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Re: 11 out of 12 MIT free online course didn't make midterms...

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  • Ron Wright, N9EE
    College electronic courses are usually radically different than what most think electronics is about. I got my BSEE long ago and half was math, calculus high
    Message 1 of 9 , May 3, 2012
      College electronic courses are usually radically different than what most think electronics is about.

      I got my BSEE long ago and half was math, calculus high level math. Had to have 2-1/2 years of math before they would let me in the classes. It was great.

      There were courses in circuit analyses that used only algebra and trig, but still much different from what some might think.

      Being able to get thru these shows ones ability to solve real intense problems and this is what engineering is all about.

      73, ron, n9ee/r


      --- In Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com, Kerry Wentworth <kwentworth@...> wrote:
      >
      > I made it. I have to admit there were times I considered quitting.
      > (like today!)
      >
      > Kerry
      >
      >
      > jongkung01 wrote:
      > > Hi there,
      > >
      > >
      > > http://www.nytimes.com/2012/05/03/education/harvard-and-mit-team-up-to-offer-free-online-courses.html
      > >
      > > The article says 120,000 people registered, but only 10,000 people took the midterm. That only 1 out of 12 - actually made it to midterm.
      > >
      > >
      > > Jong
      > >
      > >
      > >
      >
    • Nuno T.
      Somewhere after page 30 or so, I noticed that they wore NOT teaching anything usefull for me. I was going through more math just on those few pages than ever
      Message 2 of 9 , May 3, 2012
        Somewhere after page 30 or so, I noticed that they wore NOT teaching
        anything usefull for me. I was going through more math just on those few
        pages than ever needed in more than 20 years working on electronics. Lost of
        time...

        Nuno

        > -----Original Message-----
        > From: Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com
        > [mailto:Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of jongkung01
        > Sent: quinta-feira, 3 de Maio de 2012 15:06
        > To: Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com
        > Subject: [Electronics_101] 11 out of 12 MIT free online
        > course didn't make midterms...
        >
        > Hi there,
        >
        >
        > http://www.nytimes.com/2012/05/03/education/harvard-and-mit-te
        > am-up-to-offer-free-online-courses.html
        >
        > The article says 120,000 people registered, but only 10,000
        > people took the midterm. That only 1 out of 12 - actually
        > made it to midterm.
        >
        >
        > Jong
      • Derek
        With over 20 projects on my desk at work, canine search and rescue responses, ski patrol days (what I could with the wierd winter in California), and family...
        Message 3 of 9 , May 3, 2012
          With over 20 projects on my desk at work, canine search and rescue
          responses, ski patrol days (what I could with the wierd winter in
          California), and family... I did not even start. I thought about it once
          about 3 weeks after it started.

          Derek Koonce
          DDK Interactive Consulting Services



          On 5/3/2012 7:15 AM, Leon Heller wrote:
          >
          > On 03/05/2012 15:06, jongkung01 wrote:
          > > Hi there,
          > >
          > >
          > http://www.nytimes.com/2012/05/03/education/harvard-and-mit-team-up-to-offer-free-online-courses.html
          > >
          > > The article says 120,000 people registered, but only 10,000 people took
          > > the midterm. That only 1 out of 12 - actually made it to midterm.
          >
          > I registered, but never even started.
          >
          > Leon
          > --
          > Leon Heller
          > G1HSM
          >
          >


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • jong kung
          Nunu,     ... I noticed the same about Computer Science as a major too. Too much education about stuff that doesn t go directly into making a person actually
          Message 4 of 9 , May 4, 2012
            Nunu,
             
             
            > Somewhere after page 30 or so, I noticed that they wore NOT teaching
            > anything usefull for me. I was going through more math just on those few
            > pages than ever needed in more than 20 years working on electronics. Lost of
            > time...

            I noticed the same about Computer Science as a major too. Too much education about stuff that doesn't go directly into making a person actually know how to ... program.  Yes computer sciens is much MORE than programming, but first about programming (or should be).  You can argue EE degree is much more than building circuits but I think it is FIRST about circuits.
             
            I had a friend who graduated with EE degree from Ivy League school (Columbia U).  One day he called me to ask me to find a problem with his car stereo.  I was shocked - I NEVER studied electronics at this point - just little bit of electricity (plus, minus, ohms, etc.).  I did the only think I knew - check the connection. And yes, the idiots who installed his radio basically TWISTED the power wires and then taped them.  After some time, it got lose.
             
            His excuse was that after the first few classes, all his projects were done on simulators.  So on simulators, connections are always 100%.  BS !!!  I am not puttind down Columbia.  My own college (NYU) did exactly the same - all my friends who graduated with CS degree was incompetient programmers.  They were NOT taught the basics.
             
            If you ask me this might be a consistent problem in many fields of study - I'm just guessing of course.
             
             
            Jong

            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Nuno T.
            Hi Jong, Agree with you all the way. The same BS teaching happens here also. I even had a teacher in my high school that knew less than me and most of my
            Message 5 of 9 , May 5, 2012
              Hi Jong,

              Agree with you all the way. The same BS teaching happens here also.

              I even had a teacher in my high school that knew less than me and most of my
              colleagues. And I knew little at the time.
              One curious episode I like to recall is one where the teacher was
              explaining, while assembling in a breadboard, the basics of switching power
              supply. After over 1 hour of extensive theory while showing the components
              and how they are connected, he connected the input to a lab bench type
              linear power supply that had two LED's, one green indicating "ON", and one
              red indicating "OVERLOAD". When he finally turned it on, nothing happened!
              He seemed to not know why and kept looking at the IC schematic. After about
              2 to 3 minutes one of my classmates asked him how was the IC supplied since
              he (the student) was not seeing a wire in the VCC pin. motive for anecdotes
              for the rest of the week! A simple resistor from the VCC pin to input + was
              necessary. Not wanting to look silly, the teacher proceeded into more theory
              about the workings of that switching power supply and started to add
              progressively higher loads and measuring the PSU coefficient of performance
              and other parameters and making some neat looking graphics. At one point,
              the red LED of the bench lab power supply started to flicker and a noise
              inside the box could be heard along with a lack of power in the beautifully
              breadboarded circuit. After another 2 to 3 minutes at it, me and several
              other classmates called his attention to the flickering red LED and noise in
              the bench power supply. His answer: "That is not important, it can still
              supply enough power to make this work". It took another classmate that
              forced him to connect an oscilloscope to the input to make him see his
              mistake. The following days the teacher found it odd why so many students
              stopped attending his class...

              I finished my graduation, but after this and other similar episodes,
              I banned public teaching from my life and started looking for the real stuff
              for myself. This MIT course seemed interesting until I noticed it was the
              same all over again.

              Nuno

              > -----Original Message-----
              > From: Reid Smith [mailto:reidsmith1953@...]
              > Sent: sexta-feira, 24 de Fevereiro de 2012 14:57
              > To: Nuno T.
              > Subject: RE: TPU
              >
              > Hi Nuno;
              >
              > Something else I forgot to mention. When I tested the ferrite
              > config.
              > I told you about. I noticed that there was a increase in the power. I
              > traced it back to my power supply. I was getting stray power from the
              > power line/power supply. That's a GOOD thing. You want it to pick up
              > stray power because that's what the device does. Even if you using a
              > spark you want the device to recieve. With out it you get nothing.
              >
              > I have a question, what is your goal? Do you want to get off the
              > grid with no more light bills??
              >
              > Reid

              > -----Original Message-----
              > From: Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com
              > [mailto:Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of jong kung
              > Sent: sábado, 5 de Maio de 2012 1:49
              > To: Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com
              > Subject: RE: [Electronics_101] 11 out of 12 MIT free online
              > course didn't make midterms...
              >
              > Nunu,
              >  
              >  
              > > Somewhere after page 30 or so, I noticed that they wore NOT
              > teaching
              > > anything usefull for me. I was going through more math just
              > on those
              > > few pages than ever needed in more than 20 years working on
              > > electronics. Lost of time...
              >
              > I noticed the same about Computer Science as a major too. Too
              > much education about stuff that doesn't go directly into
              > making a person actually know how to ... program.  Yes
              > computer sciens is much MORE than programming, but first
              > about programming (or should be).  You can argue EE degree is
              > much more than building circuits but I think it is FIRST
              > about circuits.
              >  
              > I had a friend who graduated with EE degree from Ivy League
              > school (Columbia U).  One day he called me to ask me to find
              > a problem with his car stereo.  I was shocked - I NEVER
              > studied electronics at this point - just little bit of
              > electricity (plus, minus, ohms, etc.).  I did the only think
              > I knew - check the connection. And yes, the idiots who
              > installed his radio basically TWISTED the power wires and
              > then taped them.  After some time, it got lose.
              >  
              > His excuse was that after the first few classes, all his
              > projects were done on simulators.  So on simulators,
              > connections are always 100%.  BS !!!  I am not puttind down
              > Columbia.  My own college (NYU) did exactly the same - all my
              > friends who graduated with CS degree was incompetient
              > programmers.  They were NOT taught the basics.
              >  
              > If you ask me this might be a consistent problem in many
              > fields of study - I'm just guessing of course.
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