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Re: Recommended beginners electronics class / book online and free.

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  • rtstofer
    ... But studying them won t necessarily maintain a level of interest in the hobby of electronics. Now, if the goal is BSEE/MSEE or something like that then, of
    Message 1 of 19 , Jun 1, 2011
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      --- In Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com, "AlienRelics" <alienrelics@...> wrote:
      >
      > --- In Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com, "rtstofer" <rstofer@> wrote:
      > >
      > > Learning electronics is boring; all those laws and equations just get in the way. Building stuff is exciting. Watching the lights blink and the motors turn; that's what it's about.
      > >
      >
      > I don't agree with that. I think all those laws and equations are essential to understanding what is going on. And I don't find it boring at all!




      But studying them won't necessarily maintain a level of interest in the hobby of electronics.

      Now, if the goal is BSEE/MSEE or something like that then, of course, there are well established programs. But after the first 2 semesters, the math starts getting a little intense for someone who just wants to tinker.

      I guess it comes down to the goal of studying electronics. Is it for a hobby? If so, the requirements can be quite modest. If it's for a vocation then a lot more theory (and math) will be required.

      Richard
    • John T. Blair
      ... them...online, ... Jim, No I don t. It was originally for my youngest son to go to college in. But then the rear main went, and it had and enclosed drive
      Message 2 of 19 , Jun 2, 2011
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        At 10:46 PM 6/1/2011, you wrote:

        >Have you got any pics of your rambler? If so, I would love to see
        them...online,
        >obviously.

        Jim,

        No I don't. It was originally for my youngest son to go to college
        in. But then the
        rear main went, and it had and enclosed drive shaft. The tube was attached to
        the rear end. So it was a real pain to do.

        A buddy of mine in SC. wanted it so he bought it from me.

        Some of these are actually my cars, some are my dad's. But he's 87 and started
        selling off some of his stuff also, like the 48 TR1800 and the #4
        Midget. It really
        hurt when he got rid of the TR. It had been in the family over 40
        yrs, and was
        supposed to go to me when he passed away. After he sold that, he bought a
        '40 Packard 120 Coupe. It turned out to be a pile of crap, so I've
        spent most of
        my spare time over the last 4 years restoring it. But I don't like
        it, I want the
        TR back.

        My wife has been on me to get rid of some of the old cars, so I've been slowly
        thinning the heard, especially since I retired. Got rid of the 3
        Spitfires and 3
        Saab Sonetts.

        So right now we are down to:
        '40 Packard, '64 Harley (one lunger), '65 Morgan (I've had that since I as 19),
        '75 Bricklin SV-1 (I've been working on it since '95 - it's still in
        pieces), then the
        daily drivers, '89 Ford F150 (our tow truck), '95 Voyager Van (wife's
        car), '95 Taurus wagon (my youngest son drives), '02 Taurus (dad's),
        '06 xB (mine).

        John

        ----------

        John T. Blair WA4OHZ email: jblair1948@...
        Va. Beach, Va
        Phone: (757) 495-8229

        48 TR1800 48 #4 Midget 65 Morgan 4/4 Series V (B1106)
        75 Bricklin SV1 (#0887) 77 Spitfire 71 Saab Sonett III
        65 Rambler Classic

        Morgan: www.team.net/www/morgan
        Bricklin: www.bricklin.org

        If you can read this - Thank a teacher!
        If you are reading it in English - Thank a Vet!!

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • John T. Blair
        ... for a hobby? If ... then a lot more ... I got my ham license when I was 13 (I m now 63) and I had to learn a lot of the basic algebraic equations. Boring
        Message 3 of 19 , Jun 2, 2011
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          >I guess it comes down to the goal of studying electronics. Is it
          for a hobby? If
          >so, the requirements can be quite modest. If it's for a vocation
          then a lot more
          >theory (and math) will be required.

          I got my ham license when I was 13 (I'm now 63) and I had to learn a
          lot of the
          basic algebraic equations. Boring yes, but I've found that I've
          used the basic
          equations (Ohms law, Power equation, resistors in series & parallel,
          etc.) a lot
          over the years for working on cars, the house, etc.

          When I got to my high school physics, the semister on electricity and
          electronics
          was very easy as I already knew the equations, etc.

          Then I went to college, and got a degree in Engineering. Again the basics I
          learned back getting my ham ticket gave me a great foundation and helped pull
          me through a lot of the math.

          Like so much of what you learn, you won't use it all. But you should
          be exposed
          to it.

          John

          John T. Blair WA4OHZ email: jblair1948@...
          Va. Beach, Va
          Phone: (757) 495-8229

          48 TR1800 48 #4 Midget 65 Morgan 4/4 Series V (B1106)
          75 Bricklin SV1 (#0887) 77 Spitfire 71 Saab Sonett III
          65 Rambler Classic

          Morgan: www.team.net/www/morgan
          Bricklin: www.bricklin.org

          If you can read this - Thank a teacher!
          If you are reading it in English - Thank a Vet!!
        • D. Daniel McGlothin
          ... is online and free. ... I haven t read the other replies, and so this might be duplicate information. You might consider the Stamps In Class series from
          Message 4 of 19 , Jun 2, 2011
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            > ...suggestions for a beginners class /Book for basic electronics that
            is online and free.
            > If they develop into a series even better.

            I haven't read the other replies, and so this might be duplicate
            information.

            You might consider the Stamps In Class series from Parallax.
            Overview: http://www.parallax.com/Education
            Current Stamps In Class: http://www.parallax.com/Default.aspx?tabid=362
            Translated or Retired:
            http://www.parallax.com/Education/TutorialsTranslations/tabid/535/Default.aspx

            Their texts are free; obviously they would like to sell you their parts,
            but the information can be (easily) adapted.

            The Parallax products have been the subject on an ongoing series if
            articles in Nuts & Volts. Most of the columns are freely available at
            the Parallax website
            http://www.parallax.com/Resources/NutsVoltsColumns/tabid/272/Default.aspx
            While not as orderly as a disciplined text, they do offer a series of
            bite-sized learning opportunities on some of the breadth of electronics.

            Just a satisfied consumer.
            Daniel
          • Marc R.J. Brevoort
            ... The circuit simulator applet on http://www.falstad.com/circuit/ helped me a LOT. Highly recommended. Best, Marc
            Message 5 of 19 , Jun 3, 2011
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              On Wed, 1 Jun 2011, kb7anl wrote:

              > Hi Looking for suggestions for a begginers class /Book for basic electronics that is online and free.
              > If they develop into a series even better.
              > This may be me and my son.

              The circuit simulator applet on http://www.falstad.com/circuit/ helped me
              a LOT. Highly recommended.

              Best,
              Marc
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