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Re: [Electronics_101] Re: using welder to zap new life into dead ni-cad batteries

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  • jong kung
    ... 50 Vdc. It doesn t matter ... There could be some sense to this.  I have a smart charger for my NiMH batteries.   But it is too smart.  When I plug in
    Message 1 of 12 , Dec 2, 2011
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      > To me, all the guy is doing is feeding the dead


      > battery with 40 Vdc to
      50 Vdc. It doesn't matter


      > if it comes from a 200 Amp welding machine,



      > there won't be more current flowing.






      There could be some sense to this.  I have a smart charger for my NiMH
      batteries.   But it is too smart.  When I plug in my dead batteries
      (really dead from dis-use for months), the charger senses low / zero
      voltage and assumes it is internally shorted.  So it doesn't even try to
      charge it.  When this happens, I plug the AA battery in the old style
      dumb charger for about 1 minute.  That's enough to give the battery some
      voltage.  Then when I plug them into the smart charger it goes right
      into full speed charging mode.





      There are some batteries that aren't dead but the smart charger refuse
      to try. But there are batteries that are dead (really dead).  My
      Craftsman batteries are really dead.  The only charger they gave me is a
      dumb charger.  It never refuse to charge. 








      Jong










      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Andrew Mathison (Alice)
      To me, all the guy is doing is feeding the dead battery with 40 Vdc to 50 Vdc. It doesn t matter if it comes from a 200 Amp welding machine, there won t be
      Message 2 of 12 , Dec 3, 2011
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        To me, all the guy is doing is feeding the dead battery with 40 Vdc to 50
        Vdc. It doesn't matter if it comes from a 200 Amp welding machine, there
        won't be more current flowing.

        Absolutely and fully correct, but will everyone here understand why? I doubt
        it!!

        Many will still believe that you need a welding outfit!!!! DDDUUUUUHHHHH!

        Regards

        Andy




        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • corderbo1
        I rebuild my battery packs when ever they need it. Some of the cases are harder to open than others but I have always found a way. Once inside, I isolate the
        Message 3 of 12 , Dec 3, 2011
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          I rebuild my battery packs when ever they need it. Some of the cases are harder to open than others but I have always found a way. Once inside, I isolate the defective cell and replace it with an identical cell that I purchase from allbattery.com. Measure your old battery cell, Diameter, length, milliamp rating, etc. and you should be able to find a replacement and solder it into place and then put the case back on. Been doing it for years with no problems. I personally think that the "zapping" of batterys to try and clear the short that is killing a cell is dangerous and ill advised.

          Bob

          --- In Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com, jong kung <jongkung01@...> wrote:
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > > Batteries will blow up doing that ...
          >
          >
          >
          > There are a lot of people on youtube "zapping" ni-cad batteries.  None
          > of them says they will blow up.  Have you seen them blow up or have you
          > had that experience?
          >
          >
          >
          > =====
          >
          >
          >
          > > ... by a new one
          >
          >
          >
          > That's what me and my friend was trying to avoid.  My friend's DeWalt
          > battery is more expensive than some new battery + drill sets.
          >
          >
          >
          > My battery is discontinued so I cannot get it even I wanted to spend the money.
          >
          >
          >
          > Besides, we are here to learn.  It would be nice if you had a SAFE way to rejuvenate dead batteries.
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > Jong
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
        • Stefan Trethan
          Good advise, rebuilding can often result in a better-than-new pack and is much more worthwhile than this zapping business. Soldering cells without tabs is
          Message 4 of 12 , Dec 3, 2011
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            Good advise, rebuilding can often result in a better-than-new pack and
            is much more worthwhile than this zapping business.

            Soldering cells without tabs is problematic because it can easily
            damage the rubber seal on the positive end. This is not immediately
            apparent but the cell will not live long. After a time you can usually
            notice greenish or white crystals around where cells seals are
            leaking. Probably you used tabbed cells so that would not be an issue.
            I have made a spot welder for welding cells, it is very easy to make
            from an old microwave oven transformer. With that you can weld to any
            type of cell, even button cells which must never ever be soldered to
            directly, they really do explode.

            If one cell in a pack is already dead, I would not be inclined to
            change just that, there are likely others that are already weakening
            unless this is a new pack with a factory defective cell. However a
            complete set of high quality cells may cost as much as a replacement
            battery so it is not a cheap option to change them all.

            ST

            On Sat, Dec 3, 2011 at 10:21 PM, corderbo1 <corderbo@...> wrote:
            > I rebuild my battery packs when ever they need it.  Some of the cases are harder to open than others but I have always found a way.  Once inside, I isolate the defective cell and replace it with an identical cell that I purchase from allbattery.com.  Measure your old battery cell, Diameter, length, milliamp rating, etc. and you should be able to find a replacement and solder it into place and then put the case back on.  Been doing it for years with no problems.  I personally think that the "zapping" of batterys to try and clear the short that is killing a cell is dangerous and ill advised.
            >
            > Bob
            >
            > --- In Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com, jong kung <jongkung01@...> wrote:
            >>
            >>
            >>
            >>
            >>
            >> > Batteries will blow up doing that ...
            >>
            >>
            >>
            >> There are a lot of people on youtube "zapping" ni-cad batteries.  None
            >> of them says they will blow up.  Have you seen them blow up or have you
            >> had that experience?
            >>
            >>
            >>
            >> =====
            >>
            >>
            >>
            >> > ... by a new one
            >>
            >>
            >>
            >> That's what me and my friend was trying to avoid.  My friend's DeWalt
            >> battery is more expensive than some new battery + drill sets.
            >>
            >>
            >>
            >> My battery is discontinued so I cannot get it even I wanted to spend the money.
            >>
            >>
            >>
            >> Besides, we are here to learn.  It would be nice if you had a SAFE way to rejuvenate dead batteries.
            >>
            >>
            >>
            >>
            >>
            >> Jong
            >>
            >>
            >>
            >>
            >>
            >> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >>
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > ------------------------------------
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