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Specialized Inverter

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  • Lucien
    Hi all It s my first time posting here. So to be clear I know next to nothing about circuits. I am very slowly learning. I have a project that I am working on,
    Message 1 of 27 , Mar 11, 2013
      Hi all It's my first time posting here. So to be clear I know next to nothing about circuits. I am very slowly learning. I have a project that I am working on, and was wondering if I could get some help. I tinker in many things including chemistry.

      Right now I'm working on a type of battery. My problem is that it puts out about between 500-550vdc @ about 50 amps.
      What I would like to do is have an inverter , that can handle these specs. I have tried looking at solar panel inverters, but all of them that will take 500v will only take about 10 amps max. I need the output to come out to 240vac and approximately 104 amps.

      I normally have a friend that draws up circuits and makes them for me but he died. So I was hoping that maybe you all could help. If these already exist and you know where I can buy one that would be appreciated too. Other details for you. I am trying to keep everything as small, or perhaps I should say as light as possible.

      The battery itself at this point is approximately 1.5 lbs. But it will go through many revisions.
      Thanks again for at least taking the time to read this, and for your responses.
    • Derek
      Just parallel the inverters to get to the output current you need. If you know nothing about electronics, jumping in an making a 240Vac inverter is a huge
      Message 2 of 27 , Mar 11, 2013
        Just parallel the inverters to get to the output current you need. If
        you know nothing about electronics, jumping in an making a 240Vac
        inverter is a huge leap, especially if you are going to do a grid-tie
        system and have to phase match the output. The off-the-shelf inverters
        are designed to phase match and the output current is for that
        particular inverter. Thus you can have several inverters connected to
        your battery and each one can be doing 10A out. Put five together and
        get your 50A.

        If the battery does 50A, I believe you will not get 50A out of the
        battery. There are a lot of off-grid, battery inverter resources you
        should be able to tie into.

        Derek Koonce
        DDK Interactive Consulting Services


        On 3/11/2013 9:44 AM, Lucien wrote:
        >
        > Hi all It's my first time posting here. So to be clear I know next to
        > nothing about circuits. I am very slowly learning. I have a project
        > that I am working on, and was wondering if I could get some help. I
        > tinker in many things including chemistry.
        >
        > Right now I'm working on a type of battery. My problem is that it puts
        > out about between 500-550vdc @ about 50 amps.
        > What I would like to do is have an inverter , that can handle these
        > specs. I have tried looking at solar panel inverters, but all of them
        > that will take 500v will only take about 10 amps max. I need the
        > output to come out to 240vac and approximately 104 amps.
        >
        > I normally have a friend that draws up circuits and makes them for me
        > but he died. So I was hoping that maybe you all could help. If these
        > already exist and you know where I can buy one that would be
        > appreciated too. Other details for you. I am trying to keep everything
        > as small, or perhaps I should say as light as possible.
        >
        > The battery itself at this point is approximately 1.5 lbs. But it will
        > go through many revisions.
        > Thanks again for at least taking the time to read this, and for your
        > responses.
        >
        >



        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • AlienRelics
        That is a horrendously bad idea, connecting the output of 2 inverters together. If the outputs are even a fraction out of phase... I do agree that building
        Message 3 of 27 , Mar 11, 2013
          That is a horrendously bad idea, connecting the output of 2 inverters together. If the outputs are even a fraction out of phase...

          I do agree that building such an inverter is not for a beginner.

          Steve Greenfield AE7HD

          --- In Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com, Derek <derek@...> wrote:
          >
          > Just parallel the inverters to get to the output current you need. If
          > you know nothing about electronics, jumping in an making a 240Vac
          > inverter is a huge leap, especially if you are going to do a grid-tie
          > system and have to phase match the output. The off-the-shelf inverters
          > are designed to phase match and the output current is for that
          > particular inverter. Thus you can have several inverters connected to
          > your battery and each one can be doing 10A out. Put five together and
          > get your 50A.
          >
          > If the battery does 50A, I believe you will not get 50A out of the
          > battery. There are a lot of off-grid, battery inverter resources you
          > should be able to tie into.
          >
          > Derek Koonce
          > DDK Interactive Consulting Services
          >
          >
          > On 3/11/2013 9:44 AM, Lucien wrote:
          > >
          > > Hi all It's my first time posting here. So to be clear I know next to
          > > nothing about circuits. I am very slowly learning. I have a project
          > > that I am working on, and was wondering if I could get some help. I
          > > tinker in many things including chemistry.
          > >
          > > Right now I'm working on a type of battery. My problem is that it puts
          > > out about between 500-550vdc @ about 50 amps.
          > > What I would like to do is have an inverter , that can handle these
          > > specs. I have tried looking at solar panel inverters, but all of them
          > > that will take 500v will only take about 10 amps max. I need the
          > > output to come out to 240vac and approximately 104 amps.
          > >
          > > I normally have a friend that draws up circuits and makes them for me
          > > but he died. So I was hoping that maybe you all could help. If these
          > > already exist and you know where I can buy one that would be
          > > appreciated too. Other details for you. I am trying to keep everything
          > > as small, or perhaps I should say as light as possible.
          > >
          > > The battery itself at this point is approximately 1.5 lbs. But it will
          > > go through many revisions.
          > > Thanks again for at least taking the time to read this, and for your
          > > responses.
          > >
          > >
          >
          >
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
        • AlienRelics
          Sorry about that, I meant to say if you don t make sure they are the type to phase match... Steve Greenfield AE7HD
          Message 4 of 27 , Mar 11, 2013
            Sorry about that, I meant to say if you don't make sure they are the type to phase match...

            Steve Greenfield AE7HD

            --- In Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com, Derek <derek@...> wrote:
            >
            > Just parallel the inverters to get to the output current you need. If
            > you know nothing about electronics, jumping in an making a 240Vac
            > inverter is a huge leap, especially if you are going to do a grid-tie
            > system and have to phase match the output. The off-the-shelf inverters
            > are designed to phase match and the output current is for that
            > particular inverter. Thus you can have several inverters connected to
            > your battery and each one can be doing 10A out. Put five together and
            > get your 50A.
            >
            > If the battery does 50A, I believe you will not get 50A out of the
            > battery. There are a lot of off-grid, battery inverter resources you
            > should be able to tie into.
            >
            > Derek Koonce
            > DDK Interactive Consulting Services
            >
            >
            > On 3/11/2013 9:44 AM, Lucien wrote:
            > >
            > > Hi all It's my first time posting here. So to be clear I know next to
            > > nothing about circuits. I am very slowly learning. I have a project
            > > that I am working on, and was wondering if I could get some help. I
            > > tinker in many things including chemistry.
            > >
            > > Right now I'm working on a type of battery. My problem is that it puts
            > > out about between 500-550vdc @ about 50 amps.
            > > What I would like to do is have an inverter , that can handle these
            > > specs. I have tried looking at solar panel inverters, but all of them
            > > that will take 500v will only take about 10 amps max. I need the
            > > output to come out to 240vac and approximately 104 amps.
            > >
            > > I normally have a friend that draws up circuits and makes them for me
            > > but he died. So I was hoping that maybe you all could help. If these
            > > already exist and you know where I can buy one that would be
            > > appreciated too. Other details for you. I am trying to keep everything
            > > as small, or perhaps I should say as light as possible.
            > >
            > > The battery itself at this point is approximately 1.5 lbs. But it will
            > > go through many revisions.
            > > Thanks again for at least taking the time to read this, and for your
            > > responses.
            > >
            > >
            >
            >
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
          • Derek
            I agree if the inverters do not phase match. But for typical on-grid PV systems they should have phase matching built in. Thus, should not be a problem. I have
            Message 5 of 27 , Mar 11, 2013
              I agree if the inverters do not phase match. But for typical on-grid PV
              systems they should have phase matching built in. Thus, should not be a
              problem. I have a two inverter PV system at home with no problems. If
              you get an off-grid PV, then you will need to ensure some phase matching
              exists. Maybe one off-grid to set the frequency and the others on-grid
              to match the first.

              Derek Koonce
              DDK Interactive Consulting Services

              On 3/11/2013 4:35 PM, AlienRelics wrote:
              >
              > Sorry about that, I meant to say if you don't make sure they are the
              > type to phase match...
              >
              > Steve Greenfield AE7HD
              >
              > --- In Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com
              > <mailto:Electronics_101%40yahoogroups.com>, Derek <derek@...> wrote:
              > >
              > > Just parallel the inverters to get to the output current you need. If
              > > you know nothing about electronics, jumping in an making a 240Vac
              > > inverter is a huge leap, especially if you are going to do a grid-tie
              > > system and have to phase match the output. The off-the-shelf inverters
              > > are designed to phase match and the output current is for that
              > > particular inverter. Thus you can have several inverters connected to
              > > your battery and each one can be doing 10A out. Put five together and
              > > get your 50A.
              > >
              > > If the battery does 50A, I believe you will not get 50A out of the
              > > battery. There are a lot of off-grid, battery inverter resources you
              > > should be able to tie into.
              > >
              > > Derek Koonce
              > > DDK Interactive Consulting Services
              > >
              > >
              > > On 3/11/2013 9:44 AM, Lucien wrote:
              > > >
              > > > Hi all It's my first time posting here. So to be clear I know next to
              > > > nothing about circuits. I am very slowly learning. I have a project
              > > > that I am working on, and was wondering if I could get some help. I
              > > > tinker in many things including chemistry.
              > > >
              > > > Right now I'm working on a type of battery. My problem is that it
              > puts
              > > > out about between 500-550vdc @ about 50 amps.
              > > > What I would like to do is have an inverter , that can handle these
              > > > specs. I have tried looking at solar panel inverters, but all of them
              > > > that will take 500v will only take about 10 amps max. I need the
              > > > output to come out to 240vac and approximately 104 amps.
              > > >
              > > > I normally have a friend that draws up circuits and makes them for me
              > > > but he died. So I was hoping that maybe you all could help. If these
              > > > already exist and you know where I can buy one that would be
              > > > appreciated too. Other details for you. I am trying to keep
              > everything
              > > > as small, or perhaps I should say as light as possible.
              > > >
              > > > The battery itself at this point is approximately 1.5 lbs. But it
              > will
              > > > go through many revisions.
              > > > Thanks again for at least taking the time to read this, and for your
              > > > responses.
              > > >
              > > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              > >
              >
              >



              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • smilingcat90254
              Gentlemen, What I am very curious is the original request. specialized battery whose output is 500-550V @ 50 amp then further down the post battery weighs
              Message 6 of 27 , Mar 11, 2013
                Gentlemen,

                What I am very curious is the original request. "specialized battery whose output is 500-550V @ 50 amp" then further down the post "battery weighs in at 1.5 lb".

                Wow that's some power density and for how long? Amp-hours. just curious.

                Yes some inverters need a "pilot" signal to sync. without it, the inverter shuts down.

                As for the original poster wanting a circuit, I think he is very wise to ask someone with experience. Power circuits are not for beginners. Danger lurk in many ways and at this kind of power level, it can be quite lethal if you make a mistake.


                > > > On 3/11/2013 9:44 AM, Lucien wrote:
                > > > >
                > > > > Hi all It's my first time posting here. So to be clear I know next to
                > > > > nothing about circuits. I am very slowly learning. I have a project
                > > > > that I am working on, and was wondering if I could get some help. I
                > > > > tinker in many things including chemistry.
                > > > >
                > > > > Right now I'm working on a type of battery. My problem is that it
                > > puts
                > > > > out about between 500-550vdc @ about 50 amps.
                > > > > What I would like to do is have an inverter , that can handle these
                > > > > specs. I have tried looking at solar panel inverters, but all of them
                > > > > that will take 500v will only take about 10 amps max. I need the
                > > > > output to come out to 240vac and approximately 104 amps.
                > > > >
                > > > > I normally have a friend that draws up circuits and makes them for me
                > > > > but he died. So I was hoping that maybe you all could help. If these
                > > > > already exist and you know where I can buy one that would be
                > > > > appreciated too. Other details for you. I am trying to keep
                > > everything
                > > > > as small, or perhaps I should say as light as possible.
                > > > >
                > > > > The battery itself at this point is approximately 1.5 lbs. But it
                > > will
                > > > > go through many revisions.
                > > > > Thanks again for at least taking the time to read this, and for your
                > > > > responses.
                > > > >
              • Derek
                I saw that 1.5 pound battery note as well and figured it had to be some type of typo, unless he is looking at another type of power source. Even then, at 1.5
                Message 7 of 27 , Mar 11, 2013
                  I saw that 1.5 pound battery note as well and figured it had to be some type of typo, unless he is looking at another type of power source. Even then, at 1.5 pounds, that has to be some miracle type source to get 500V and 50A together. Now, if it is 500V OR 50A, then the game changes entirely.

                  Derek Koonce
                  DDK Interactive Consulting Services



                  --- In Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com, "smilingcat90254" <smilingcat@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > Gentlemen,
                  >
                  > What I am very curious is the original request. "specialized battery whose output is 500-550V @ 50 amp" then further down the post "battery weighs in at 1.5 lb".
                  >
                  > Wow that's some power density and for how long? Amp-hours. just curious.
                  >
                  > Yes some inverters need a "pilot" signal to sync. without it, the inverter shuts down.
                  >
                  > As for the original poster wanting a circuit, I think he is very wise to ask someone with experience. Power circuits are not for beginners. Danger lurk in many ways and at this kind of power level, it can be quite lethal if you make a mistake.
                  >
                  >
                  > > > > On 3/11/2013 9:44 AM, Lucien wrote:
                  > > > > >
                  > > > > > Hi all It's my first time posting here. So to be clear I know next to
                  > > > > > nothing about circuits. I am very slowly learning. I have a project
                  > > > > > that I am working on, and was wondering if I could get some help. I
                  > > > > > tinker in many things including chemistry.
                  > > > > >
                  > > > > > Right now I'm working on a type of battery. My problem is that it
                  > > > puts
                  > > > > > out about between 500-550vdc @ about 50 amps.
                  > > > > > What I would like to do is have an inverter , that can handle these
                  > > > > > specs. I have tried looking at solar panel inverters, but all of them
                  > > > > > that will take 500v will only take about 10 amps max. I need the
                  > > > > > output to come out to 240vac and approximately 104 amps.
                  > > > > >
                  > > > > > I normally have a friend that draws up circuits and makes them for me
                  > > > > > but he died. So I was hoping that maybe you all could help. If these
                  > > > > > already exist and you know where I can buy one that would be
                  > > > > > appreciated too. Other details for you. I am trying to keep
                  > > > everything
                  > > > > > as small, or perhaps I should say as light as possible.
                  > > > > >
                  > > > > > The battery itself at this point is approximately 1.5 lbs. But it
                  > > > will
                  > > > > > go through many revisions.
                  > > > > > Thanks again for at least taking the time to read this, and for your
                  > > > > > responses.
                  > > > > >
                  >
                • John Popelish
                  ... (snip) Yes, my mouth fell open in the middle of chewing a bite of supper, when I read that. I have been waiting for the O.P. to correct a typo, before
                  Message 8 of 27 , Mar 11, 2013
                    On 03/11/2013 11:55 PM, smilingcat90254 wrote:
                    > Gentlemen,
                    >
                    > What I am very curious is the original request.
                    > "specialized battery whose output is 500-550V @ 50 amp"
                    > then further down the post "battery weighs in at 1.5
                    > lb".
                    >
                    > Wow that's some power density and for how long?
                    > Amp-hours. just curious.
                    (snip)

                    Yes, my mouth fell open in the middle of chewing a bite of
                    supper, when I read that. I have been waiting for the O.P.
                    to correct a typo, before responding. Either that, or he
                    has invented Mister Fusion, in the thermos bottle size.

                    --
                    Regards,

                    John Popelish
                  • lilacbarn
                    A battery that can deliver 50A at 500V or so and weighs in at 1.5 Lbs could also be called a capacitor ! Depends on how much energy we are talking about.
                    Message 9 of 27 , Mar 12, 2013
                      A "battery" that can deliver 50A at 500V or so and weighs in at 1.5 Lbs could also be called a "capacitor"! Depends on how much energy we are talking about. Invertors for old fashioned flash guns were not too unlike that - especially the pro versions that had to recharge very quickly.
                      Geoff.

                      --- In Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com, "smilingcat90254" <smilingcat@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > Gentlemen,
                      >
                      > What I am very curious is the original request. "specialized battery whose output is 500-550V @ 50 amp" then further down the post "battery weighs in at 1.5 lb".
                      >
                      > Wow that's some power density and for how long? Amp-hours. just curious.
                      >
                      > Yes some inverters need a "pilot" signal to sync. without it, the inverter shuts down.
                      >
                      > As for the original poster wanting a circuit, I think he is very wise to ask someone with experience. Power circuits are not for beginners. Danger lurk in many ways and at this kind of power level, it can be quite lethal if you make a mistake.
                      >
                      >
                      > > > > On 3/11/2013 9:44 AM, Lucien wrote:
                      > > > > >
                      > > > > > Hi all It's my first time posting here. So to be clear I know next to
                      > > > > > nothing about circuits. I am very slowly learning. I have a project
                      > > > > > that I am working on, and was wondering if I could get some help. I
                      > > > > > tinker in many things including chemistry.
                      > > > > >
                      > > > > > Right now I'm working on a type of battery. My problem is that it
                      > > > puts
                      > > > > > out about between 500-550vdc @ about 50 amps.
                      > > > > > What I would like to do is have an inverter , that can handle these
                      > > > > > specs. I have tried looking at solar panel inverters, but all of them
                      > > > > > that will take 500v will only take about 10 amps max. I need the
                      > > > > > output to come out to 240vac and approximately 104 amps.
                      > > > > >
                      > > > > > I normally have a friend that draws up circuits and makes them for me
                      > > > > > but he died. So I was hoping that maybe you all could help. If these
                      > > > > > already exist and you know where I can buy one that would be
                      > > > > > appreciated too. Other details for you. I am trying to keep
                      > > > everything
                      > > > > > as small, or perhaps I should say as light as possible.
                      > > > > >
                      > > > > > The battery itself at this point is approximately 1.5 lbs. But it
                      > > > will
                      > > > > > go through many revisions.
                      > > > > > Thanks again for at least taking the time to read this, and for your
                      > > > > > responses.
                      > > > > >
                      >
                    • Lucien
                      Thank you all for the input. I have no delusion about my ability to build electronics. I do understand it enough to know I am way over my head, and would
                      Message 10 of 27 , Mar 12, 2013
                        Thank you all for the input. I have no delusion about my ability to build electronics. I do understand it enough to know I am way over my head, and would probably become corpsified if i where the one to attempt it. I think I would rather keep living.

                        Having all of your input means a great deal to me. It is great to know I can at least ask your opinions and get good, solid, grounded answers.

                        Several had questions about the power source. So I will give a little more information. If you can't tell I am a tinkerer or inventor if you will. (I like the term tinkerer better.) So to clear some things up. 500vdc at 50amps, amps 5kwh, size 48mm diameter, 65mm length. The 1.5 lbs was just a guess at the weight, and yes it is a type of fusion. If the rest of the math is correct. Then this should last for 40 to 50 years. Only time will tell how the numbers really play out though.

                        This is exactly why I was asking for help. Beyond the chemical side of this the electronics is beyond me at this time. I hope this answers any of the questions asked. I'm sure it may spring up some more but, Since you all where helping me with information and such. You deserve some of the answers.

                        And to make things clear, and I apologize for not putting this in my first post. I am aiming at hooking this up to the mains of a home. So split phase I believe it's called. Is what I am aiming for.

                        Again thank you all for your input.





                        --- In Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com, "lilacbarn" <lilacbarn@...> wrote:
                        >
                        > A "battery" that can deliver 50A at 500V or so and weighs in at 1.5 Lbs could also be called a "capacitor"! Depends on how much energy we are talking about. Invertors for old fashioned flash guns were not too unlike that - especially the pro versions that had to recharge very quickly.
                        > Geoff.
                        >
                        > --- In Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com, "smilingcat90254" <smilingcat@> wrote:
                        > >
                        > > Gentlemen,
                        > >
                        > > What I am very curious is the original request. "specialized battery whose output is 500-550V @ 50 amp" then further down the post "battery weighs in at 1.5 lb".
                        > >
                        > > Wow that's some power density and for how long? Amp-hours. just curious.
                        > >
                        > > Yes some inverters need a "pilot" signal to sync. without it, the inverter shuts down.
                        > >
                        > > As for the original poster wanting a circuit, I think he is very wise to ask someone with experience. Power circuits are not for beginners. Danger lurk in many ways and at this kind of power level, it can be quite lethal if you make a mistake.
                        > >
                        > >
                        > > > > > On 3/11/2013 9:44 AM, Lucien wrote:
                        > > > > > >
                        > > > > > > Hi all It's my first time posting here. So to be clear I know next to
                        > > > > > > nothing about circuits. I am very slowly learning. I have a project
                        > > > > > > that I am working on, and was wondering if I could get some help. I
                        > > > > > > tinker in many things including chemistry.
                        > > > > > >
                        > > > > > > Right now I'm working on a type of battery. My problem is that it
                        > > > > puts
                        > > > > > > out about between 500-550vdc @ about 50 amps.
                        > > > > > > What I would like to do is have an inverter , that can handle these
                        > > > > > > specs. I have tried looking at solar panel inverters, but all of them
                        > > > > > > that will take 500v will only take about 10 amps max. I need the
                        > > > > > > output to come out to 240vac and approximately 104 amps.
                        > > > > > >
                        > > > > > > I normally have a friend that draws up circuits and makes them for me
                        > > > > > > but he died. So I was hoping that maybe you all could help. If these
                        > > > > > > already exist and you know where I can buy one that would be
                        > > > > > > appreciated too. Other details for you. I am trying to keep
                        > > > > everything
                        > > > > > > as small, or perhaps I should say as light as possible.
                        > > > > > >
                        > > > > > > The battery itself at this point is approximately 1.5 lbs. But it
                        > > > > will
                        > > > > > > go through many revisions.
                        > > > > > > Thanks again for at least taking the time to read this, and for your
                        > > > > > > responses.
                        > > > > > >
                        > >
                        >
                      • Nuno T.
                        Now I m REALLY curious about that battery of your s! Is it an electret one? How did you came about 5kW? Do tell... Nuno T.
                        Message 11 of 27 , Mar 12, 2013
                          Now I'm REALLY curious about that battery of your's! Is it an electret one?
                          How did you came about 5kW? Do tell...

                          Nuno T.

                          > -----Original Message-----
                          > From: Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com
                          > [mailto:Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Lucien
                          > Sent: terça-feira, 12 de Março de 2013 16:50
                          > To: Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com
                          > Subject: [Electronics_101] Re: Specialized Inverter
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          > Thank you all for the input. I have no delusion about my
                          > ability to build electronics. I do understand it enough to
                          > know I am way over my head, and would probably become
                          > corpsified if i where the one to attempt it. I think I would
                          > rather keep living.
                          >
                          > Having all of your input means a great deal to me. It is
                          > great to know I can at least ask your opinions and get good,
                          > solid, grounded answers.
                          >
                          > Several had questions about the power source. So I will give
                          > a little more information. If you can't tell I am a tinkerer
                          > or inventor if you will. (I like the term tinkerer better.)
                          > So to clear some things up. 500vdc at 50amps, amps 5kwh, size
                          > 48mm diameter, 65mm length. The 1.5 lbs was just a guess at
                          > the weight, and yes it is a type of fusion. If the rest of
                          > the math is correct. Then this should last for 40 to 50
                          > years. Only time will tell how the numbers really play out though.
                          >
                          > This is exactly why I was asking for help. Beyond the
                          > chemical side of this the electronics is beyond me at this
                          > time. I hope this answers any of the questions asked. I'm
                          > sure it may spring up some more but, Since you all where
                          > helping me with information and such. You deserve some of the answers.
                          >
                          > And to make things clear, and I apologize for not putting
                          > this in my first post. I am aiming at hooking this up to the
                          > mains of a home. So split phase I believe it's called. Is
                          > what I am aiming for.
                          >
                          > Again thank you all for your input.
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          > --- In Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com, "lilacbarn"
                          > <lilacbarn@...> wrote:
                          > >
                          > > A "battery" that can deliver 50A at 500V or so and weighs
                          > in at 1.5 Lbs could also be called a "capacitor"! Depends on
                          > how much energy we are talking about. Invertors for old
                          > fashioned flash guns were not too unlike that - especially
                          > the pro versions that had to recharge very quickly.
                          > > Geoff.
                          > >
                          > > --- In Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com, "smilingcat90254"
                          > <smilingcat@> wrote:
                          > > >
                          > > > Gentlemen,
                          > > >
                          > > > What I am very curious is the original request.
                          > "specialized battery whose output is 500-550V @ 50 amp" then
                          > further down the post "battery weighs in at 1.5 lb".
                          > > >
                          > > > Wow that's some power density and for how long?
                          > Amp-hours. just curious.
                          > > >
                          > > > Yes some inverters need a "pilot" signal to sync. without
                          > it, the inverter shuts down.
                          > > >
                          > > > As for the original poster wanting a circuit, I think he
                          > is very wise to ask someone with experience. Power circuits
                          > are not for beginners. Danger lurk in many ways and at this
                          > kind of power level, it can be quite lethal if you make a mistake.
                          > > >
                          > > >
                          > > > > > > On 3/11/2013 9:44 AM, Lucien wrote:
                          > > > > > > >
                          > > > > > > > Hi all It's my first time posting here. So to be clear I
                          > > > > > > > know next to nothing about circuits. I am very slowly
                          > > > > > > > learning. I have a project that I am working on, and was
                          > > > > > > > wondering if I could get some help. I tinker in
                          > many things including chemistry.
                          > > > > > > >
                          > > > > > > > Right now I'm working on a type of battery. My problem is
                          > > > > > > > that it
                          > > > > > puts
                          > > > > > > > out about between 500-550vdc @ about 50 amps.
                          > > > > > > > What I would like to do is have an inverter , that can
                          > > > > > > > handle these specs. I have tried looking at solar panel
                          > > > > > > > inverters, but all of them that will take 500v will only
                          > > > > > > > take about 10 amps max. I need the output to come
                          > out to 240vac and approximately 104 amps.
                          > > > > > > >
                          > > > > > > > I normally have a friend that draws up circuits and makes
                          > > > > > > > them for me but he died. So I was hoping that
                          > maybe you all
                          > > > > > > > could help. If these already exist and you know
                          > where I can
                          > > > > > > > buy one that would be appreciated too. Other details for
                          > > > > > > > you. I am trying to keep
                          > > > > > everything
                          > > > > > > > as small, or perhaps I should say as light as possible.
                          > > > > > > >
                          > > > > > > > The battery itself at this point is approximately
                          > 1.5 lbs.
                          > > > > > > > But it
                          > > > > > will
                          > > > > > > > go through many revisions.
                          > > > > > > > Thanks again for at least taking the time to read
                          > this, and
                          > > > > > > > for your responses.
                          > > > > > > >
                          > > >
                          > >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          > ------------------------------------
                          >
                          > Please trim excess when replyingYahoo! Groups Links
                          >
                          >
                          >
                        • Jan Kok
                          Not sure what you mean by amps 5kwh. Are you saying that the total energy that could be delivered by the battery (before it needs to be recharged or
                          Message 12 of 27 , Mar 12, 2013
                            Not sure what you mean by "amps 5kwh." Are you saying that the total energy
                            that could be delivered by the battery (before it needs to be recharged or
                            refueled) would be 5kWh?

                            I have a Li-ion battery pack for a new netbook. It weighs a bit less than a
                            pound, and is rated 11.1V, 4.24Ah. That's about 47Wh of energy. So you are
                            expecting to get 100x as much out of your 1.5 pound battery?

                            If you meant to say that the battery could continuously deliver 5kW for 40
                            years, that would be rather interesting. At current retail price of about
                            10 cents per kWh, this battery would produce about $35,000 of electrical
                            power over its lifetime.

                            Either way, if you manage to pull it off, the battery manufacturers will be
                            lining up outside your door eager to talk to you. And I don't think you'll
                            need to worry about building a power inverter. The battery manufacturers
                            will gladly _give_ you one just for the privilege of talking with you!

                            Seriously: Focus on making the battery. That's the real challenge. Build a
                            prototype that delivers 1A 120VDC. You can run a 100W incandescent lamp
                            with that. If you can run the lamp for 10 hours, with a 1.5 pound battery,
                            even that would get the battery manufacturers' attention!

                            I have a friend who has been tinkering with cold fusion, or as he calls it,
                            "Low Energy Nuclear Reactions" (LENR). So far, after three years, nothing.

                            If you need some heavy water, maybe he would sell you some.

                            Good luck!

                            On Tue, Mar 12, 2013 at 10:50 AM, Lucien <lucien_lafollette@...>wrote:

                            > So to clear some things up. 500vdc at 50amps, amps 5kwh, size 48mm
                            > diameter, 65mm length. The 1.5 lbs was just a guess at the weight, and yes
                            > it is a type of fusion. If the rest of the math is correct. Then this
                            > should last for 40 to 50 years. Only time will tell how the numbers really
                            > play out though.
                            >


                            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                          • Dave C
                            Hi Lucien, I would start by finding the largest standard (not custom-built) inverter and use that in your trial. You can do time trials even with a smaller
                            Message 13 of 27 , Mar 12, 2013
                              Hi Lucien,
                              I would start by finding the largest standard (not custom-built) inverter and use that in your trial. You can do time trials even with a smaller inverter and measure KWHs (it just may take a bit longer).

                              You might look into the telecom industry to see what phone companies use to keep the phones running during power outages. Those should come in very large capacities.

                              Cheers,
                              Dave

                              -=-=-=-

                              On Mar 11, 2013, at 9:44 AM, Lucien wrote:

                              > Hi all It's my first time posting here. So to be clear I know next to nothing about circuits. I am very slowly learning. I have a project that I am working on, and was wondering if I could get some help. I tinker in many things including chemistry.
                              >
                              > Right now I'm working on a type of battery. My problem is that it puts out about between 500-550vdc @ about 50 amps.
                              > What I would like to do is have an inverter , that can handle these specs. I have tried looking at solar panel inverters, but all of them that will take 500v will only take about 10 amps max. I need the output to come out to 240vac and approximately 104 amps.
                              >
                              > I normally have a friend that draws up circuits and makes them for me but he died. So I was hoping that maybe you all could help. If these already exist and you know where I can buy one that would be appreciated too. Other details for you. I am trying to keep everything as small, or perhaps I should say as light as possible.
                              >
                              > The battery itself at this point is approximately 1.5 lbs. But it will go through many revisions.
                              > Thanks again for at least taking the time to read this, and for your responses.
                            • Lucien
                              Thank you for the advice. I will keep working on the battery, but I have tested it. On an old Reliance DC Motor 500v 30 hp. It s old but at least it runs. It s
                              Message 14 of 27 , Mar 13, 2013
                                Thank you for the advice. I will keep working on the battery, but I have tested it. On an old Reliance DC Motor 500v 30 hp. It's old but at least it runs. It's huge, and ugly it was made in the 1980s some time.

                                As far as the amps 5kwh, I was just tired when I typed it. For some reason I must have really like typing amps:} What i was trying to say is, it will put out 5kw/hr for if math is right 40- 50 year. Obviously I can't verify its life term yet. But it has ran the old dc motor for slightly over 24 hrs at this point.

                                If i remember it's specs right it is 500v 52amp 30hp.
                                Ha, here I did a quick ebay search. This is a slightly better looking one than mine.
                                http://www.ebay.com/itm/Reliance-DC-Motor-30-HP-500-VDC-Continuous-Duty-403AT-Frame-650-1950-RPM-/350120582307

                                I hope that helped clarify.

                                I would like to use it to run my shop for now. Which is part of the reason I have asked for help.


                                --- In Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com, Jan Kok <jan.kok.5y@...> wrote:
                                >
                                > Not sure what you mean by "amps 5kwh." Are you saying that the total energy
                                > that could be delivered by the battery (before it needs to be recharged or
                                > refueled) would be 5kWh?
                                >
                                > I have a Li-ion battery pack for a new netbook. It weighs a bit less than a
                                > pound, and is rated 11.1V, 4.24Ah. That's about 47Wh of energy. So you are
                                > expecting to get 100x as much out of your 1.5 pound battery?
                                >
                                > If you meant to say that the battery could continuously deliver 5kW for 40
                                > years, that would be rather interesting. At current retail price of about
                                > 10 cents per kWh, this battery would produce about $35,000 of electrical
                                > power over its lifetime.
                                >
                                > Either way, if you manage to pull it off, the battery manufacturers will be
                                > lining up outside your door eager to talk to you. And I don't think you'll
                                > need to worry about building a power inverter. The battery manufacturers
                                > will gladly _give_ you one just for the privilege of talking with you!
                                >
                                > Seriously: Focus on making the battery. That's the real challenge. Build a
                                > prototype that delivers 1A 120VDC. You can run a 100W incandescent lamp
                                > with that. If you can run the lamp for 10 hours, with a 1.5 pound battery,
                                > even that would get the battery manufacturers' attention!
                                >
                                > I have a friend who has been tinkering with cold fusion, or as he calls it,
                                > "Low Energy Nuclear Reactions" (LENR). So far, after three years, nothing.
                                >
                                > If you need some heavy water, maybe he would sell you some.
                                >
                                > Good luck!
                                >
                                > On Tue, Mar 12, 2013 at 10:50 AM, Lucien <lucien_lafollette@...>wrote:
                                >
                                > > So to clear some things up. 500vdc at 50amps, amps 5kwh, size 48mm
                                > > diameter, 65mm length. The 1.5 lbs was just a guess at the weight, and yes
                                > > it is a type of fusion. If the rest of the math is correct. Then this
                                > > should last for 40 to 50 years. Only time will tell how the numbers really
                                > > play out though.
                                > >
                                >
                                >
                                > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                >
                              • Lucien
                                Thanks a lot for the telecom idea. I hadn t thought of that. I will definitely check it out.
                                Message 15 of 27 , Mar 13, 2013
                                  Thanks a lot for the telecom idea. I hadn't thought of that. I will definitely check it out.

                                  --- In Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com, Dave C <davec2468@...> wrote:
                                  >
                                  > Hi Lucien,
                                  > I would start by finding the largest standard (not custom-built) inverter and use that in your trial. You can do time trials even with a smaller inverter and measure KWHs (it just may take a bit longer).
                                  >
                                  > You might look into the telecom industry to see what phone companies use to keep the phones running during power outages. Those should come in very large capacities.
                                  >
                                  > Cheers,
                                  > Dave
                                  >
                                  > -=-=-=-
                                  >
                                  > On Mar 11, 2013, at 9:44 AM, Lucien wrote:
                                  >
                                  > > Hi all It's my first time posting here. So to be clear I know next to nothing about circuits. I am very slowly learning. I have a project that I am working on, and was wondering if I could get some help. I tinker in many things including chemistry.
                                  > >
                                  > > Right now I'm working on a type of battery. My problem is that it puts out about between 500-550vdc @ about 50 amps.
                                  > > What I would like to do is have an inverter , that can handle these specs. I have tried looking at solar panel inverters, but all of them that will take 500v will only take about 10 amps max. I need the output to come out to 240vac and approximately 104 amps.
                                  > >
                                  > > I normally have a friend that draws up circuits and makes them for me but he died. So I was hoping that maybe you all could help. If these already exist and you know where I can buy one that would be appreciated too. Other details for you. I am trying to keep everything as small, or perhaps I should say as light as possible.
                                  > >
                                  > > The battery itself at this point is approximately 1.5 lbs. But it will go through many revisions.
                                  > > Thanks again for at least taking the time to read this, and for your responses.
                                  >
                                • Dave C
                                  For example: What country are you in
                                  Message 16 of 27 , Mar 13, 2013
                                    For example:

                                    <http://www.directindustry.com/prod/chloride-power-protection/three-phase-upss-for-telecom-applications-9166-811051.html>

                                    What country are you in Lucien? France?

                                    Dave

                                    -=-=-=-

                                    On Mar 13, 2013, at 10:09 AM, Lucien wrote:

                                    > Thanks a lot for the telecom idea. I hadn't thought of that. I will definitely check it out.
                                    >
                                    > --- In Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com, Dave C <davec2468@...> wrote:
                                    >>
                                    >> Hi Lucien,
                                    >> I would start by finding the largest standard (not custom-built) inverter and use that in your trial. You can do time trials even with a smaller inverter and measure KWHs (it just may take a bit longer).
                                    >>
                                    >> You might look into the telecom industry to see what phone companies use to keep the phones running during power outages. Those should come in very large capacities.
                                    >>
                                    >> Cheers,
                                    >> Dave
                                    >>
                                    >> -=-=-=-
                                    >>
                                    >> On Mar 11, 2013, at 9:44 AM, Lucien wrote:
                                    >>
                                    >>> Hi all It's my first time posting here. So to be clear I know next to nothing about circuits. I am very slowly learning. I have a project that I am working on, and was wondering if I could get some help. I tinker in many things including chemistry.
                                    >>>
                                    >>> Right now I'm working on a type of battery. My problem is that it puts out about between 500-550vdc @ about 50 amps.
                                    >>> What I would like to do is have an inverter , that can handle these specs. I have tried looking at solar panel inverters, but all of them that will take 500v will only take about 10 amps max. I need the output to come out to 240vac and approximately 104 amps.
                                    >>>
                                    >>> I normally have a friend that draws up circuits and makes them for me but he died. So I was hoping that maybe you all could help. If these already exist and you know where I can buy one that would be appreciated too. Other details for you. I am trying to keep everything as small, or perhaps I should say as light as possible.
                                    >>>
                                    >>> The battery itself at this point is approximately 1.5 lbs. But it will go through many revisions.
                                    >>> Thanks again for at least taking the time to read this, and for your responses.
                                    >>
                                    >
                                    >
                                    >
                                    >
                                    > ------------------------------------
                                    >
                                    > Please trim excess when replyingYahoo! Groups Links
                                    >
                                    >
                                    >
                                  • Lucien
                                    No I am in the united states. You guessed the name right though. I do have some family in France. Thanks for the link I will check it out.
                                    Message 17 of 27 , Mar 13, 2013
                                      No I am in the united states. You guessed the name right though. I do have some family in France.
                                      Thanks for the link I will check it out.
                                      --- In Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com, Dave C <davec2468@...> wrote:
                                      >
                                      > For example:
                                      >
                                      > <http://www.directindustry.com/prod/chloride-power-protection/three-phase-upss-for-telecom-applications-9166-811051.html>
                                      >
                                      > What country are you in Lucien? France?
                                      >
                                      > Dave
                                      >
                                      > -=-=-=-
                                      >
                                      > On Mar 13, 2013, at 10:09 AM, Lucien wrote:
                                      >
                                      > > Thanks a lot for the telecom idea. I hadn't thought of that. I will definitely check it out.
                                      > >
                                      > > --- In Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com, Dave C <davec2468@> wrote:
                                      > >>
                                      > >> Hi Lucien,
                                      > >> I would start by finding the largest standard (not custom-built) inverter and use that in your trial. You can do time trials even with a smaller inverter and measure KWHs (it just may take a bit longer).
                                      > >>
                                      > >> You might look into the telecom industry to see what phone companies use to keep the phones running during power outages. Those should come in very large capacities.
                                      > >>
                                      > >> Cheers,
                                      > >> Dave
                                      > >>
                                      > >> -=-=-=-
                                      > >>
                                      > >> On Mar 11, 2013, at 9:44 AM, Lucien wrote:
                                      > >>
                                      > >>> Hi all It's my first time posting here. So to be clear I know next to nothing about circuits. I am very slowly learning. I have a project that I am working on, and was wondering if I could get some help. I tinker in many things including chemistry.
                                      > >>>
                                      > >>> Right now I'm working on a type of battery. My problem is that it puts out about between 500-550vdc @ about 50 amps.
                                      > >>> What I would like to do is have an inverter , that can handle these specs. I have tried looking at solar panel inverters, but all of them that will take 500v will only take about 10 amps max. I need the output to come out to 240vac and approximately 104 amps.
                                      > >>>
                                      > >>> I normally have a friend that draws up circuits and makes them for me but he died. So I was hoping that maybe you all could help. If these already exist and you know where I can buy one that would be appreciated too. Other details for you. I am trying to keep everything as small, or perhaps I should say as light as possible.
                                      > >>>
                                      > >>> The battery itself at this point is approximately 1.5 lbs. But it will go through many revisions.
                                      > >>> Thanks again for at least taking the time to read this, and for your responses.
                                      > >>
                                      > >
                                      > >
                                      > >
                                      > >
                                      > > ------------------------------------
                                      > >
                                      > > Please trim excess when replyingYahoo! Groups Links
                                      > >
                                      > >
                                      > >
                                      >
                                    • Donald H Locker
                                      A better load (consistent, cheap, reliable) for testing is a simple resistance. A motor s power consumption depends too much on its efficiency and the attached
                                      Message 18 of 27 , Mar 13, 2013
                                        A better load (consistent, cheap, reliable) for testing is a simple resistance.

                                        A motor's power consumption depends too much on its efficiency and the attached load. A 30HP motor can _deliver_ up to 30HP at its rated speed, consuming more than 30HP of electric power. If no load is attached to the motor shaft, the power consumed will depend on the condition of the motor and its bearings and may or may not be anywhere near 30HP.

                                        A resistor provides a known load, every time. Getting rid of the heat will be a bit of a challenge, but boiling water is effective.

                                        Donald.
                                        --
                                        *Plain Text* email -- it's an accessibility issue
                                        () no proprietary attachments; no html mail
                                        /\ ascii ribbon campaign - <www.asciiribbon.org>

                                        ----- Original Message -----
                                        > From: "Lucien" <lucien_lafollette@...>
                                        > To: "Electronics 101" <Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com>
                                        > Sent: Wednesday, March 13, 2013 1:06:30 PM
                                        > Subject: [Electronics_101] Re: Specialized Inverter
                                        > Thank you for the advice. I will keep working on the battery, but I
                                        > have tested it. On an old Reliance DC Motor 500v 30 hp. It's old but
                                        > at least it runs. It's huge, and ugly it was made in the 1980s some
                                        > time.
                                        >
                                        > As far as the amps 5kwh, I was just tired when I typed it. For some
                                        > reason I must have really like typing amps:} What i was trying to say
                                        > is, it will put out 5kw/hr for if math is right 40- 50 year. Obviously
                                        > I can't verify its life term yet. But it has ran the old dc motor for
                                        > slightly over 24 hrs at this point.
                                        >
                                        > If i remember it's specs right it is 500v 52amp 30hp.
                                        > Ha, here I did a quick ebay search. This is a slightly better looking
                                        > one than mine.
                                        > http://www.ebay.com/itm/Reliance-DC-Motor-30-HP-500-VDC-Continuous-Duty-403AT-Frame-650-1950-RPM-/350120582307
                                        >
                                        > I hope that helped clarify.
                                        >
                                        > I would like to use it to run my shop for now. Which is part of the
                                        > reason I have asked for help.
                                        >
                                        >
                                        > --- In Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com, Jan Kok <jan.kok.5y@...>
                                        > wrote:
                                        > >
                                        > > Not sure what you mean by "amps 5kwh." Are you saying that the total
                                        > > energy
                                        > > that could be delivered by the battery (before it needs to be
                                        > > recharged or
                                        > > refueled) would be 5kWh?
                                        > >
                                        > > I have a Li-ion battery pack for a new netbook. It weighs a bit less
                                        > > than a
                                        > > pound, and is rated 11.1V, 4.24Ah. That's about 47Wh of energy. So
                                        > > you are
                                        > > expecting to get 100x as much out of your 1.5 pound battery?
                                        > >
                                        > > If you meant to say that the battery could continuously deliver 5kW
                                        > > for 40
                                        > > years, that would be rather interesting. At current retail price of
                                        > > about
                                        > > 10 cents per kWh, this battery would produce about $35,000 of
                                        > > electrical
                                        > > power over its lifetime.
                                        > >
                                        > > Either way, if you manage to pull it off, the battery manufacturers
                                        > > will be
                                        > > lining up outside your door eager to talk to you. And I don't think
                                        > > you'll
                                        > > need to worry about building a power inverter. The battery
                                        > > manufacturers
                                        > > will gladly _give_ you one just for the privilege of talking with
                                        > > you!
                                        > >
                                        > > Seriously: Focus on making the battery. That's the real challenge.
                                        > > Build a
                                        > > prototype that delivers 1A 120VDC. You can run a 100W incandescent
                                        > > lamp
                                        > > with that. If you can run the lamp for 10 hours, with a 1.5 pound
                                        > > battery,
                                        > > even that would get the battery manufacturers' attention!
                                        > >
                                        > > I have a friend who has been tinkering with cold fusion, or as he
                                        > > calls it,
                                        > > "Low Energy Nuclear Reactions" (LENR). So far, after three years,
                                        > > nothing.
                                        > >
                                        > > If you need some heavy water, maybe he would sell you some.
                                        > >
                                        > > Good luck!
                                        > >
                                        > > On Tue, Mar 12, 2013 at 10:50 AM, Lucien
                                        > > <lucien_lafollette@...>wrote:
                                        > >
                                        > > > So to clear some things up. 500vdc at 50amps, amps 5kwh, size 48mm
                                        > > > diameter, 65mm length. The 1.5 lbs was just a guess at the weight,
                                        > > > and yes
                                        > > > it is a type of fusion. If the rest of the math is correct. Then
                                        > > > this
                                        > > > should last for 40 to 50 years. Only time will tell how the
                                        > > > numbers really
                                        > > > play out though.
                                        > > >
                                        > >
                                        > >
                                        > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                        > >
                                        >
                                        >
                                        >
                                        > ------------------------------------
                                        >
                                        > Please trim excess when replyingYahoo! Groups Links
                                        >
                                        >
                                        >
                                      • Lucien
                                        You are right, that is an excellent point. I know for a fact that the motor bearings are not in great condition. Hell I was just glad that it ran it at all:}
                                        Message 19 of 27 , Mar 13, 2013
                                          You are right, that is an excellent point. I know for a fact that the motor bearings are not in great condition. Hell I was just glad that it ran it at all:} But more testing is obviously needed.

                                          --- In Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com, Donald H Locker <dhlocker@...> wrote:
                                          >
                                          > A better load (consistent, cheap, reliable) for testing is a simple resistance.
                                          >
                                          > A motor's power consumption depends too much on its efficiency and the attached load. A 30HP motor can _deliver_ up to 30HP at its rated speed, consuming more than 30HP of electric power. If no load is attached to the motor shaft, the power consumed will depend on the condition of the motor and its bearings and may or may not be anywhere near 30HP.
                                          >
                                          > A resistor provides a known load, every time. Getting rid of the heat will be a bit of a challenge, but boiling water is effective.
                                          >
                                          > Donald.
                                          > --
                                          > *Plain Text* email -- it's an accessibility issue
                                          > () no proprietary attachments; no html mail
                                          > /\ ascii ribbon campaign - <www.asciiribbon.org>
                                          >
                                          > ----- Original Message -----
                                          > > From: "Lucien" <lucien_lafollette@...>
                                          > > To: "Electronics 101" <Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com>
                                          > > Sent: Wednesday, March 13, 2013 1:06:30 PM
                                          > > Subject: [Electronics_101] Re: Specialized Inverter
                                          > > Thank you for the advice. I will keep working on the battery, but I
                                          > > have tested it. On an old Reliance DC Motor 500v 30 hp. It's old but
                                          > > at least it runs. It's huge, and ugly it was made in the 1980s some
                                          > > time.
                                          > >
                                          > > As far as the amps 5kwh, I was just tired when I typed it. For some
                                          > > reason I must have really like typing amps:} What i was trying to say
                                          > > is, it will put out 5kw/hr for if math is right 40- 50 year. Obviously
                                          > > I can't verify its life term yet. But it has ran the old dc motor for
                                          > > slightly over 24 hrs at this point.
                                          > >
                                          > > If i remember it's specs right it is 500v 52amp 30hp.
                                          > > Ha, here I did a quick ebay search. This is a slightly better looking
                                          > > one than mine.
                                          > > http://www.ebay.com/itm/Reliance-DC-Motor-30-HP-500-VDC-Continuous-Duty-403AT-Frame-650-1950-RPM-/350120582307
                                          > >
                                          > > I hope that helped clarify.
                                          > >
                                          > > I would like to use it to run my shop for now. Which is part of the
                                          > > reason I have asked for help.
                                          > >
                                          > >
                                          > > --- In Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com, Jan Kok <jan.kok.5y@>
                                          > > wrote:
                                          > > >
                                          > > > Not sure what you mean by "amps 5kwh." Are you saying that the total
                                          > > > energy
                                          > > > that could be delivered by the battery (before it needs to be
                                          > > > recharged or
                                          > > > refueled) would be 5kWh?
                                          > > >
                                          > > > I have a Li-ion battery pack for a new netbook. It weighs a bit less
                                          > > > than a
                                          > > > pound, and is rated 11.1V, 4.24Ah. That's about 47Wh of energy. So
                                          > > > you are
                                          > > > expecting to get 100x as much out of your 1.5 pound battery?
                                          > > >
                                          > > > If you meant to say that the battery could continuously deliver 5kW
                                          > > > for 40
                                          > > > years, that would be rather interesting. At current retail price of
                                          > > > about
                                          > > > 10 cents per kWh, this battery would produce about $35,000 of
                                          > > > electrical
                                          > > > power over its lifetime.
                                          > > >
                                          > > > Either way, if you manage to pull it off, the battery manufacturers
                                          > > > will be
                                          > > > lining up outside your door eager to talk to you. And I don't think
                                          > > > you'll
                                          > > > need to worry about building a power inverter. The battery
                                          > > > manufacturers
                                          > > > will gladly _give_ you one just for the privilege of talking with
                                          > > > you!
                                          > > >
                                          > > > Seriously: Focus on making the battery. That's the real challenge.
                                          > > > Build a
                                          > > > prototype that delivers 1A 120VDC. You can run a 100W incandescent
                                          > > > lamp
                                          > > > with that. If you can run the lamp for 10 hours, with a 1.5 pound
                                          > > > battery,
                                          > > > even that would get the battery manufacturers' attention!
                                          > > >
                                          > > > I have a friend who has been tinkering with cold fusion, or as he
                                          > > > calls it,
                                          > > > "Low Energy Nuclear Reactions" (LENR). So far, after three years,
                                          > > > nothing.
                                          > > >
                                          > > > If you need some heavy water, maybe he would sell you some.
                                          > > >
                                          > > > Good luck!
                                          > > >
                                          > > > On Tue, Mar 12, 2013 at 10:50 AM, Lucien
                                          > > > <lucien_lafollette@>wrote:
                                          > > >
                                          > > > > So to clear some things up. 500vdc at 50amps, amps 5kwh, size 48mm
                                          > > > > diameter, 65mm length. The 1.5 lbs was just a guess at the weight,
                                          > > > > and yes
                                          > > > > it is a type of fusion. If the rest of the math is correct. Then
                                          > > > > this
                                          > > > > should last for 40 to 50 years. Only time will tell how the
                                          > > > > numbers really
                                          > > > > play out though.
                                          > > > >
                                          > > >
                                          > > >
                                          > > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                          > > >
                                          > >
                                          > >
                                          > >
                                          > > ------------------------------------
                                          > >
                                          > > Please trim excess when replyingYahoo! Groups Links
                                          > >
                                          > >
                                          > >
                                          >
                                        • Dave C
                                          I would use several 1500 watt oil-filled portable room heaters (those with a thermostat control and wheels). Great constant resistance source. If you want 240
                                          Message 20 of 27 , Mar 13, 2013
                                            I would use several 1500 watt oil-filled portable room heaters (those with a thermostat control and wheels). Great constant resistance source.

                                            If you want 240 volt loads look into buying heaters from France (c; or other European supplier) or China (via e-Bay?). I guess any country except in N. America, or Japan.

                                            Maybe there's some commercial kitchen electric stoves? ovens? How about a pottery kiln?

                                            Then there's a small foundry furnace? ::

                                            http://ufdy.com/furnace/index.html

                                            Dave

                                            -=-=-=-

                                            On Mar 13, 2013, at 5:53 PM, Donald H Locker wrote:

                                            > A resistor provides a known load, every time. Getting rid of the heat will be a bit of a challenge, but boiling water is effective.
                                            >
                                            > Donald.
                                          • Dave C
                                            Lucien, This is not a rechargeable battery, I presume? Is it one time use ? Dave
                                            Message 21 of 27 , Mar 14, 2013
                                              Lucien,
                                              This is not a rechargeable battery, I presume? Is it "one time use"?

                                              Dave
                                            • Lucien
                                              Dave, You are correct. One time use. However you can turn this battery completely off. If it is off it will not send any voltage or current. No leakage because
                                              Message 22 of 27 , Mar 14, 2013
                                                Dave,

                                                You are correct. One time use. However you can turn this battery completely off. If it is off it will not send any voltage or current. No leakage because you didn't use it. Put it in a closet for 100 years you can still use it, and get it's full life.
                                                Use it for 30 years, turn it off. Use it 70 years later, for the other 20 years of output left.

                                                I hope that made sense. Sorry I have been on a great lack of sleep lately.


                                                --- In Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com, Dave C <davec2468@...> wrote:
                                                >
                                                > Lucien,
                                                > This is not a rechargeable battery, I presume? Is it "one time use"?
                                                >
                                                > Dave
                                                >
                                              • Dave C
                                                You can apply for a patent now, can t you? You don t need to know the KWH. It s the technology that you apparently have already figured out. (I want to learn
                                                Message 23 of 27 , Mar 14, 2013
                                                  You can apply for a patent now, can't you? You don't need to know the KWH. It's the technology that you apparently have already figured out.

                                                  (I want to learn all about the details of your battery... now!)

                                                  Dave

                                                  On Mar 14, 2013, at 1:03 PM, Lucien wrote:

                                                  > You are correct. One time use. However you can turn this battery completely off. If it is off it will not send any voltage or current. No leakage because you didn't use it. Put it in a closet for 100 years you can still use it, and get it's full life.
                                                  > Use it for 30 years, turn it off. Use it 70 years later, for the other 20 years of output left.
                                                  >
                                                  > I hope that made sense. Sorry I have been on a great lack of sleep lately.
                                                  >
                                                  >
                                                  > --- In Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com, Dave C <davec2468@...> wrote:
                                                  >>
                                                  >> Lucien,
                                                  >> This is not a rechargeable battery, I presume? Is it "one time use"?
                                                  >>
                                                  >> Dave
                                                  >>
                                                  >
                                                  >
                                                  >
                                                  >
                                                  > ------------------------------------
                                                  >
                                                  > Please trim excess when replyingYahoo! Groups Links
                                                  >
                                                  >
                                                  >
                                                • jeremy youngs
                                                  copyleft it and give it to the world -- jeremy youngs [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                                  Message 24 of 27 , Mar 14, 2013
                                                    copyleft it and give it to the world


                                                    --
                                                    jeremy youngs


                                                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                                  • Terrance
                                                    We really need to learn more about this battery . Something that can produce 500V at 50A for 40 years would have to have somewhere in the neighborhood of
                                                    Message 25 of 27 , Mar 15, 2013
                                                      We really need to learn more about this "battery". Something that can produce 500V at 50A for 40 years would have to have somewhere in the neighborhood of 3x10E13 joules of energy! That's close to half the energy of the nuke that was dropped on Hiroshima...its payload weighed significantly more than 1.5lbs.

                                                      A small battery that could produce 500V at 50A for 40 HOURS would be amazing. Am I missing something?

                                                      -Terrance

                                                      --- In Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com, "Lucien" <lucien_lafollette@...> wrote:
                                                      >
                                                      >
                                                      >
                                                      >
                                                      >
                                                      > Dave,
                                                      >
                                                      > You are correct. One time use. However you can turn this battery completely off. If it is off it will not send any voltage or current. No leakage because you didn't use it. Put it in a closet for 100 years you can still use it, and get it's full life.
                                                      > Use it for 30 years, turn it off. Use it 70 years later, for the other 20 years of output left.
                                                      >
                                                      > I hope that made sense. Sorry I have been on a great lack of sleep lately.
                                                      >
                                                      >
                                                      > --- In Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com, Dave C <davec2468@> wrote:
                                                      > >
                                                      > > Lucien,
                                                      > > This is not a rechargeable battery, I presume? Is it "one time use"?
                                                      > >
                                                      > > Dave
                                                      > >
                                                      >
                                                    • Kerim F
                                                      I am afraid you missed that in the future such batteries will exist and bring with them ... their new problems ;)
                                                      Message 26 of 27 , Mar 15, 2013
                                                        I am afraid you missed that in the future such batteries will exist and bring with them ... their new problems ;)

                                                        --- In Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com, "Terrance" <evilterrance@...> wrote:
                                                        >
                                                        > We really need to learn more about this "battery". Something that can produce 500V at 50A for 40 years would have to have somewhere in the neighborhood of 3x10E13 joules of energy! That's close to half the energy of the nuke that was dropped on Hiroshima...its payload weighed significantly more than 1.5lbs.
                                                        >
                                                        > A small battery that could produce 500V at 50A for 40 HOURS would be amazing. Am I missing something?
                                                        >
                                                        > -Terrance
                                                        >
                                                        > --- In Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com, "Lucien" <lucien_lafollette@> wrote:
                                                        > >
                                                        > >
                                                        > >
                                                        > >
                                                        > >
                                                        > > Dave,
                                                        > >
                                                        > > You are correct. One time use. However you can turn this battery completely off. If it is off it will not send any voltage or current. No leakage because you didn't use it. Put it in a closet for 100 years you can still use it, and get it's full life.
                                                        > > Use it for 30 years, turn it off. Use it 70 years later, for the other 20 years of output left.
                                                        > >
                                                        > > I hope that made sense. Sorry I have been on a great lack of sleep lately.
                                                        > >
                                                        > >
                                                        > > --- In Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com, Dave C <davec2468@> wrote:
                                                        > > >
                                                        > > > Lucien,
                                                        > > > This is not a rechargeable battery, I presume? Is it "one time use"?
                                                        > > >
                                                        > > > Dave
                                                        > > >
                                                        > >
                                                        >
                                                      • Lucien
                                                        Which is exactly what I am researching on right now. There are always future problems. However I can do as much as I can now, to try to advert as many of the
                                                        Message 27 of 27 , Mar 15, 2013
                                                          Which is exactly what I am researching on right now. There are always future problems. However I can do as much as I can now, to try to advert as many of the future problems as possible.

                                                          Sometimes people do things to fix a problem, that temporarily fixes the problem, and then leaves you with a far worse one. The unfortunate part is that you can not necessarily take it back.

                                                          As they say. Just because you can do something doesn't mean that you should.



                                                          --- In Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com, "Kerim F" <ahumanbeing2000@...> wrote:
                                                          >
                                                          > I am afraid you missed that in the future such batteries will exist and bring with them ... their new problems ;)
                                                          >
                                                          > --- In Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com, "Terrance" <evilterrance@> wrote:
                                                          > >
                                                          > > We really need to learn more about this "battery". Something that can produce 500V at 50A for 40 years would have to have somewhere in the neighborhood of 3x10E13 joules of energy! That's close to half the energy of the nuke that was dropped on Hiroshima...its payload weighed significantly more than 1.5lbs.
                                                          > >
                                                          > > A small battery that could produce 500V at 50A for 40 HOURS would be amazing. Am I missing something?
                                                          > >
                                                          > > -Terrance
                                                          > >
                                                          > > --- In Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com, "Lucien" <lucien_lafollette@> wrote:
                                                          > > >
                                                          > > >
                                                          > > >
                                                          > > >
                                                          > > >
                                                          > > > Dave,
                                                          > > >
                                                          > > > You are correct. One time use. However you can turn this battery completely off. If it is off it will not send any voltage or current. No leakage because you didn't use it. Put it in a closet for 100 years you can still use it, and get it's full life.
                                                          > > > Use it for 30 years, turn it off. Use it 70 years later, for the other 20 years of output left.
                                                          > > >
                                                          > > > I hope that made sense. Sorry I have been on a great lack of sleep lately.
                                                          > > >
                                                          > > >
                                                          > > > --- In Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com, Dave C <davec2468@> wrote:
                                                          > > > >
                                                          > > > > Lucien,
                                                          > > > > This is not a rechargeable battery, I presume? Is it "one time use"?
                                                          > > > >
                                                          > > > > Dave
                                                          > > > >
                                                          > > >
                                                          > >
                                                          >
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