Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Working wiht plexiglasss - little off the subject

Expand Messages
  • vaclav_sal
    I would like to use plexiglass as my project enclosure (so everybody can see my messy design!) My questions: What to use for gluing. Superglue leaves nasty
    Message 1 of 30 , Jan 26, 2011
      I would like to use plexiglass as my project enclosure (so everybody can see my messy design!)

      My questions:
      What to use for gluing. Superglue leaves nasty residue film on everyting and if not accessible it looks crappy.
      (So what if they use it to get fingerprints.)
      It needs to be strong, fast drying and absolutely invisible.

      How do you polish plexiglass? ( The cut edges need to be polished)
      I recall using toothpaste, but there must be something made specificly for plexi.
      Thanks for reading.
      Vaclav AA7EJ
    • Roland F. Harriston
      If I recall correctly, plexiglass is an old trade name that DuPont Corp. used for their version of a particular acrylic material. Every plastics manufacturer
      Message 2 of 30 , Jan 26, 2011
        If I recall correctly, "plexiglass" is an old trade name that DuPont
        Corp. used for their version
        of a particular acrylic material. Every plastics manufacturer had a
        trade name for their various products.

        So, first you must know exactly the generic or technical name for the
        material you are working with.
        Then, you can find the correct adhesive for that particular material,
        and how to cut, mold and/or
        machine that material.

        You can Google the trade name of the material you want to work with, and
        then find the correct
        methodologies for working with that material

        All of these "plastics" ...whatever they are called commercially, are
        specific polyresin formulations,
        each requiring different working techniques.

        There is no "one adhesive fits all" situation. If you use the wrong
        technology with a particular
        material, you wind up with a ugly, unstable, cracked and warped mess.

        Roland F. Harriston, P.D.
        *******************



        vaclav_sal wrote:

        > I would like to use plexiglass as my project enclosure (so everybody
        > can see my messy design!)
        >
        > My questions:
        > What to use for gluing. Superglue leaves nasty residue film on
        > everyting and if not accessible it looks crappy.
        > (So what if they use it to get fingerprints.)
        > It needs to be strong, fast drying and absolutely invisible.
        >
        > How do you polish plexiglass? ( The cut edges need to be polished)
        > I recall using toothpaste, but there must be something made specificly
        > for plexi.
        > Thanks for reading.
        > Vaclav AA7EJ
        >
        >
      • Frank Mead
        acetone is the best for gluing ... [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        Message 3 of 30 , Jan 26, 2011
          acetone is the best for gluing

          On Wed, Jan 26, 2011 at 10:03 AM, vaclav_sal <vaclav_sal@...> wrote:

          >
          >
          > I would like to use plexiglass as my project enclosure (so everybody can
          > see my messy design!)
          >
          > My questions:
          > What to use for gluing. Superglue leaves nasty residue film on everyting
          > and if not accessible it looks crappy.
          > (So what if they use it to get fingerprints.)
          > It needs to be strong, fast drying and absolutely invisible.
          >
          > How do you polish plexiglass? ( The cut edges need to be polished)
          > I recall using toothpaste, but there must be something made specificly for
          > plexi.
          > Thanks for reading.
          > Vaclav AA7EJ
          >
          >
          >


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • jong kung
          ... http://www.ehow.com/how_4883454_glue-plexiglass.html ==== Besides that, I saw on Modern Marvels they use a torch heat to make the sawed off ends clean and
          Message 4 of 30 , Jan 26, 2011
            > I would like to use plexiglass as my project
            > enclosure (so everybody can see my messy design!)

            >
            > My questions:

            > What to use for gluing.

            http://www.ehow.com/how_4883454_glue-plexiglass.html

            ====

            Besides that, I saw on Modern Marvels they use a torch heat to make the sawed off ends clean and ice like.   This was the kind of plexiglass used for bank tellers. 

            I would try it out on scrap plexiglass and do some experiments first.


            Jong















            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • James M. (Jim) Geidl
            Vaclav You may polish it with fine sandpaper then rubbing compound. Remember, if you are polishing the edges you want to keep them flat and square if they are
            Message 5 of 30 , Jan 26, 2011
              Vaclav

              You may polish it with fine sandpaper then rubbing compound. Remember, if
              you are polishing the edges you want to keep them flat and square if they
              are to be glued to another piece of plastic, therefore, sand and polish
              against a flat surface to avoid rounding them over. You can also use a
              jointer or power plane very effectively. Put the edges together that you
              wish to join with some blue masking tape and take acetone in a syringe and
              run it along the seam. It will wick into the joint and that's it.

              James "Jim" M. Geidl, K6JMG

              No trees were harmed in the sending of this message; however, a large number
              of electrons were terribly inconvenienced.



              > -----Original Message-----
              > From: Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com
              > [mailto:Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of vaclav_sal
              > Sent: Wednesday, January 26, 2011 8:03 AM
              > To: Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com
              > Subject: [Electronics_101] Working wiht plexiglasss - little
              > off the subject
              >
              > I would like to use plexiglass as my project enclosure (so
              > everybody can see my messy design!)
              >
              > My questions:
              > What to use for gluing. Superglue leaves nasty residue film
              > on everyting and if not accessible it looks crappy.
              > (So what if they use it to get fingerprints.) It needs to be
              > strong, fast drying and absolutely invisible.
              >
              > How do you polish plexiglass? ( The cut edges need to be
              > polished) I recall using toothpaste, but there must be
              > something made specificly for plexi.
              > Thanks for reading.
              > Vaclav AA7EJ
            • rtstofer
              ... Almost everything you need will be available at Tap Plastics: http://www.tapplastics.com/ MEK (methyl ethyl ketone) is often used to join acrylics as all
              Message 6 of 30 , Jan 26, 2011
                --- In Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com, "vaclav_sal" <vaclav_sal@...> wrote:
                >
                > I would like to use plexiglass as my project enclosure (so everybody can see my messy design!)
                >
                > My questions:
                > What to use for gluing. Superglue leaves nasty residue film on everyting and if not accessible it looks crappy.
                > (So what if they use it to get fingerprints.)
                > It needs to be strong, fast drying and absolutely invisible.
                >
                > How do you polish plexiglass? ( The cut edges need to be polished)
                > I recall using toothpaste, but there must be something made specificly for plexi.
                > Thanks for reading.
                > Vaclav AA7EJ
                >

                Almost everything you need will be available at Tap Plastics:
                http://www.tapplastics.com/

                MEK (methyl ethyl ketone) is often used to join acrylics as all you really do is melt the surfaces together. There is a special 'dropper bottle' that has a metal needle to dispense directly into joints. It doesn't take much and the surface tension of MEK is probably zero. It flows everywhere. Cant the assembly such that the MEK is flowing down into the joint.

                You can sand the edges to get them fairly smooth and then hit them lightly with a torch. Practice on some scrap first.

                There are some plastic polishes available on the web site.

                I frequently use acrylic sheets to build electronic projects because it is easier to obtain than aluminum sheets and is very easy to cut and assemble.

                Richard
              • James M. (Jim) Geidl
                BUT, you have to be really really careful not to round the edges...and it happens real quick. Richard suggested practicing on some scrap and that is a great
                Message 7 of 30 , Jan 26, 2011
                  BUT, you have to be really really careful not to round the edges...and it
                  happens real quick. Richard suggested practicing on some scrap and that is
                  a great idea.



                  James "Jim" M. Geidl, K6JMG

                  No trees were harmed in the sending of this message; however, a large number
                  of electrons were terribly inconvenienced.





                  > -----Original Message-----
                  > From: Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com
                  > [mailto:Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of jong kung
                  > Sent: Wednesday, January 26, 2011 8:22 AM
                  > To: Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com
                  > Subject: Re: [Electronics_101] Working wiht plexiglasss -
                  > little off the subject
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > > I would like to use plexiglass as my project enclosure (so
                  > everybody
                  > > can see my messy design!)
                  >
                  > >
                  > > My questions:
                  >
                  > > What to use for gluing.
                  >
                  > http://www.ehow.com/how_4883454_glue-plexiglass.html
                  >
                  > ====
                  >
                  > Besides that, I saw on Modern Marvels they use a torch heat
                  > to make the sawed off ends clean and ice like.   This was the
                  > kind of plexiglass used for bank tellers. 
                  >
                  > I would try it out on scrap plexiglass and do some experiments first.
                  >
                  >
                  > Jong
                • Kirk McLoren
                  solvent glueing is the old tried and true method   And of what kind are the men that will strive for this profitable preeminence, through all the bustle of
                  Message 8 of 30 , Jan 26, 2011
                    solvent glueing is the old tried and true method
                     
                    "And of what kind are the men that will strive for this profitable preeminence,
                    through all the bustle of cabal, the heat of contention, the infinite mutual
                    abuse of parties, tearing to pieces the best of characters? It will not be the
                    wise and moderate, the lovers of peace and good order, the men fittest for the
                    trust. It will be the bold and the violent, the men of strong passions and
                    indefatigable activity in their selfish pursuits. These will thrust themselves
                    into your government and be your rulers."- Excerpt from "Dangers of a Salaried
                    Bureaucracy" addressed to the Constitutional Convention members by Benjamin
                    Franklin in 1787





                    ________________________________
                    From: vaclav_sal <vaclav_sal@...>
                    To: Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com
                    Sent: Wed, January 26, 2011 10:03:28 AM
                    Subject: [Electronics_101] Working wiht plexiglasss - little off the subject

                     
                    I would like to use plexiglass as my project enclosure (so everybody can see my
                    messy design!)

                    My questions:
                    What to use for gluing. Superglue leaves nasty residue film on everyting and if
                    not accessible it looks crappy.

                    (So what if they use it to get fingerprints.)
                    It needs to be strong, fast drying and absolutely invisible.

                    How do you polish plexiglass? ( The cut edges need to be polished)
                    I recall using toothpaste, but there must be something made specificly for
                    plexi.
                    Thanks for reading.
                    Vaclav AA7EJ




                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  • jong kung
                    ... On the TV show, it did round the edge (ever so slightly).  But they wanted that effect. But why would rounded edge be bad?  Would that create a place for
                    Message 9 of 30 , Jan 26, 2011
                      > BUT, you have to be really really careful not to round the edges...

                      On the TV show, it did round the edge (ever so slightly).  But they wanted that effect.

                      But why would rounded edge be bad?  Would that create a place for the "crack" to start?  Or you are saying that complete square edge would look better attached to another 90 degree edge.

                      Just curious. I have no opinion either way.


                      Jong















                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    • Kirk McLoren
                      I think teller glazing is polycarbonate (Lexan) for impact resistance   ________________________________ From: jong kung To:
                      Message 10 of 30 , Jan 26, 2011
                        I think teller glazing is polycarbonate (Lexan) for impact resistance
                         




                        ________________________________
                        From: jong kung <jongkung01@...>
                        To: Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com
                        Sent: Wed, January 26, 2011 10:21:37 AM
                        Subject: Re: [Electronics_101] Working wiht plexiglasss - little off the subject

                         


                        > I would like to use plexiglass as my project
                        > enclosure (so everybody can see my messy design!)

                        >
                        > My questions:

                        > What to use for gluing.

                        http://www.ehow.com/how_4883454_glue-plexiglass.html

                        ====

                        Besides that, I saw on Modern Marvels they use a torch heat to make the sawed
                        off ends clean and ice like.   This was the kind of plexiglass used for bank
                        tellers. 


                        I would try it out on scrap plexiglass and do some experiments first.

                        Jong

                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      • KF5FEO
                        They have a special glue for plexiglass and you polish it the same way as metal. For a trick painted look, paint it on the inside and let the color show thru
                        Message 11 of 30 , Jan 26, 2011
                          They have a special glue for plexiglass and you polish it the same way as
                          metal. For a trick painted look, paint it on the inside and let the color
                          show thru or you can paint it on the outside just as you would metal. You
                          can tap and screw it together if your pieces are thick enough and cut it
                          just like wood. Hope this might help



                          73 Tom kf5feo



                          From: rtstofer [mailto:rstofer@...]
                          Sent: Wednesday, January 26, 2011 10:31 AM
                          To: Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com
                          Subject: [Electronics_101] Re: Working wiht plexiglasss - little off the
                          subject







                          --- In Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com
                          <mailto:Electronics_101%40yahoogroups.com> , "vaclav_sal" <vaclav_sal@...>
                          wrote:
                          >
                          > I would like to use plexiglass as my project enclosure (so everybody can
                          see my messy design!)
                          >
                          > My questions:
                          > What to use for gluing. Superglue leaves nasty residue film on everyting
                          and if not accessible it looks crappy.
                          > (So what if they use it to get fingerprints.)
                          > It needs to be strong, fast drying and absolutely invisible.
                          >
                          > How do you polish plexiglass? ( The cut edges need to be polished)
                          > I recall using toothpaste, but there must be something made specificly for
                          plexi.
                          > Thanks for reading.
                          > Vaclav AA7EJ
                          >

                          Almost everything you need will be available at Tap Plastics:
                          http://www.tapplastics.com/

                          MEK (methyl ethyl ketone) is often used to join acrylics as all you really
                          do is melt the surfaces together. There is a special 'dropper bottle' that
                          has a metal needle to dispense directly into joints. It doesn't take much
                          and the surface tension of MEK is probably zero. It flows everywhere. Cant
                          the assembly such that the MEK is flowing down into the joint.

                          You can sand the edges to get them fairly smooth and then hit them lightly
                          with a torch. Practice on some scrap first.

                          There are some plastic polishes available on the web site.

                          I frequently use acrylic sheets to build electronic projects because it is
                          easier to obtain than aluminum sheets and is very easy to cut and assemble.

                          Richard





                          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        • Corey Minion
                          MEK is the common plexi solvent welding material, also another material called resin-bond, or craftics cement 44 The joint is only going to be as good as your
                          Message 12 of 30 , Jan 26, 2011
                            MEK is the common plexi solvent welding material, also another material
                            called resin-bond, or craftics cement 44
                            The joint is only going to be as good as your prep work.
                            The cleanest joints are completely true, fine finished to a 200 grit and
                            then capillary filled on a floating bed using very fine wire to suspend
                            the sheet.
                            Most vendors simply flame polish with a torch, better vendors use a
                            combination of sanding papers up to 2000 grit and plastic polish, and or
                            a slow buff and a white polishing compound.
                            These are labor intensive methods.

                            On 1/26/2011 11:03 AM, vaclav_sal wrote:
                            >
                            > I would like to use plexiglass as my project enclosure (so everybody
                            > can see my messy design!)
                            >
                            > My questions:
                            > What to use for gluing. Superglue leaves nasty residue film on
                            > everyting and if not accessible it looks crappy.
                            > (So what if they use it to get fingerprints.)
                            > It needs to be strong, fast drying and absolutely invisible.
                            >
                            > How do you polish plexiglass? ( The cut edges need to be polished)
                            > I recall using toothpaste, but there must be something made specificly
                            > for plexi.
                            > Thanks for reading.
                            > Vaclav AA7EJ
                            >
                            >


                            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                          • Corey Minion
                            typically rounded edges are done with a round over router bit, then the faces are polished. It is all a matter of taste, and structural requirements. High end
                            Message 13 of 30 , Jan 26, 2011
                              typically rounded edges are done with a round over router bit, then the
                              faces are polished.
                              It is all a matter of taste, and structural requirements.
                              High end shops will anneal the material after each machining, solvent
                              welding and polishing step to relieve all stress and prevent crazing in
                              the future.

                              (sorry I used to own a aquarium and filtration manufacturing company in
                              the 90s, this was my daily work)

                              On 1/26/2011 11:57 AM, jong kung wrote:
                              >
                              >
                              > > BUT, you have to be really really careful not to round the edges...
                              >
                              > On the TV show, it did round the edge (ever so slightly). But they
                              > wanted that effect.
                              >
                              > But why would rounded edge be bad? Would that create a place for the
                              > "crack" to start? Or you are saying that complete square edge would
                              > look better attached to another 90 degree edge.
                              >
                              > Just curious. I have no opinion either way.
                              >
                              > Jong
                              >
                              > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                              >
                              >


                              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                            • KF5FEO
                              Square tight fits make for a strong joint. I glue a facing dish to my table saw blade before cutting to get square cuts, then just hit the edge lightly with
                              Message 14 of 30 , Jan 26, 2011
                                Square tight fits make for a strong joint. I glue a facing dish to my table
                                saw blade before cutting to get square cuts, then just hit the edge lightly
                                with sandpaper before gluing. Glad you brought plexiglass up as I need to
                                build a go box for my radio gear, one where the radio stays mounted and you
                                just grab it and go, take it out set it up connect power antenna and you are
                                transmitting. Either that or make out of wood.



                                73 Tom kf5feo



                                From: jong kung [mailto:jongkung01@...]
                                Sent: Wednesday, January 26, 2011 10:58 AM
                                To: Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com
                                Subject: RE: [Electronics_101] Working wiht plexiglasss - little off the
                                subject






                                > BUT, you have to be really really careful not to round the edges...

                                On the TV show, it did round the edge (ever so slightly). But they wanted
                                that effect.

                                But why would rounded edge be bad? Would that create a place for the
                                "crack" to start? Or you are saying that complete square edge would look
                                better attached to another 90 degree edge.

                                Just curious. I have no opinion either way.

                                Jong

                                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





                                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                              • Leon Heller
                                ... Methylene chloride dissolves it, and can be used to solvent-weld it. ... Toothpaste works well, but you can buy a special polish. Leon -- Leon Heller
                                Message 15 of 30 , Jan 26, 2011
                                  On 26/01/2011 16:03, vaclav_sal wrote:
                                  > I would like to use plexiglass as my project enclosure (so everybody can see my messy design!)
                                  >
                                  > My questions:
                                  > What to use for gluing. Superglue leaves nasty residue film on everyting and if not accessible it looks crappy.
                                  > (So what if they use it to get fingerprints.)
                                  > It needs to be strong, fast drying and absolutely invisible.

                                  Methylene chloride dissolves it, and can be used to "solvent-weld" it.


                                  > How do you polish plexiglass? ( The cut edges need to be polished)
                                  > I recall using toothpaste, but there must be something made specificly for plexi.


                                  Toothpaste works well, but you can buy a special polish.

                                  Leon
                                  --
                                  Leon Heller
                                  G1HSM
                                • vaclav_sal
                                  Wow, thanks everybody. What a well informed and experienced group. Now I need to find a source of thinker that 1/4 inch. In TX (Houston) that should not be a
                                  Message 16 of 30 , Jan 26, 2011
                                    Wow, thanks everybody.
                                    What a well informed and experienced group.
                                    Now I need to find a source of thinker that 1/4 inch.
                                    In TX (Houston) that should not be a problem, hardware stores are everywhere!(Right next to Starbucks)
                                    Vaclav AA7EJ
                                  • AlienRelics
                                    ... For glued edges, you don t need it to be polished. And in my experience, and from my plastics people at PSI in Tacoma, never glue flame-polished edges.
                                    Message 17 of 30 , Jan 26, 2011
                                      --- In Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com, jong kung <jongkung01@...> wrote:
                                      >
                                      >
                                      >
                                      > > I would like to use plexiglass as my project
                                      > > enclosure (so everybody can see my messy design!)
                                      >
                                      > >
                                      > > My questions:
                                      >
                                      > > What to use for gluing.
                                      >
                                      > http://www.ehow.com/how_4883454_glue-plexiglass.html
                                      >
                                      > ====
                                      >
                                      > Besides that, I saw on Modern Marvels they use a torch heat to make the sawed off ends clean and ice like.   This was the kind of plexiglass used for bank tellers. 
                                      >
                                      > I would try it out on scrap plexiglass and do some experiments first.
                                      >

                                      For glued edges, you don't need it to be polished. And in my experience, and from my plastics people at PSI in Tacoma, never glue flame-polished edges.

                                      Steve Greenfield AE7HD
                                    • Barry Savage
                                      ... Maybe this will help. My brother and I used to make telescope mirrors from metal, glass and plastic. And we used many different kinds of polishing
                                      Message 18 of 30 , Jan 26, 2011
                                        On 1/26/2011 8:03 AM, vaclav_sal wrote:
                                        >
                                        > I would like to use plexiglass as my project enclosure (so everybody
                                        > can see my messy design!)
                                        >
                                        > My questions:
                                        > What to use for gluing. Superglue leaves nasty residue film on
                                        > everyting and if not accessible it looks crappy.
                                        > (So what if they use it to get fingerprints.)
                                        > It needs to be strong, fast drying and absolutely invisible.
                                        >
                                        > How do you polish plexiglass? ( The cut edges need to be polished)
                                        > I recall using toothpaste, but there must be something made specificly
                                        > for plexi.
                                        > Thanks for reading.
                                        > Vaclav AA7EJ
                                        >
                                        Maybe this will help. My brother and I used to make telescope mirrors
                                        from metal, glass and plastic. And we used many different kinds of
                                        polishing compounds, from very rough to extremely fine, like rouge.
                                        Then we would keep "candling" the mirror until it was perfect. Made
                                        some great Newtonian 8-inch scopes that way. Never had to nerve to make
                                        a Argunov--Cassegrain telescope. Just the thought of grinding a hole
                                        through the center of a newly made mirror creeped us out.

                                        http://www.hobbytool.com/buffing.htm

                                        Barry



                                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                      • Ben L
                                        ... Don t know about Invisible Glue but You can use Fine Wet Sand Paper to polish your edges. Ben
                                        Message 19 of 30 , Jan 26, 2011
                                          > My questions:
                                          > What to use for gluing. Superglue leaves nasty residue film on everyting and if not accessible it looks crappy.
                                          > (So what if they use it to get fingerprints.)
                                          > It needs to be strong, fast drying and absolutely invisible.
                                          >
                                          > How do you polish plexiglass? ( The cut edges need to be polished)
                                          > I recall using toothpaste, but there must be something made specificly for plexi.

                                          Don't know about Invisible Glue but You can use Fine Wet Sand Paper to polish your edges.


                                          Ben
                                        • Tony Mikolaj
                                          ... A good start is to draw a knife blade along the cut edge, hold the blade vertical to the edge, two or three passes will give a good result but you have to
                                          Message 20 of 30 , Jan 27, 2011
                                            --- In Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com, "Ben L" <bhleavi@...> wrote:
                                            >
                                            >Don't know about Invisible Glue but You can use Fine Wet Sand Paper to polish your edges.
                                            >
                                            A good start is to draw a knife blade along the cut edge, hold the blade vertical to the edge, two or three passes will give a good result but you have to be careful not to slip off and leave a scratch on the face.

                                            Tony
                                          • Terrance
                                            Plexiglas is PMMA...Poly(methyl methacrylate) It s exactly the same as Lucite. -Terrance
                                            Message 21 of 30 , Jan 27, 2011
                                              "Plexiglas" is PMMA...Poly(methyl methacrylate)

                                              It's exactly the same as Lucite.

                                              -Terrance

                                              --- In Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com, "Roland F. Harriston" <rolohar@...> wrote:
                                              >
                                              > If I recall correctly, "plexiglass" is an old trade name that DuPont
                                              > Corp. used for their version
                                              > of a particular acrylic material. Every plastics manufacturer had a
                                              > trade name for their various products.
                                              >
                                              > So, first you must know exactly the generic or technical name for the
                                              > material you are working with.
                                              > Then, you can find the correct adhesive for that particular material,
                                              > and how to cut, mold and/or
                                              > machine that material.
                                              >
                                              > You can Google the trade name of the material you want to work with, and
                                              > then find the correct
                                              > methodologies for working with that material
                                              >
                                              > All of these "plastics" ...whatever they are called commercially, are
                                              > specific polyresin formulations,
                                              > each requiring different working techniques.
                                              >
                                              > There is no "one adhesive fits all" situation. If you use the wrong
                                              > technology with a particular
                                              > material, you wind up with a ugly, unstable, cracked and warped mess.
                                              >
                                              > Roland F. Harriston, P.D.
                                              > *******************
                                              >
                                              >
                                              >
                                              > vaclav_sal wrote:
                                              >
                                              > > I would like to use plexiglass as my project enclosure (so everybody
                                              > > can see my messy design!)
                                              > >
                                              > > My questions:
                                              > > What to use for gluing. Superglue leaves nasty residue film on
                                              > > everyting and if not accessible it looks crappy.
                                              > > (So what if they use it to get fingerprints.)
                                              > > It needs to be strong, fast drying and absolutely invisible.
                                              > >
                                              > > How do you polish plexiglass? ( The cut edges need to be polished)
                                              > > I recall using toothpaste, but there must be something made specificly
                                              > > for plexi.
                                              > > Thanks for reading.
                                              > > Vaclav AA7EJ
                                              > >
                                              > >
                                              >
                                            • Roland F. Harriston
                                              Terrance: Your are absolutely correct. Nearly the same formulation. You work with Lucite and Plexiglas in the same manner. The point that I was trying to make
                                              Message 22 of 30 , Jan 27, 2011
                                                Terrance:

                                                Your are absolutely correct. Nearly the same formulation.
                                                You work with Lucite and Plexiglas in the same manner.

                                                The point that I was trying to make is that in order to do
                                                professional, workman-like jobs with these materials,
                                                it is best to learn how to work with them and what
                                                adhesives and polishing/finishing techniques to use.

                                                For example: Simple "score and snap" cutting of some materials
                                                is different than others. The difference in techniques are
                                                simple, but if you take the wrong approach, you will shatter
                                                the material.

                                                Using the wrong adhesive can often result in cracking, crazing,
                                                and staining the material. If you are going to do any bending
                                                of the material, you should know what temperature ranges
                                                the material can withstand, and how small a radius you are allowed.

                                                Perhaps I'm a bit different that most. I like to do things right.
                                                And I like to know what is "right" before I start a job.

                                                Some of the comments posted on Electronics 101 are really cogent.
                                                Others are just plain kaka.

                                                "You pays yo money, and you takes yo choice"

                                                Roland F. Harriston, P.D.
                                                ********************




                                                Terrance wrote:
                                                >
                                                >
                                                > "Plexiglas" is PMMA...Poly(methyl methacrylate)
                                                >
                                                > It's exactly the same as Lucite.
                                                >
                                                > -Terrance
                                                >
                                                > --- In Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com
                                                > <mailto:Electronics_101%40yahoogroups.com>, "Roland F. Harriston"
                                                > <rolohar@...> wrote:
                                                > >
                                                > > If I recall correctly, "plexiglass" is an old trade name that DuPont
                                                > > Corp. used for their version
                                                > > of a particular acrylic material. Every plastics manufacturer had a
                                                > > trade name for their various products.
                                                > >
                                                > > So, first you must know exactly the generic or technical name for the
                                                > > material you are working with.
                                                > > Then, you can find the correct adhesive for that particular material,
                                                > > and how to cut, mold and/or
                                                > > machine that material.
                                                > >
                                                > > You can Google the trade name of the material you want to work with,
                                                > and
                                                > > then find the correct
                                                > > methodologies for working with that material
                                                > >
                                                > > All of these "plastics" ...whatever they are called commercially, are
                                                > > specific polyresin formulations,
                                                > > each requiring different working techniques.
                                                > >
                                                > > There is no "one adhesive fits all" situation. If you use the wrong
                                                > > technology with a particular
                                                > > material, you wind up with a ugly, unstable, cracked and warped mess.
                                                > >
                                                > > Roland F. Harriston, P.D.
                                                > > *******************
                                                > >
                                                > >
                                                > >
                                                > > vaclav_sal wrote:
                                                > >
                                                > > > I would like to use plexiglass as my project enclosure (so everybody
                                                > > > can see my messy design!)
                                                > > >
                                                > > > My questions:
                                                > > > What to use for gluing. Superglue leaves nasty residue film on
                                                > > > everyting and if not accessible it looks crappy.
                                                > > > (So what if they use it to get fingerprints.)
                                                > > > It needs to be strong, fast drying and absolutely invisible.
                                                > > >
                                                > > > How do you polish plexiglass? ( The cut edges need to be polished)
                                                > > > I recall using toothpaste, but there must be something made
                                                > specificly
                                                > > > for plexi.
                                                > > > Thanks for reading.
                                                > > > Vaclav AA7EJ
                                                > > >
                                                > > >
                                                > >
                                                >
                                                >



                                                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                              • Leon Heller
                                                ... And Perspex, here in the UK. It used to be made by ICI but I don t know if they are still around. Leon -- Leon Heller G1HSM
                                                Message 23 of 30 , Jan 27, 2011
                                                  On 27/01/2011 17:41, Terrance wrote:
                                                  > "Plexiglas" is PMMA...Poly(methyl methacrylate)
                                                  >
                                                  > It's exactly the same as Lucite.


                                                  And Perspex, here in the UK. It used to be made by ICI but I don't know
                                                  if they are still around.

                                                  Leon
                                                  --
                                                  Leon Heller
                                                  G1HSM
                                                • Roland F. Harriston
                                                  Leon Heller: I dont think we can get Perspex in the States. At least, I have never run across it here. Roland F. Harriston P.D. ******************
                                                  Message 24 of 30 , Jan 27, 2011
                                                    Leon Heller:

                                                    I dont' think we can get Perspex in the States.
                                                    At least, I have never run across it here.

                                                    Roland F. Harriston P.D.
                                                    ******************


                                                    Leon Heller wrote:

                                                    >
                                                    >
                                                    > On 27/01/2011 17:41, Terrance wrote:
                                                    > > "Plexiglas" is PMMA...Poly(methyl methacrylate)
                                                    > >
                                                    > > It's exactly the same as Lucite.
                                                    >
                                                    > And Perspex, here in the UK. It used to be made by ICI but I don't know
                                                    > if they are still around.
                                                    >
                                                    > Leon
                                                    > --
                                                    > Leon Heller
                                                    > G1HSM
                                                    >
                                                    >
                                                  • Leon Heller
                                                    ... It s never been sold there - something to do with patents, perhaps. Leon -- Leon Heller G1HSM
                                                    Message 25 of 30 , Jan 27, 2011
                                                      On 27/01/2011 22:04, Roland F. Harriston wrote:
                                                      > Leon Heller:
                                                      >
                                                      > I dont' think we can get Perspex in the States.
                                                      > At least, I have never run across it here

                                                      It's never been sold there - something to do with patents, perhaps.

                                                      Leon
                                                      --
                                                      Leon Heller
                                                      G1HSM
                                                    • Randy
                                                      I wonder, though, if it s just a matter of words having become generic, specific to the UK or US? Polyethylene (US) is the same as polythene (UK), and then
                                                      Message 26 of 30 , Jan 27, 2011
                                                        I wonder, though, if it's just a matter of words having become generic,
                                                        specific to the UK or US?
                                                        Polyethylene (US) is the same as polythene (UK), and then there's
                                                        aluminum vs. aluminium.
                                                        Obviously, from a business perspective, the trademark names would
                                                        matter... but, surprisingly
                                                        enough, Lucite's international website sings the praises of Perspex:
                                                        http://www.lucite.com/perspex.asp

                                                        Randy V.
                                                        On 1/27/2011 5:34 PM, Leon Heller wrote:
                                                        >
                                                        > On 27/01/2011 22:04, Roland F. Harriston wrote:
                                                        > > Leon Heller:
                                                        > >
                                                        > > I dont' think we can get Perspex in the States.
                                                        > > At least, I have never run across it here
                                                        >
                                                        > It's never been sold there - something to do with patents, perhaps.
                                                        >
                                                        > Leon
                                                        > --
                                                        > Leon Heller
                                                        > G1HSM
                                                        >
                                                        >
                                                        > ------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                        >
                                                        > No virus found in this message.
                                                        > Checked by AVG - www.avg.com <http://www.avg.com>
                                                        > Version: 10.0.1191 / Virus Database: 1435/3404 - Release Date: 01/26/11
                                                        >



                                                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                                      • Roland F. Harriston
                                                        Thanks Randy! Roland F. Harriston P.d *****************
                                                        Message 27 of 30 , Jan 27, 2011
                                                          Thanks Randy!

                                                          Roland F. Harriston P.d
                                                          *****************

                                                          Randy wrote:

                                                          > I wonder, though, if it's just a matter of words having become generic,
                                                          > specific to the UK or US?
                                                          > Polyethylene (US) is the same as polythene (UK), and then there's
                                                          > aluminum vs. aluminium.
                                                          > Obviously, from a business perspective, the trademark names would
                                                          > matter... but, surprisingly
                                                          > enough, Lucite's international website sings the praises of Perspex:
                                                          > http://www.lucite.com/perspex.asp
                                                          >
                                                          > Randy V.
                                                          > On 1/27/2011 5:34 PM, Leon Heller wrote:
                                                          > >
                                                          > > On 27/01/2011 22:04, Roland F. Harriston wrote:
                                                          > > > Leon Heller:
                                                          > > >
                                                          > > > I dont' think we can get Perspex in the States.
                                                          > > > At least, I have never run across it here
                                                          > >
                                                          > > It's never been sold there - something to do with patents, perhaps.
                                                          > >
                                                          > > Leon
                                                          > > --
                                                          > > Leon Heller
                                                          > > G1HSM
                                                          > >
                                                          > >
                                                          > > ----------------------------------------------------------
                                                          > >
                                                          > > No virus found in this message.
                                                          > > Checked by AVG - www.avg.com <http://www.avg.com>
                                                          > > Version: 10.0.1191 / Virus Database: 1435/3404 - Release Date: 01/26/11
                                                          > >
                                                          >
                                                          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                                          >
                                                          >
                                                        • Don@groupKOS.com
                                                          When polishing Plexiglas with a power tool, be real careful not to overheat the surface which will craze; it melts and get all knarly on the surface. When
                                                          Message 28 of 30 , Feb 1, 2011
                                                            When polishing Plexiglas with a power tool, be real careful not to
                                                            overheat the surface which will craze; it melts and get all knarly on
                                                            the surface.

                                                            When drilling, the break-through can catch enough plastic to crack or
                                                            break a thin Plexiglas sheet. Use high-speed and a feather-feed. A
                                                            plunge-router would be the bee's knees for drilling holes in thin stock.

                                                            Working in a cold room increases the chance of cracking.

                                                            A sharp flat bastard file will work great for dressing the edges ready
                                                            for the final polish.

                                                            I've seen guys use super-glue (cyanoacrylic) to glue together Plexiglas
                                                            boxes. If you want to open up a super-glued-box, just put a knife on
                                                            the edge and tap it to pop open the glue joint.

                                                            Though expensive, the teller-window plastic (Tufac(R), a polycarbonate),
                                                            can be readily polished to a really nice high shine.

                                                            AZDon


                                                            On 1/26/2011 10:50 AM, KF5FEO wrote:
                                                            > They have a special glue for plexiglass and you polish it the same way as
                                                            > metal. For a trick painted look, paint it on the inside and let the color
                                                            > show thru or you can paint it on the outside just as you would metal. You
                                                            > can tap and screw it together if your pieces are thick enough and cut it
                                                            > just like wood. Hope this might help
                                                            >
                                                            >
                                                            >
                                                            > 73 Tom kf5feo
                                                            >
                                                            >
                                                            >
                                                            > From: rtstofer [mailto:rstofer@...]
                                                            > Sent: Wednesday, January 26, 2011 10:31 AM
                                                            > To: Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com
                                                            > Subject: [Electronics_101] Re: Working wiht plexiglasss - little off the
                                                            > subject
                                                            >
                                                            >
                                                            >
                                                            >
                                                            >
                                                            >
                                                            >
                                                            > --- In Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com
                                                            > <mailto:Electronics_101%40yahoogroups.com> , "vaclav_sal"<vaclav_sal@...>
                                                            > wrote:
                                                            >> I would like to use plexiglass as my project enclosure (so everybody can
                                                            > see my messy design!)
                                                            >> My questions:
                                                            >> What to use for gluing. Superglue leaves nasty residue film on everyting
                                                            > and if not accessible it looks crappy.
                                                            >> (So what if they use it to get fingerprints.)
                                                            >> It needs to be strong, fast drying and absolutely invisible.
                                                            >>
                                                            >> How do you polish plexiglass? ( The cut edges need to be polished)
                                                            >> I recall using toothpaste, but there must be something made specificly for
                                                            > plexi.
                                                            >> Thanks for reading.
                                                            >> Vaclav AA7EJ
                                                            >>
                                                            > Almost everything you need will be available at Tap Plastics:
                                                            > http://www.tapplastics.com/
                                                            >
                                                            > MEK (methyl ethyl ketone) is often used to join acrylics as all you really
                                                            > do is melt the surfaces together. There is a special 'dropper bottle' that
                                                            > has a metal needle to dispense directly into joints. It doesn't take much
                                                            > and the surface tension of MEK is probably zero. It flows everywhere. Cant
                                                            > the assembly such that the MEK is flowing down into the joint.
                                                            >
                                                            > You can sand the edges to get them fairly smooth and then hit them lightly
                                                            > with a torch. Practice on some scrap first.
                                                            >
                                                            > There are some plastic polishes available on the web site.
                                                            >
                                                            > I frequently use acrylic sheets to build electronic projects because it is
                                                            > easier to obtain than aluminum sheets and is very easy to cut and assemble.
                                                            >
                                                            > Richard
                                                            >
                                                            >
                                                            >
                                                          • KF5FEO
                                                            A ¼” thick piece is easy to work with router on a router table, just don’t pause or it melts. The thin stuff is crack city. 73 Tom kf5feo From:
                                                            Message 29 of 30 , Feb 1, 2011
                                                              A ¼” thick piece is easy to work with router on a router table, just don’t
                                                              pause or it melts. The thin stuff is crack city.



                                                              73 Tom kf5feo



                                                              From: Don@... [mailto:don@...]
                                                              Sent: Tuesday, February 01, 2011 12:04 PM
                                                              To: Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com
                                                              Subject: Re: [Electronics_101] Re: Working wiht plexiglasss - little off the
                                                              subject





                                                              When polishing Plexiglas with a power tool, be real careful not to
                                                              overheat the surface which will craze; it melts and get all knarly on
                                                              the surface.

                                                              When drilling, the break-through can catch enough plastic to crack or
                                                              break a thin Plexiglas sheet. Use high-speed and a feather-feed. A
                                                              plunge-router would be the bee's knees for drilling holes in thin stock.

                                                              Working in a cold room increases the chance of cracking.

                                                              A sharp flat bastard file will work great for dressing the edges ready
                                                              for the final polish.

                                                              I've seen guys use super-glue (cyanoacrylic) to glue together Plexiglas
                                                              boxes. If you want to open up a super-glued-box, just put a knife on
                                                              the edge and tap it to pop open the glue joint.

                                                              Though expensive, the teller-window plastic (Tufac(R), a polycarbonate),
                                                              can be readily polished to a really nice high shine.

                                                              AZDon

                                                              On 1/26/2011 10:50 AM, KF5FEO wrote:
                                                              > They have a special glue for plexiglass and you polish it the same way as
                                                              > metal. For a trick painted look, paint it on the inside and let the color
                                                              > show thru or you can paint it on the outside just as you would metal. You
                                                              > can tap and screw it together if your pieces are thick enough and cut it
                                                              > just like wood. Hope this might help
                                                              >
                                                              >
                                                              >
                                                              > 73 Tom kf5feo
                                                              >
                                                              >
                                                              >
                                                              > From: rtstofer [mailto:rstofer@... <mailto:rstofer%40pacbell.net>
                                                              ]
                                                              > Sent: Wednesday, January 26, 2011 10:31 AM
                                                              > To: Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com
                                                              <mailto:Electronics_101%40yahoogroups.com>
                                                              > Subject: [Electronics_101] Re: Working wiht plexiglasss - little off the
                                                              > subject
                                                              >
                                                              >
                                                              >
                                                              >
                                                              >
                                                              >
                                                              >
                                                              > --- In Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com
                                                              <mailto:Electronics_101%40yahoogroups.com>
                                                              > <mailto:Electronics_101%40yahoogroups.com> , "vaclav_sal"<vaclav_sal@...>
                                                              > wrote:
                                                              >> I would like to use plexiglass as my project enclosure (so everybody can
                                                              > see my messy design!)
                                                              >> My questions:
                                                              >> What to use for gluing. Superglue leaves nasty residue film on everyting
                                                              > and if not accessible it looks crappy.
                                                              >> (So what if they use it to get fingerprints.)
                                                              >> It needs to be strong, fast drying and absolutely invisible.
                                                              >>
                                                              >> How do you polish plexiglass? ( The cut edges need to be polished)
                                                              >> I recall using toothpaste, but there must be something made specificly
                                                              for
                                                              > plexi.
                                                              >> Thanks for reading.
                                                              >> Vaclav AA7EJ
                                                              >>
                                                              > Almost everything you need will be available at Tap Plastics:
                                                              > http://www.tapplastics.com/
                                                              >
                                                              > MEK (methyl ethyl ketone) is often used to join acrylics as all you really
                                                              > do is melt the surfaces together. There is a special 'dropper bottle' that
                                                              > has a metal needle to dispense directly into joints. It doesn't take much
                                                              > and the surface tension of MEK is probably zero. It flows everywhere. Cant
                                                              > the assembly such that the MEK is flowing down into the joint.
                                                              >
                                                              > You can sand the edges to get them fairly smooth and then hit them lightly
                                                              > with a torch. Practice on some scrap first.
                                                              >
                                                              > There are some plastic polishes available on the web site.
                                                              >
                                                              > I frequently use acrylic sheets to build electronic projects because it is
                                                              > easier to obtain than aluminum sheets and is very easy to cut and
                                                              assemble.
                                                              >
                                                              > Richard
                                                              >
                                                              >
                                                              >





                                                              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                                            • rtstofer
                                                              ... Sandwich the thing acrylic between pieces of plywood, MDF or hardboard (Masonite). You might need some way to clamp the pieces and even simple strongbacks
                                                              Message 30 of 30 , Feb 1, 2011
                                                                --- In Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com, "KF5FEO" <kf5feo@...> wrote:
                                                                >
                                                                > A ¼" thick piece is easy to work with router on a router table, just don't
                                                                > pause or it melts. The thin stuff is crack city.
                                                                >
                                                                >
                                                                >
                                                                > 73 Tom kf5feo
                                                                >


                                                                Sandwich the thing acrylic between pieces of plywood, MDF or hardboard (Masonite). You might need some way to clamp the pieces and even simple strongbacks over the top of the plywood will work. Just make the plywood overly long and screw through.

                                                                Much of my routing involves a template and this approach is quite similar.

                                                                Richard
                                                              Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.