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Re: Pro Electricians with very few correct answers

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  • raleigh_ranger
    My wife hired some electricians to rewire am old house we were living in at the time. It was originally wired in the two wire style. No third ground wire. My
    Message 1 of 10 , May 1, 2013
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      My wife hired some electricians to rewire am old house we were living in at the time. It was originally wired in the two wire style. No third ground wire.
      My wife complained that Light bulbs didn't seem to last very long.
      One of the *professional* electricians told her that was because we had no third ground wire. I told her the man is an idiot and that the real reason is because no one ever turns the lights off. LOL

      -Steve
    • Jim
      RR, That muust be a very, very old house. Wiring withoiut ground wires have bee the electical code for a long time. Jim ... [Non-text portions of this message
      Message 2 of 10 , May 1, 2013
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        RR,

        That muust be a very, very old house. Wiring withoiut ground wires have
        bee the electical code for a long time.

        Jim

        > It was originally wired in the two wire style. No third ground wire.
        >




        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • wanliker
        About 15 years ago, I rewired an old house in downtown Albuquerque, that still had a 2 wire circuit, with wires supported on Ceramic knobs, a two piece
        Message 3 of 10 , May 1, 2013
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          About 15 years ago, I rewired an old house in downtown Albuquerque, that
          still had a 2 wire circuit, with wires supported on Ceramic knobs, a two
          piece design with a small cap piece holding the wire, and a nail thru the knob
          and cap into a wood support beam.and would feed thru a stud inside of a
          ceramic tubes.
          The main circuit breaker was a knife disconnect switch, and two fuses rated
          at 20 amps each. The outside service was a vertical pipe with a feed much
          like themodern ones.
          I am willing to bet that there are still buildings here in Albuquerque, and
          surrounding towns that still have that system of wiring. As to the best
          of my knowledge the power company never inspects what is on the otherside of
          the incoming service.

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Jim
          wanliker, ... Well, those certainly sound familar. The last time I saw such was in Pekin IL, in the late sixties. I don t think that any of it was active, they
          Message 4 of 10 , May 1, 2013
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            wanliker,

            > About 15 years ago, I rewired an old house in downtown Albuquerque, that
            > still had a 2 wire circuit, with wires supported on Ceramic knobs, a two
            > piece design with a small cap piece holding the wire, and a nail thru
            > the knob
            > and cap into a wood support beam.and would feed thru a stud inside of a
            > ceramic tubes.
            >
            Well, those certainly sound familar. The last time I saw such was in
            Pekin IL, in the late sixties. I don't think that any of it was active,
            they were in the attic and most of the wires were cut short. And they
            called it 'know and tube.
            >
            > The main circuit breaker was a knife disconnect switch, and two fuses
            > rated
            >
            The house I grew up in, inDetroit, MI had a strange electrical setup.
            Ultimately I discovered that half the fuzes had jumpers under them. I
            didn't realaize that the jumpers were there at first. Later when I had
            learned more about house wiring I realized that originaly the circuits
            had fuzes on both sides of the line, so someone installed the jumpers,
            probably an electrician since it looked like a p;rofessional job. I
            don't recall whether it was a 240 VAC service but probably not.

            Not too long ago I had the electrical service entrance on my house
            replaced. They doubled the nuumber of breakers, this in a house built in
            the late seventies. I wanted to figure out which breakers affected which
            lighting and outlets but never got around to it. I even bought a toy
            walkie talkie set hoping to have someone go to each place and tell me
            which circuits went out when I tripped the breaker. Best laid plans of
            mice and men oft to awry. :-)

            Jim

            >
            > at 20 amps each. The outside service was a vertical pipe with a feed much
            > like themodern ones.
            > I am willing to bet that there are still buildings here in
            > Albuquerque, and
            > surrounding towns that still have that system of wiring. As to the best
            > of my knowledge the power company never inspects what is on the
            > otherside of
            > the incoming service.
            >



            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Stefan Trethan
            Knob and tube, ST
            Message 5 of 10 , May 1, 2013
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              Knob and tube,
              <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Knob_and_tube_wiring>

              ST

              On Thu, May 2, 2013 at 2:57 AM, Jim <jollyred@...> wrote:

              > Well, those certainly sound familar. The last time I saw such was in
              > Pekin IL, in the late sixties. I don't think that any of it was active,
              > they were in the attic and most of the wires were cut short. And they
              > called it 'know and tube.
              >>
            • wanliker
              Just be happy you did not have to reset all of the clocks, I have been in this house 35 years, and still touch the breaker to try to spot the ones that
              Message 6 of 10 , May 2, 2013
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                Just be happy you did not have to reset all of the clocks, I have been in
                this house 35 years, and still touch the breaker to try to spot the ones
                that tripped.
                And I retired as an Licensed electrician and Electrical contractor....
                bill, Alb.

                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • Kerry Wentworth
                I still have some of those ceramic knobs in my house! I don t know if anything is powered by those circuits, but they still have 120V on them. My house was
                Message 7 of 10 , May 2, 2013
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                  I still have some of those ceramic knobs in my house! I don't know if
                  anything is powered by those circuits, but they still have 120V on
                  them. My house was built in 1875.

                  Kerry


                  Jim wrote:
                  > wanliker,
                  >
                  >
                  >> About 15 years ago, I rewired an old house in downtown Albuquerque, that
                  >> still had a 2 wire circuit, with wires supported on Ceramic knobs, a two
                  >> piece design with a small cap piece holding the wire, and a nail thru
                  >> the knob
                  >> and cap into a wood support beam.and would feed thru a stud inside of a
                  >> ceramic tubes.
                  >>
                  >>
                  > Well, those certainly sound familar. The last time I saw such was in
                  > Pekin IL, in the late sixties. I don't think that any of it was active,
                  > they were in the attic and most of the wires were cut short. And they
                  > called it 'know and tube.
                  >
                  >> The main circuit breaker was a knife disconnect switch, and two fuses
                  >> rated
                  >>
                  >>
                  > The house I grew up in, inDetroit, MI had a strange electrical setup.
                  > Ultimately I discovered that half the fuzes had jumpers under them. I
                  > didn't realaize that the jumpers were there at first. Later when I had
                  > learned more about house wiring I realized that originaly the circuits
                  > had fuzes on both sides of the line, so someone installed the jumpers,
                  > probably an electrician since it looked like a p;rofessional job. I
                  > don't recall whether it was a 240 VAC service but probably not.
                  >
                  > Not too long ago I had the electrical service entrance on my house
                  > replaced. They doubled the nuumber of breakers, this in a house built in
                  > the late seventies. I wanted to figure out which breakers affected which
                  > lighting and outlets but never got around to it. I even bought a toy
                  > walkie talkie set hoping to have someone go to each place and tell me
                  > which circuits went out when I tripped the breaker. Best laid plans of
                  > mice and men oft to awry. :-)
                  >
                  > Jim
                  >
                  >
                  >> at 20 amps each. The outside service was a vertical pipe with a feed much
                  >> like themodern ones.
                  >> I am willing to bet that there are still buildings here in
                  >> Albuquerque, and
                  >> surrounding towns that still have that system of wiring. As to the best
                  >> of my knowledge the power company never inspects what is on the
                  >> otherside of
                  >> the incoming service.
                  >>
                  >>
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  >
                  >
                  >
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