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Re: [Electronics_101] forgetful p/t hobbyist Q, using xtra loud tel ringer

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  • lists
    In article , ... I have a notice which I stick to the inside of our porch door (glass panel) which says If no reply try garage . (my
    Message 1 of 11 , Apr 1, 2011
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      In article <in35dd+uj2l@...>,
      jon <jesteele1948@...> wrote:
      > Thanks for any guidance to this guy who hasn't soldered in 20 yrs.

      I have a notice which I stick to the inside of our porch door (glass
      panel) which says "If no reply try garage". (my workshop - down the side
      of the house at the back)

      --
      Stuart Winsor

      Midland RISC OS show - Sat July 9th 2011

      http://mug.riscos.org/show11/MUGshow.html
    • jon
      Kerry, I think you ve filled in my information needs so I can proceed. Now to find my parts box to see if I have the resistor(s) and my soldering iron and a
      Message 2 of 11 , Apr 2, 2011
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        Kerry,
        I think you've filled in my information needs so I can proceed. Now to find my parts box to see if I have the resistor(s) and my soldering iron and a little time and a little workspace, and I'm all set.
        Thanks to all.
        Jon

        --- In Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com, Kerry Wentworth <kwentworth@...> wrote:
        >
        > Well, 1B is 8000 ohms at 60Hz, so .9B is 8800 ohms at 60Hz. To drop
        > 120VAC to 90V, you could put a 3000 ohm resistor in series. It would
        > need to be 1/2W or more, or use 2 1500 ohm 1/4W.
        >
        > I needed the ringer equivalency to calculate the resistor value. Also,
        > that it was a type B to work properly on 60Hz.
        >
        > Kerry
        >
        >
        >
        > jon wrote:
        > >
        > >
        > > Kerry,
        > > I thank you for contributing something useful (a way of isolation) to
        > > my inquiry, but I don't see from what you wrote, how I generate 90vAC
        > > for that 2nd winding. I didn't want to buy a transformer with 90vAC
        > > output. It's my understanding that 90vAC only comes thru the phone
        > > line for ringing purposes, not all the time. If the phone went out, I
        > > certainly don't want to be have this new doorbell gizmo disabled.
        > >
        > > That's why I asked about converting 12vDC to 90vAC.
        > >
        > > The REN is 0.9B; the ringer is also marked 0.6A 8-))
        > > I'm feeling a little less helpless now.
        > >
        > > Jon
        > >
        > > --- In Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com
        > > <mailto:Electronics_101%40yahoogroups.com>, Kerry Wentworth
        > > <kwentworth@> wrote:
        > > >
        > > > First, check out this:
        > > >
        > > > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ringer_equivalence_number
        > > >
        > > > From that, you can figure out the current required by your ringer.
        > > >
        > > > You could hook it up with a relay, DPDT type.
        > > > Common1 and Common2 to ringer.
        > > > NC1 and NC2 to phone line
        > > > NO1 and NO2 to 90V 20Hz source (or whatever you use)
        > > > Coil energized by by door bell button
        > > >
        > > > Kerry
        > > >
        > > >
        > > >
        > > > jon wrote:
        > > > >
        > > > >
        > > > > (I searched the group history for appropriate transformer info but
        > > > > found nothing.)
        > > > >
        > > > > I got an extra loud phone ringer from the phone co. and want to drive
        > > > > it off my doorbell switch box.
        > > ...
        > > > > Thanks for any guidance to this guy who hasn't soldered in 20 yrs.
        > > > >
        > > > > Jon, in San Jose, CA
        > > > >
        > > > >
        > >
        >
        >
        >
        > --
        > Internal Virus Database is out-of-date.
        > Checked by AVG Anti-Virus.
        > Version: 7.0.289 / Virus Database: 267.11.13 - Release Date: 10/6/05
        >
      • Kerry Wentworth
        Just be real careful when working with 120V. It has killed before, and will kill again. Kerry ... -- Internal Virus Database is out-of-date. Checked by AVG
        Message 3 of 11 , Apr 2, 2011
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          Just be real careful when working with 120V. It has killed before, and
          will kill again.

          Kerry



          jon wrote:
          >
          >
          > Kerry,
          > I think you've filled in my information needs so I can proceed. Now to
          > find my parts box to see if I have the resistor(s) and my soldering
          > iron and a little time and a little workspace, and I'm all set.
          > Thanks to all.
          > Jon
          >
          > --- In Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com
          > <mailto:Electronics_101%40yahoogroups.com>, Kerry Wentworth
          > <kwentworth@...> wrote:
          > >
          > > Well, 1B is 8000 ohms at 60Hz, so .9B is 8800 ohms at 60Hz. To drop
          > > 120VAC to 90V, you could put a 3000 ohm resistor in series. It would
          > > need to be 1/2W or more, or use 2 1500 ohm 1/4W.
          > >
          > > I needed the ringer equivalency to calculate the resistor value. Also,
          > > that it was a type B to work properly on 60Hz.
          > >
          > > Kerry
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > > jon wrote:
          > > >
          > > >
          > > > Kerry,
          > > > I thank you for contributing something useful (a way of isolation) to
          > > > my inquiry, but I don't see from what you wrote, how I generate 90vAC
          > > > for that 2nd winding. I didn't want to buy a transformer with 90vAC
          > > > output. It's my understanding that 90vAC only comes thru the phone
          > > > line for ringing purposes, not all the time. If the phone went out, I
          > > > certainly don't want to be have this new doorbell gizmo disabled.
          > > >
          > > > That's why I asked about converting 12vDC to 90vAC.
          > > >
          > > > The REN is 0.9B; the ringer is also marked 0.6A 8-))
          > > > I'm feeling a little less helpless now.
          > > >
          > > > Jon
          > > >
          > > > --- In Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com
          > <mailto:Electronics_101%40yahoogroups.com>
          > > > <mailto:Electronics_101%40yahoogroups.com>, Kerry Wentworth
          > > > <kwentworth@> wrote:
          > > > >
          > > > > First, check out this:
          > > > >
          > > > > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ringer_equivalence_number
          > > > >
          > > > > From that, you can figure out the current required by your ringer.
          > > > >
          > > > > You could hook it up with a relay, DPDT type.
          > > > > Common1 and Common2 to ringer.
          > > > > NC1 and NC2 to phone line
          > > > > NO1 and NO2 to 90V 20Hz source (or whatever you use)
          > > > > Coil energized by by door bell button
          > > > >
          > > > > Kerry
          > > > >
          > > > >
          > > > >
          > > > > jon wrote:
          > > > > >
          > > > > >
          > > > > > (I searched the group history for appropriate transformer info but
          > > > > > found nothing.)
          > > > > >
          > > > > > I got an extra loud phone ringer from the phone co. and want
          > to drive
          > > > > > it off my doorbell switch box.
          > > > ...
          > > > > > Thanks for any guidance to this guy who hasn't soldered in 20 yrs.
          > > > > >
          > > > > > Jon, in San Jose, CA
          > > > > >
          > > > > >
          >



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