Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: CME-geomagnetic storm effects on technology

Expand Messages
  • Kerim F
    And what about us, humans, and our biological electric grid ;) This reminds me a person who said, after he noticed that his car was stolen while he was in a
    Message 1 of 3 , Feb 15 7:51 PM
    • 0 Attachment
      And what about us, humans, and our biological electric grid ;)
      This reminds me a person who said, after he noticed that his car was stolen while he was in a supermarket, "What a big loss, I forgot my cell phone in it" ;)


      --- In Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com, "A6intruder@..." <A6intruder@...> wrote:
      >
      > We had the usual office discussion today of life changing scenarios after
      > seeing the meteor explode in Russia and the asteroid fly-by of earth this
      > afternoon.
      >
      > Coronal Mass Ejection (CME) came up as one of the most likely to impact our
      > current lifestyle.
      >
      > The typical thought is a real strong impact on our magnetosphere would not
      > only take out the electric grid but all our car computers, phones, PC's etc.
      >
      > My question: Given an event strong enough to take out much of the power
      > grid, would that necessarily take out every microchip around?
      >
      > My thought was the grid goes down because it is a great receiving antenna
      > and absorbs too much energy for the transformer's and other components to
      > handle. I can see any electrical device connected to the grid being at
      > risk.
      >
      > How about an off-grid solar power system? Would the inverters necessarily
      > be fried?
      >
      > If you had some warning and disconnected an inverter from every lead could
      > it then survive?
      >
      > What about a modern automobile? Would its own miles of wiring act as a big
      > antenna to fry the microprocessors within?
      >
      > How about a simple 555 chip sitting in your desk drawer?
      >
      > How about an older car with no microprocessors?
      >
      > Thanks for your thoughts!
      >
      > Dan Nicoson
      >
    • JIM HANDLEY
      Hello, Regional switching centres (not unlike Internet Severs) are used to control electricity grids. The last time I saw inside such a centre –some 20 or
      Message 2 of 3 , Feb 16 3:52 AM
      • 0 Attachment
        Hello,



        Regional switching centres (not unlike Internet Severs) are used to control
        electricity grids. The last time I saw inside such a centre �some 20 or
        more years� ago� there were several people watching �maps� on huge TV
        screens and using the information thus presented, to manually switch feeds
        and loads, according to the power demanded in their own and adjacent
        geographical areas.



        Electricity grids are huge and of course and often, their generators�
        outputs are shared internationally. Therefore, I should think that anything
        that interrupted correct commutations between such switching centres would
        plunge the whole electricity distribution system into complete chaos.
        Presumably, the EMI (electromagnetic interference) caused by an electrical
        storm and induced into the into the grid�s communications system (radio
        and/or cable) could corrupt data transmissions.



        I ain�t too sure about this �anyone know better?



        Jim.


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.