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Re: [Electronics_101] Re: Simple, DC voltage-based circuit cut-off / turn-on

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  • Glenn Clabough
    right had it been more than two variables clearly a pick or stamp, I allway s point the newby s to a parallax whats a micro controller kit they was originaly
    Message 1 of 32 , Sep 1, 2010
      right had it been more than two variables clearly a pick or stamp, I allway's point the newby's to a parallax "whats a micro controller kit" they was originaly 79 now 49 build your own $29 gets them going and the bs2 chip type for advanced or micro builders..plenty of pdf books online to copy from you only need minimal programming skills cause unless you just need a sly algorythem its prety much documented..
       
      still you gotto select wich uC by knowing what amount of power and perifrial you need..

      Glenn E. Clabough
      iamdenteddisk@...

      --- On Mon, 8/30/10, jong kung <jongkung01@...> wrote:


      From: jong kung <jongkung01@...>
      Subject: Re: [Electronics_101] Re: Simple, DC voltage-based circuit cut-off / turn-on
      To: Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com
      Date: Monday, August 30, 2010, 5:45 PM


       



      Hi Glenn,

      > ... but for what he is asking, the timer is sufficiant ...

      You are most probably right about this.  I always think in terms of hobbyist and experimentation.  I think in terms of building a circuit and then tinkering with it (and again and again).  A hardware solution would be mostly fixed and done.  So I was thinking how "flexible" it would be to have a uC solution that he (The OP) can tinker till the cows come home.  I was thinking that uC would also help if he was working out the problem as he was debugging the built circuit (using uC).

      But the OP is probably just interested in getting something working (and already worked out) and tuck it away till the next time.

      Jong

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    • Andrewdavid.mathison
      When mentioning PICs or similar, don t forget the PICAXE range of chips with a built in BASIC interpreter, some even run at 40MHz!!! They will even probably be
      Message 32 of 32 , Sep 2, 2010
        When mentioning PICs or similar, don't forget the PICAXE range of chips with a built in BASIC interpreter, some even run at 40MHz!!!

        They will even probably be the cheapest chips for the performance given using BASIC, especially when you realise that ALL the software that you need is free! (there are some extra software packets, not needed for doing everything that 99% of the users will never need, that cost some money, but even those are not really expensive).

        There is even a free simulator that allows you to test your program, even before you buy a single chip or anything.......

        Certainly nobody should ever forget the PICAXE chips from Rev-Ed.....at:-

        http://www.rev-ed.co.uk/picaxe/

        Today, even though I have been an extensive user of 555 chips for very many years, I would think twice before using one instead of a PICAXE chip.....

        Greetings from

        Andy Mathison

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