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Re: [Electronics_101] 120 vs 240

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  • Shawn Upton
    Yep, but with oil heat/hot water and gas for stove/dryer it s never been a problem.  Friends of ours might still have some of the, oh what is it called?  The
    Message 1 of 84 , Aug 1, 2012
      Yep, but with oil heat/hot water and gas for stove/dryer it's never been a problem.  Friends of ours might still have some of the, oh what is it called?  The type where it's bare wire with porcelein knobs?


      Now that I think about it, the person I was responding to said they had two 50A breakers in their service.  I have two 60A breakers on my service, which means 60A of 240 or 120A of 120.  Which makes me think that person might have 50A service instead.

      I can't say I'm enamored with how we do electricity here.  I've had a few outlets go bad; vacuum cleaner plugs where the wire gets warm seems sketchy.  Had to fix the wiring on one outlet when the twisted-wire-plus-wirenut decided to no longer make a good connection.  Or how one can run a 14g wire for a 15A circuit for as far as they'd like, regardless of voltage drop.  I guess working in instrumentation/measurement where millivolts matter does not equip me to deal with household wiring issues.

       
      Shawn Upton, KB1CKT
      NAQCC 4723


      ________________________________
      From: Kerry Wentworth <kwentworth@...>
      To: Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Tuesday, July 31, 2012 10:17 PM
      Subject: Re: [Electronics_101] 120 vs 240


       
      jong kung wrote:
      > Shawn,
      >
      >
      >
      >> 100A service? How extravagant! I
      >> have to make due with 60A for my house.
      >>
      >
      > Where do you leave? In deep woods of Island Kingdom of Upton?
      >
      >
      > Jong
      >
      >
      Not far from me, in the boonies of New Hampshire. Many old houses
      here. Mine was built in 1875, and the ones on either side of me are
      older than that. Before electricity, phones and plumbing. Mine has
      been updated, and I have 2 100 amp services (Living area and commercial
      space). On the other hand, I have cloth covered wires on ceramic
      standoffs that still carry electricity. Go figure!

      Kerry




      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Kerry Wentworth
      I was watching an episode of Star Trek The Next Generation once, and Geordi was watching his sensor readout and reported It s putting out XXX.XX mega joules
      Message 84 of 84 , Aug 7, 2012
        I was watching an episode of Star Trek The Next Generation once, and
        Geordi was watching his sensor readout and reported "It's putting out
        XXX.XX mega joules per second!" I thought someone was going to say "You
        mean XXX.XX megawatts?", but nobody did.

        Kerry


        AlienRelics wrote:
        > Doh! You are correct.... a kWhr is 3600kJ. It is a handier way of measuring energy use, both in quantity and ease of conversion as it is obvious to the casual person that 1kWhr can be a 500W load for two hours, or a 2kW load for 30 minutes.
        >
        > Steve Greenfield AE7HD
        > Derp a derp
        >
        > --- In Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com, Kerry Wentworth <kwentworth@...> wrote:
        >
        >> I thought a watt was joules per second.
        >>
        >> Kerry
        >>
        >>
        >> AlienRelics wrote:
        >>
        >>> kWhr is a measure of kilojoules, and a watt is joules per hour. It is Watts times Hours to cancel out Hours and get Joules.
        >>>
        >>> Steve Greenfield AE7HD
        >>>
        >>> --- In Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com, jong kung <jongkung01@> wrote:
        >>>
        >>>
        >>>>
        >>>>
        >>>>> Solar panels are usually used with a fluid that doesn't
        >>>>> freeze. Freezing breaks things.
        >>>>>
        >>>>>
        >>>> I think ST was talking about the design I mentioned here in Hawaii (fresh water is fed directly through the solar panel). It is the simplest and the cheapest. They re-use the old water heater (instead of getting a heat exchanger).
        >>>>
        >>>> This ONLY works in a place like Hawaii where we officially never had freezing weather (not at ocean level at least - on top of the volcanoes - it is always freezing overnight).
        >>>>
        >>>> ====
        >>>>
        >>>> Most of the islands are NOT plumbed for gas heating. So electric heating is the mainstay. But electricity here cost about $0.35 per kilowatt-hour (or is that kilowatt/hour). That's really high. I thought NYC was high at 15 cents per kilowatt-hour. So the incentive to put solar cells on houses are very high here.
        >>>>
        >>>> If people in Hawaii government has some brain, they would promote Hawaii as major solar energy research island - I think it would be ideal. Think about it, cars have no where to go but around and around the island. Perfect for gen-1 electric cars !! Often they talk about limited drive distance as major problem to electric cars. But on this island you couldn't drive off if your life depended on it.
        >>>>
        >>>> Also we have so much sun, it is easy to do research on theoretical vs practical output of solar cells for homes.
        >>>>
        >>>> Sadly, it seems that only the commercial solar companies are in on the solar band wagon here. I don't hear much about it from the university here.
        >>>>
        >>>>
        >>>> Jong
        >>>>
        >>>>
        >>>>
        >>>
        >>>
        >>>
        >
        >
        >
        >
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