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Re: Prototyping surface mount circuits

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  • AlienRelics
    If you can solve the problem of getting it through the heads, it sounds promising. There are some tips on getting liquids to wet nonporous surfaces in an
    Message 1 of 23 , Feb 28, 2013
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      If you can solve the problem of getting it through the heads, it sounds promising.

      There are some tips on getting liquids to wet nonporous surfaces in an inkjet printer here:
      http://tech.groups.yahoo.com/group/Inkjet_PCB_Construction/

      Steve Greenfield AE7HD

      --- In Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com, "Naresh" <narivasant@...> wrote:
      >
      > There is no etching involved in what I'm proposing. The silver ink would have the silver solidify out of the ink as the liquid ink evaporates. Like this guy did:
      >
      > http://jordanbunker.com/archives/41
      >
      > http://colloids.matse.illinois.edu/articles/walker_jacs_2011.pdf
      >
      > Naresh
      >
    • revelation.designs
      Now that sounds like a brilliant idea. I hope you get it right. Any idea of what resolution you can reliably achieve (track thickness and inter-track spacing ?
      Message 2 of 23 , Mar 1 12:06 AM
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        Now that sounds like a brilliant idea. I hope you get it right.
        Any idea of what resolution you can reliably achieve (track thickness and inter-track spacing ?
        Regards to all,
        Dave

        --- In Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com, Derek <derek@...> wrote:
        >
        > Most printers are inkjet and will not work for copper board etching
        > since the ink will come off with water. Best to use an exposure method
        > or a dry transfer option such as Pulsar's Toner Transfer System. The
        > later will require a mirror-image and I have used for a few years. The
        > toner transfer is nice, but I always find small holes in it and it
        > usually needs some touch-up before etching.
        >
        > However....
        >
        > How would you folks take if I could offer a product that you can print,
        > using a laser printer or the local Kinko's copier. No mirror-image
        > needed. The idea is to print to a sheet that is flexible and has copper
        > on it. Then etch. Thus eliminating the straight-thu print option. To
        > stiffen the board, you just add a backing of some type. I just had an
        > idea, but I need to test it out first. I have to get the materials and
        > do some playing.
        >
        > Derek Koonce
        > DDK Interactive Consulting Services
        >
        >
        > On 2/28/2013 7:58 AM, Terrance wrote:
        >
        > > Maybe one of those little printers for printing directly onto a CD?
        > > Those are rigid and about the same thickness as PCBs.
        > >
        > > -Terrance
        > >
        > > --- In Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com
        > > <mailto:Electronics_101%40yahoogroups.com>, "Naresh" wrote:
        > >
        > > > Does anyone know, are there any cheap printers that can print
        > > directly onto a hard flat copper board?
        > > >
        > > > Naresh
        > > >
        > >
        > >
        >
        >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
      • Naresh
        Steve, Thanks for the link, very helpful! It seems like Terrance s idea about using a CD label printer can work also. I m not making a board larger than a CD.
        Message 3 of 23 , Mar 1 5:35 AM
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          Steve,

          Thanks for the link, very helpful!

          It seems like Terrance's idea about using a CD label printer can work also. I'm not making a board larger than a CD.

          Naresh
          AF5IE

          --- In Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com, "AlienRelics" <alienrelics@...> wrote:
          >
          > If you can solve the problem of getting it through the heads, it sounds promising.
          >
          > There are some tips on getting liquids to wet nonporous surfaces in an inkjet printer here:
          > http://tech.groups.yahoo.com/group/Inkjet_PCB_Construction/
          >
          > Steve Greenfield AE7HD
          >
          > --- In Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com, "Naresh" <narivasant@> wrote:
          > >
          > > There is no etching involved in what I'm proposing. The silver ink would have the silver solidify out of the ink as the liquid ink evaporates. Like this guy did:
          > >
          > > http://jordanbunker.com/archives/41
          > >
          > > http://colloids.matse.illinois.edu/articles/walker_jacs_2011.pdf
          > >
          > > Naresh
          > >
          >
        • Naresh
          I found what looks like it will work the best for me, for the short term: http://www.aoc.nrao.edu/~pharden/hobby/HG-MANHAT2.pdf Naresh
          Message 4 of 23 , Mar 1 2:37 PM
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            I found what looks like it will work the best for me, for the short term:

            http://www.aoc.nrao.edu/~pharden/hobby/HG-MANHAT2.pdf

            Naresh
          • Frank Mead
            I have used this type of construction on many projects...including up to 1 ghz...of course at that high freq. one has to keep components tight... have fun,
            Message 5 of 23 , Mar 1 3:05 PM
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              I have used this type of construction on many projects...including up to
              1 ghz...of course at that high freq. one has to keep components tight...
              have fun,
              Frank


              On Fri, Mar 1, 2013 at 4:37 PM, Naresh <narivasant@...> wrote:

              > **
              >
              >
              > I found what looks like it will work the best for me, for the short term:
              >
              > http://www.aoc.nrao.edu/~pharden/hobby/HG-MANHAT2.pdf
              >
              > Naresh
              >
              >
              >


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