleBone&utm_content=BeagleBone#.UYaYvUrLqkc>
          >
        • Howard Hansen
          I suspect the author s objective was to compare the BeageBone Black with 2 poplar low cost micro controller boards. As you and others have mentioned there are
          Message 4 of 14 , May 6 11:28 AM
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            I suspect the author's objective was to compare the BeageBone Black with
            2 poplar low cost micro controller boards. As you and others have
            mentioned there are other micro controller boards in the same price
            range as the BeagleBone Black. It would be interesting to see a table
            comparing the BeagleBone Black with products like the Arduino Due and
            and the A13-OLinuXino.

            It will be interesting to see if the BeagleBone Black becomes as popular
            as the Raspberry Pi. Previous versions like the Beagle Board and the
            BeagleBone never became popular products. However in niche markets like
            robotics the BeagleBone Black could be a popular product. See:
            <http://roboteurs.com/beaglebone-black-vs-raspberry-pi/>

            The other Howard


            On 5/5/2013 10:30 PM, Banibrata Dutta wrote:
            > Strange, that someone would compare Arduino UNO, with RaspberryPi and
            > Beaglebone black. It's like comparing a bicycle and two sedans.
            > Why, because their prices are somewhat in close proximity, or that
            > electronics-hobbyists could play with either ?
            > Oh and BTW, there's also the Olimexino which is pretty close in that price
            > range, and packs lot more power for the Allwinner A13 version.
            > And then there's the MSP430-G2 'Valueline' based launchpads, which IMHO are
            > very exciting alternative, given the price points (even after the steep
            > price hike from $4.30 to $9.99). More so given that project Energia makes
            > it as easy as an Arduino to program.
            >
            >
            > On Sun, May 5, 2013 at 11:39 PM, howard.hansen <howard.hansen@...>wrote:
            >
            >> **
            >>
            >>
            >> The following link provides a comparison between an Arduino Uno, Raspberry
            >> Pi and BeagleBone Black. With an estimated cost of $45.00 the BeagleBone
            >> Black is a viable option for people who need additional I/O capability.
            >>
            >> <
            >> http://blog.mcmelectronics.com/post/Arduino-Uno-Raspberry-Pi-and-BeagleBone-Black?trk_msg=49BTNCB8GE7KBARQBIEDU3DPV8&trk_contact=UH4QFBTSJQPSDMT58CC0EASLQ0&utm_source=Listrak&utm_medium=Email&utm_term=Books&utm_campaign=BeagleBone&utm_content=BeagleBone#.UYaYvUrLqkc
            >>
            >>
            >
            >
          • Howard Hansen
            -For more information on the pcDuino see: The other Howard
            Message 5 of 14 , May 6 11:43 AM
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              -For more information on the pcDuino see:
              <http://liliputing.com/2013/02/pcduino-is-a-59-single-board-pc-with-adruino-compatible-headers.html>

              The other Howard



              On 5/5/2013 10:49 PM, mark hubrich wrote:
              >
              > Don't forget the pcDuino. It runs Linux or Android at 1Ghz. It can
              > also run
              > Arduino code from the command line or through an IDE.
              > On May 5, 2013 10:38 PM, "Banibrata Dutta" <banibrata.dutta@...
              > <mailto:banibrata.dutta%40gmail.com>>
              > wrote:
              >
              > > Rereading my reply, I think it came out a bit dry, which was not the
              > > intention.
              > >
              > > Thanks to the OP, I've come to realize and read more about
              > > Beaglebone-black. At $45, it is certainly a very exciting product
              > for it's
              > > capabilities. So, thanks for sharing.
              > >
              > >
              > > On Mon, May 6, 2013 at 9:00 AM, Banibrata Dutta
              > > <banibrata.dutta@... <mailto:banibrata.dutta%40gmail.com>>wrote:
              > >
              > > > Strange, that someone would compare Arduino UNO, with RaspberryPi and
              > > > Beaglebone black. It's like comparing a bicycle and two sedans.
              > > > Why, because their prices are somewhat in close proximity, or that
              > > > electronics-hobbyists could play with either ?
              > > > Oh and BTW, there's also the Olimexino which is pretty close in that
              > > price
              > > > range, and packs lot more power for the Allwinner A13 version.
              > > > And then there's the MSP430-G2 'Valueline' based launchpads, which
              > IMHO
              > > > are very exciting alternative, given the price points (even after the
              > > steep
              > > > price hike from $4.30 to $9.99). More so given that project
              > Energia makes
              > > > it as easy as an Arduino to program.
              > > >
              > > >
              > > > On Sun, May 5, 2013 at 11:39 PM, howard.hansen
              > <howard.hansen@... <mailto:howard.hansen%40yahoo.com>
              > > >wrote:
              > > >
              > > >> **
              > > >>
              > > >>
              > > >> The following link provides a comparison between an Arduino Uno,
              > > >> Raspberry Pi and BeagleBone Black. With an estimated cost of
              > $45.00 the
              > > >> BeagleBone Black is a viable option for people who need
              > additional I/O
              > > >> capability.
              > > >>
              > > >> <
              > > >>
              > >
              > http://blog.mcmelectronics.com/post/Arduino-Uno-Raspberry-Pi-and-BeagleBone-Black?trk_msg=49BTNCB8GE7KBARQBIEDU3DPV8&trk_contact=UH4QFBTSJQPSDMT58CC0EASLQ0&utm_source=Listrak&utm_medium=Email&utm_term=Books&utm_campaign=BeagleBone&utm_content=BeagleBone#.UYaYvUrLqkc
              > > >> >
              > > >>
              > > >>
              > > >>
              > > >
              > > >
              > > >
              > > > --
              > > > regards,
              > > > Banibrata
              > > > http://www.linkedin.com/in/bdutta
              > > > http://twitter.com/edgeliving
              > > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > > --
              > > regards,
              > > Banibrata
              > > http://www.linkedin.com/in/bdutta
              > > http://twitter.com/edgeliving
              > >
              > >
              >



              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Stefan Trethan
              I haven t worked with the Raspberry Pi myself, but I was very impressed with the marketing. I ve seem them on TV (BBC World) long before the hardware was
              Message 6 of 14 , May 6 12:21 PM
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                I haven't worked with the Raspberry Pi myself, but I was very
                impressed with the marketing.
                I've seem them on TV (BBC World) long before the hardware was
                available, Farnell and RS components also pushed them very hard (it is
                rare that those two companies back one product rather than slug it out
                with competing brands).
                The exposure was comparable to a big new Apple product, which is quite
                something.

                I don't think it matters very much if others are better or cheaper or
                whatever, that alone sets the Raspberry PI apart. It's like the white
                earbuds, everyone knows what a Raspberry PI is.

                As for Banibrata's comment that they can't be fairly compared to each
                other because of vastly different specifications, of course you are
                right in a way, but these days a simple task is often accomplished
                with overkill in terms of processing power and it does not disqualify
                a solution.

                For example I made a central heating controller, I could have used a
                few mechanical thermostats to get the same function, but instead I
                chose to use an atmel based system running a RTOS with Web interface
                and everything. I could have bought the thermostats for the same
                money. The two systems couldn't be more different in terms of
                complexity and processing power, but for me they were still comparable
                because they cost roughly the same and do the same job.

                So you see, comparison doesn't have to be based on similar specs,
                similar cost is also a fair way. What you can't do is select
                competitors based purely on equal cost and then judge them purely on
                raw processing power, that wouldn't make any sense.

                ST



                On Mon, May 6, 2013 at 8:28 PM, Howard Hansen <hrhan@...> wrote:
                > I suspect the author's objective was to compare the BeageBone Black with
                > 2 poplar low cost micro controller boards. As you and others have
                > mentioned there are other micro controller boards in the same price
                > range as the BeagleBone Black. It would be interesting to see a table
                > comparing the BeagleBone Black with products like the Arduino Due and
                > and the A13-OLinuXino.
                >
                > It will be interesting to see if the BeagleBone Black becomes as popular
                > as the Raspberry Pi. Previous versions like the Beagle Board and the
                > BeagleBone never became popular products. However in niche markets like
                > robotics the BeagleBone Black could be a popular product. See:
                > <http://roboteurs.com/beaglebone-black-vs-raspberry-pi/>
                >
                > The other Howard
                >
              • Jim+
                Talking aboiut single board computers, my first compter was an ELF II. It used the RCA Cosmac chip. This was many years ago, only a few years after the first
                Message 7 of 14 , May 6 1:03 PM
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                  Talking aboiut single board computers, my first 'compter' was an ELF II.
                  It used the RCA Cosmac chip. This was many years ago, only a few years
                  after the first microprocessor came out, the Intel 4004. The Cosmac chip
                  was featured in a series of Popular Electronics articles. It had the
                  advantage of being able to be powered by a battery.

                  My Elf II had abpit 120 k of ram, not Gigabytes, not Megabytes, just k,
                  as in thousands. What substiyuted for a video monitor were two LED
                  digital displays. They displayed in Hexadecimal, base sixteen. The
                  digits zero through nine were standard LED digits, the digits A through
                  F were displayed using variations on the seven segments.

                  Programming was a bit of a PITA, but the programs were small given the
                  limited ram. the programs wer not very long. The keyboard was HEX too,
                  and you had to look up the code for each instruction then enter it. The
                  current code was displayed after you entered the second digit. But yoiu
                  couldn't be certain that you had the correct value so you had to verify
                  the codes by running through the program again. I never actually did
                  many programs with it since I didn't know much about machine language
                  programming. That's what entering the binary or Hexadevimal codes
                  directly is called.

                  The next programming level involves entering the mnemonics, like LDA FF,
                  load the accumulator with hex FF.

                  What actually reminded me of the Elf is the price you mentioned for the
                  Rasberry. My Elf cost $99. I got a Vic 20 for less than that, several
                  years later.

                  Jim


                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • Aaron Turner
                  ... Agreed. What comparisons like that really miss IMHO are things that are harder to measure: 1. Community 2. Quality and variety of 3rd party libraries 3.
                  Message 8 of 14 , May 6 1:40 PM
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                    On Mon, May 6, 2013 at 12:21 PM, Stefan Trethan <stefan_trethan@...>wrote:

                    > **
                    >
                    >
                    > So you see, comparison doesn't have to be based on similar specs,
                    > similar cost is also a fair way. What you can't do is select
                    > competitors based purely on equal cost and then judge them purely on
                    > raw processing power, that wouldn't make any sense.
                    >

                    Agreed. What comparisons like that really miss IMHO are things that are
                    harder to measure:

                    1. Community
                    2. Quality and variety of 3rd party libraries
                    3. How easy it is to learn?

                    Clearly the Pi and Beaglebone have better technical specs. But a lot of
                    projects don't need a 700Mhz CPU and tons of ram/flash. Different tools
                    for different jobs.

                    --
                    Aaron Turner
                    http://synfin.net/ Twitter: @synfinatic
                    http://tcpreplay.synfin.net/ - Pcap editing and replay tools for Unix &
                    Windows
                    Those who would give up essential Liberty, to purchase a little temporary
                    Safety, deserve neither Liberty nor Safety.
                    -- Benjamin Franklin
                    "carpe diem quam minimum credula postero"


                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  • CharlesD
                    Jim, I still have my ELF-II along with a video board, extra RAM and IO boards. I actually learned how to code microcontrollers on the CDP1802. There is a very
                    Message 9 of 14 , May 7 3:10 PM
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                      Jim,

                      I still have my ELF-II along with a video board, extra RAM and IO boards. I actually learned how to code microcontrollers on the CDP1802. There is a very active COSMAC group on yahoo if you still have yours and feel like dusting it off. Complete with scanned images of documentation. Just do a search for COSMAC, you'll find it. Programming HEX really makes you quick at hexadecimal; and you'll probably remember how much fun it was to program on keypad!

                      Charles, AC0GD

                      --- In Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com, Jim+ <jollyred@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > Talking aboiut single board computers, my first 'compter' was an ELF II.
                      > It used the RCA Cosmac chip. This was many years ago, only a few years
                      > after the first microprocessor came out, the Intel 4004. The Cosmac chip
                      > was featured in a series of Popular Electronics articles. It had the
                      > advantage of being able to be powered by a battery.
                      >
                      > My Elf II had abpit 120 k of ram, not Gigabytes, not Megabytes, just k,
                      > as in thousands. What substiyuted for a video monitor were two LED
                      > digital displays. They displayed in Hexadecimal, base sixteen. The
                      > digits zero through nine were standard LED digits, the digits A through
                      > F were displayed using variations on the seven segments.
                      >
                      > Programming was a bit of a PITA, but the programs were small given the
                      > limited ram. the programs wer not very long. The keyboard was HEX too,
                      > and you had to look up the code for each instruction then enter it. The
                      > current code was displayed after you entered the second digit. But yoiu
                      > couldn't be certain that you had the correct value so you had to verify
                      > the codes by running through the program again. I never actually did
                      > many programs with it since I didn't know much about machine language
                      > programming. That's what entering the binary or Hexadevimal codes
                      > directly is called.
                      >
                      > The next programming level involves entering the mnemonics, like LDA FF,
                      > load the accumulator with hex FF.
                      >
                      > What actually reminded me of the Elf is the price you mentioned for the
                      > Rasberry. My Elf cost $99. I got a Vic 20 for less than that, several
                      > years later.
                      >
                      > Jim
                      >
                      >
                      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      >
                    • Jim+
                      Charles, Wow, I was going to get the rom and stuff, but at that time I didn t know much about additional stuff. I think I had considered a rom and something
                      Message 10 of 14 , May 7 3:17 PM
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                        Charles,

                        Wow, I was going to get the rom and stuff, but at that time I didn't
                        know much about additional stuff. I think I had considered a rom and
                        something else, but can't remember. I don't know where the thing went. :-)

                        Jim
                        >
                        > I still have my ELF-II along with a video board, extra RAM and IO
                        > boards. I actually learned how to code microcontrollers on the
                        > CDP1802. There is a very active COSMAC group on yahoo if you still
                        > have yours and feel like dusting it off. Complete with scanned images
                        > of documentation. Just do a search for COSMAC, you'll find it.
                        > Programming HEX really makes you quick at hexadecimal; and you'll
                        > probably remember how much fun it was to program on keypad!
                        >



                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      • smilingcat90254
                        Elf probably had 12K RAM not 120K. I don t know of any uPs from that vintage had address space bigger than 16 bits. Even TMS9900, LSI-11 and several others
                        Message 11 of 14 , May 8 1:52 PM
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                          Elf probably had 12K RAM not 120K. I don't know of any uPs from that vintage had address space bigger than 16 bits. Even TMS9900, LSI-11 and several others were of slightly later vintage.

                          4004s were the first. If you looked at 2900 series of bit slice you could build yourself a mini with much bigger memory space. But you needed multiple 2901s, 2910s 2911s... ALUs were in 4 bit slice. sequencer was also in 4 bit slice. register files were also in 4 bit slice and all different chips.

                          As for comparison of Arduino, Pi, Beagleboard, Launchpad... hardware comparison is good. software support is even a bigger issue. Having a great single board computer is good but it is useless unless you can easily program it to do the things you want to do. Be it to run Android, or some RTOS or some very simple standalone Application Specific function.

                          I like the Due but I can't program additional ATSAM3's or 4's. I like the Uno/Duemilenova because I can use it as an ISP to program additional chip and port the design to a specific product and without having to buy a Uno.

                          I didn't care for launchpad by TI with their MSP430 even though I really like the architecture of MSP430. Support is scattered, their IDE is severely bloated and not easy to port. Whereas Arduino IDE has much smaller foot print, support is everywhere.

                          Pi and Beagle board again is not for me because I can't create stand alone product off of it.

                          > > I still have my ELF-II along with a video board, extra RAM and IO
                          > > boards. I actually learned how to code microcontrollers on the
                          > > CDP1802. There is a very active COSMAC group on yahoo if you still
                          > > have yours and feel like dusting it off. Complete with scanned images
                          > > of documentation. Just do a search for COSMAC, you'll find it.
                          > > Programming HEX really makes you quick at hexadecimal; and you'll
                          > > probably remember how much fun it was to program on keypad!
                          > >

                          programming in hex was NOT fun!!
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