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Re: error in Electonics for Hobbyists books?

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  • Bill
    No, because that is exactly what I would expect to happen under those circumstances.
    Message 1 of 67 , Sep 1, 2010
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      No, because that is exactly what I would expect to happen under those circumstances.

      --- In Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com, "aimercer" <amercer@...> wrote:
      >
      > Would you be mad at your teacher when ...
      >
      > 1. You are on a carnival ride and on the downward portion the bubbles in your stoppered refreshment container sink downward?
      >
      > 2. You are visiting the international space station and now the bubbles in your refreshment stay put (neither move up or down)?
      >
      > :)
      >
      > Art
      >
      > --- In Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com, "Bill" <vanvonu@> wrote:
      > >
      > > It was somewhere back in elementary school that I learned that light things rise and heavy things fall.
      > >
      > > --- In Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com, jong kung <jongkung01@> wrote:
      > > >
      > >
      > > >
      > > > Jong
      > > >
      > > > P.S.� By the way, do you still say that bubbles float up, or do you say water flows down leaving an space absent of water (aka bubble).� :-)
      > > >
      > >
      >
    • Kirk McLoren
      http://www.forgottenagesresearch.com/out-of-place-artifacts-series/The-Baghdad-Batteries-and-BeyondEvidence-of-Ancien.htm some woo woo but he says
      Message 67 of 67 , Sep 3, 2010
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        http://www.forgottenagesresearch.com/out-of-place-artifacts-series/The-Baghdad-Batteries-and-BeyondEvidence-of-Ancien.htm

        some woo woo but he says electroplated stuff has been found

        "You cannot reason a person out of a position he did not reason
        himself into in the first place." -Jonathan Swift
        So, if science is taught as just a collection of (assumed-to-be)
        facts, it is nothing but dogma. Dogma stoutly resists subsequent
        displacement by reason.




        ________________________________
        From: Glenn Clabough <iamdenteddisk@...>
        To: Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Fri, September 3, 2010 2:38:15 PM
        Subject: Re: [Electronics_101] Re: error in Electonics for Hobbyists books?


        I don't believe a true scientist can adhere to that statement, I call you to
        notice "magnetologic" not only is it possible the first trasistor was made
        accidentaly but that it could have even been used in ancient times.

        magnatologic is a subject based on rudementry elements stacked in layer's such
        as metals porcilin natural magnet, glass and others , layered to mimic the
        actions of digital gates and transistors. there was a "popsci issue coverstory"
        on it .

        anyhow as long as man has been laying goods up in store houses and tresurey's
        and grainery's there have been things stacked in proximity to one another.

        take also into acount ,we still have no idea/proof what the bagdad battery was
        used for, we have proof of ancient knollage of the solarsystem through the
        antikithera discovery.

        proof some ancient needed a battery
        proof some ancient had the intellegence to master clockwork aswell as
        distant astronomy in times before man as we know it had even questioned the
        shape of the earth..

        I think the statement should read the "transistor" as we know it was> first
        introduced to the public knollage< by the first scientist willing to share his
        work with a university who would later patent and make it's discovery known to
        the public. not that the device had never existed as I am sure there where many
        who experimented with property's of elements and anyone who could set 2
        capacitors in series or valves has found out about the likeness in behvior when
        compared to the transistor.

        Glenn E. Clabough
        iamdenteddisk@...

        --- On Fri, 9/3/10, Maj Wright <mccrpt@...> wrote:

        From: Maj Wright <mccrpt@...>
        Subject: [Electronics_101] Re: error in Electonics for Hobbyists books?
        To: Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com
        Date: Friday, September 3, 2010, 8:57 AM



        Engineering especially EE is a branch of Physics and other sciences. Mostly is
        applied.

        The transistor was one invention where the inventors had to understand what they
        were working on, both in Physics and Chemistry. Building a transistor is a
        chemical process, but directed by Physics. Applying the transistor required more
        knowledgeable needs such as RF, op-amp, etc. Of course the Physicist and Chemist
        came up with the solutions.

        It took engineers to come up with transistors assembled on ICs and also methods
        of tying many millions on a single waver. This is another science in itself.
        Also many engineers and techs with tools were needed to come up with the
        equipment to manufacture the ICs.

        It took lots of bean counters to determine it was best to make in one run 10 or
        more years worth of a transistor or ICs to make them cheap and cost effective.
        It cost a lot just to gear up to make an IC. Once going it cost pennies.

        That is the world of electronics. It takes many many different sciences and
        talents to make things work. After a while one becomes to think they are real
        small, hi, but all contribute.

        73, ron, n9ee/r

        --- In Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com, Phil Hystad <phystad@...> wrote:
        >
        > >
        > > If that were true, solid state devices would have been invented, much later,
        >by solid state physicists rather than EEs.
        > >
        > >
        >
        >
        >
        > I am new to this thread so I may be out of line here but I thought the comment
        >above demanded
        > attention. Solid state devices might be said to have started with the invention
        >of the transistor.
        > All three people who invented the transistor (and, won the Nobel Prize in
        >Physics) were indeed
        > physicists. That is: William Shockley, John Bardeen, and Walter Brattain. Now
        >John Bardeen also
        > had a degree in EE in addition to his PhD in Physics so you might say that he
        >was also an electrical
        > engineer. And, John Bardeen won another Nobel Prize in Physics for his work in
        >superconductivity.
        >
        > Also, a good friend of mine spent a career (from the late 1960s) until his
        >retirement as a process
        > engineer working at various semiconductor labs. His degrees are Physics, not
        >engineering and I remember
        > he used to encourage me to join the kind of work he did because of my degrees
        >in Physics. I remember
        > him saying that most of the process engineers at such places like Intel,
        >National Semiconductor, Texas
        > Instruments, etc. were indeed physicists and not engineers.
        >
        > Now, engineers worked on the circuitry of various things but making solid state
        >devices actually work
        > I think is more the realm of physics rather then engineering. Engineering also
        >comes into play in
        >
        > building wafer fab plants and the process of building things but actual
        >invention was due to
        >
        > physicists.
        >
        > phil
        >
        > On Sep 1, 2010, at 4:49 PM, Glenn Clabough wrote:
        >
        > > I agree a Trained EE only knows his training, after school I learned to make
        >my own componants wich requires understanding in many fields "physics" wich
        >opened many other doors too..
        > >
        > > Glenn E. Clabough
        > > iamdenteddisk@...
        > >
        > > --- On Wed, 9/1/10, Bill <vanvonu@...> wrote:
        > >
        > > From: Bill <vanvonu@...>
        > > Subject: [Electronics_101] Re: error in Electonics for Hobbyists books?
        > > To: Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com
        > > Date: Wednesday, September 1, 2010, 1:26 PM
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > If that were true, solid state devices would have been invented, much later,
        >by solid state physicists rather than EEs.
        > >
        > > --- In Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com, "aimercer" <amercer@> wrote:
        > > >
        > > >
        > > >
        > > > EE training needs not be concerned with the theoretical - it is more a
        >practical/applied pursuit - so conventions and conventional current work fine as
        >a standard.
        > > >
        > > > Art
        > > >
        > >
        > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        > >
        > >
        >
        >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >

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