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happy Pi day

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  • Ron Wright, N9EE
    Welcome to March 14, or 3.14, National Pi Day here in the United States. Pi Day started in the mid-1980s when a Larry Shaw, a physicist at the San Francisco
    Message 1 of 1 , Mar 14, 2013
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      Welcome to March 14, or 3.14, National Pi Day here in the United States.

      Pi Day started in the mid-1980s when a Larry Shaw, a physicist at the San Francisco Exploratorium, celebrated the day, marked by the first three digits of pi, by gathering fellow pi appreciators and marching in circles while eating fruit pies.

      Various celebrations and ways of marking this math-loving holiday have occurred since then. For example, MIT has often mailed its application decision letters for delivery on Pi Day. Word is that starting this year the school will post those decisions (privately) online on Pi Day at exactly 6:28pm or "Tau Time" to honor the rival numbers Pi and Tau equally.

      For something more light hearted, check out this 26 step chain reaction based on Pi-themed objects.

      Einstein, ever way ahead of the masses, really knew how to celebrate Pi Day. He was born on March 14, 1879, making this mid-March day even more significant.

      The House of Representatives passed a non-binding resolution (HRES 224) on March 12, 2009, recognizing March 14, 2009, as National Pi Day. The bill urges schools and educators to help learn about Pi and engage students in math.

      Where would the world be with pi? Probably going in "circles" (chuckle, chuckle) when it came to invention. So get your slice of the pi and enjoy the day. And mark your calendars for "Real Pi Day," March 14, 2015 at 9:26:53 am when the date and time (3.14.15, 9:26:53) will correspond with the first 10 digits of pi (3.141592653).
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