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Practice exam

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  • blue_eagle74
    I did the Electronics Associate Practice Exam at http://www.eta-i.org/practice_exams.html I got an 88%. 79 out of 100 questions. How many can you get? Brian
    Message 1 of 29 , Jul 28, 2010
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      I did the Electronics Associate Practice Exam at http://www.eta-i.org/practice_exams.html

      I got an 88%. 79 out of 100 questions. How many can you get?

      Brian
    • Ross McKenzie
      ... 91% and 81 first go. The wording ... and spelling (eg main instead of maintain ), could be improved. Cheers, Ross
      Message 2 of 29 , Jul 28, 2010
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        blue_eagle74 wrote:
        > I did the Electronics Associate Practice Exam at http://www.eta-i.org/practice_exams.html
        >
        > I got an 88%. 79 out of 100 questions. How many can you get?
        >
        > Brian
        >
        91% and 81 first go. The wording ... and spelling (eg "main" instead of
        "maintain"), could be improved.

        Cheers,

        Ross
      • blue_eagle74
        Good job. I have learned from books and the web and thouhgt I did good. Brian
        Message 3 of 29 , Jul 28, 2010
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          Good job. I have learned from books and the web and thouhgt I did good.
          Brian
          > 91% and 81 first go. The wording ... and spelling (eg "main" instead of
          > "maintain"), could be improved.
          >
          > Cheers,
          >
          > Ross
          >
        • Ross McKenzie
          ... Of course you did well. No one can take that away from you. Although I am electronics engineer, there are some areas that I have never had to work in since
          Message 4 of 29 , Jul 28, 2010
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            blue_eagle74 wrote:
            > Good job. I have learned from books and the web and thouhgt I did good.
            > Brian
            >

            Of course you did well. No one can take that away from you. Although I
            am electronics engineer, there are some areas that I have never had to
            work in since graduating nearly 40 years ago ... motors and generators
            and the old left hand rule for example.

            Cheers,

            Ross
          • DaveC
            ... And those PC questions. I do not know about memory and such. Should not be on an electronics exam... Those are computer technician questions, as are
            Message 5 of 29 , Jul 28, 2010
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              >Of course you did well. No one can take that away from you. Although I
              >am electronics engineer, there are some areas that I have never had to
              >work in since graduating nearly 40 years ago ... motors and generators
              >and the old left hand rule for example.
              >
              >Cheers,
              >
              >Ross

              And those "PC" questions. I do not know about memory and such. Should
              not be on an electronics exam... Those are computer technician
              questions, as are monitor resolution, disk drive interface, etc.

              Dave
              (87%)
            • ae5ew
              I ll bet more than one electronics tech works on PDx. Charles AE5EW
              Message 6 of 29 , Jul 28, 2010
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                I'll bet more than one electronics tech works on PDx. Charles AE5EW

                --- In Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com, DaveC <davec2468@...> wrote:
                >
                > >Of course you did well. No one can take that away from you. Although I
                > >am electronics engineer, there are some areas that I have never had to
                > >work in since graduating nearly 40 years ago ... motors and generators
                > >and the old left hand rule for example.
                > >
                > >Cheers,
                > >
                > >Ross
                >
                > And those "PC" questions. I do not know about memory and such. Should
                > not be on an electronics exam... Those are computer technician
                > questions, as are monitor resolution, disk drive interface, etc.
                >
                > Dave
                > (87%)
                >
              • Stefan Trethan
                I also did 91, most I failed were the radio questions. I have an issue with the following questions specifically: (DO NOT READ NOW IF YOU WANT TO TAKE THE
                Message 7 of 29 , Jul 29, 2010
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                  I also did 91, most I failed were the radio questions.

                  I have an issue with the following questions specifically:

                  (DO NOT READ NOW IF YOU WANT TO TAKE THE TEST; READ LATER)





                  When measuring for 1000vdc in a high-impedance circuit, you would most
                  likely prefer an analog VOM over a DMM for:

                  1. X Convenience
                  2. ? Accuracy
                  3. X Safety
                  4. X Overload protection

                  What? What BS is that? In a high impedance circuit you would use a low
                  impedance VOM to load it right down and influence the signal?
                  Nonsense!


                  The charging rate for a NiCad or Ni-MH battery should not exceed___%
                  of its AHr, or ampere-hour rating.

                  1. ? 5
                  2. ? 10
                  3. ? 25
                  4. X 100

                  10% of Ah? That may be true for a crap float charger of 20 years ago,
                  today this type of battery is charged up to 1C easily! They should
                  update their test.
                  (I design chargers for a living, so being marked down on this question
                  offends me).



                  ST


                  On Thu, Jul 29, 2010 at 8:21 AM, ae5ew <ae5ew.us@...> wrote:
                  > I'll bet more than one electronics tech works on PDx. Charles  AE5EW
                  >
                  > --- In Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com, DaveC <davec2468@...> wrote:
                  >>
                  >> >Of course you did well. No one can take that away from you. Although I
                  >> >am electronics engineer, there are some areas that I have never had to
                  >> >work in since graduating nearly 40 years ago ... motors and generators
                  >> >and the old left hand rule for example.
                  >> >
                  >> >Cheers,
                  >> >
                  >> >Ross
                  >>
                  >> And those "PC" questions. I do not know about memory and such. Should
                  >> not be on an electronics exam... Those are computer technician
                  >> questions, as are monitor resolution, disk drive interface, etc.
                  >>
                  >> Dave
                  >> (87%)
                  >>
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > ------------------------------------
                  >
                  > Please trim excess when replyingYahoo! Groups Links
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                • Donald H Locker
                  91%/82questions first go. There were a number of questions whose wording was very vague, IMO. And I definitely would not have chosen a VOM over a DMM for
                  Message 8 of 29 , Jul 29, 2010
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                    91%/82questions first go. There were a number of questions whose wording was very vague, IMO. And I definitely would not have chosen a VOM over a DMM for "accuracy"; DB9 isn't even a DB connector (only a DB-25 is; the 9-pin D-submini connector is a DE); I wouldn't short the power cap to chassis ground necessarily (might be an isolated supply); things like that.

                    But that's like a lot of the multiple choice tests I've taken. If you've taken the course, you'll understand the instructor's bias and answer the questions the way the instructors are asking them, with those built-in biases.

                    So we all know about the same amount of the reasonably-phrased common electronics questions. And everyone is missing the strangely worded or specialty questions, even if they are within our specialty :)

                    Donald.
                    --
                    "Plain Text" email -- it's an accessibility issue
                    () no proprietary attachments; no html mail
                    /\ ascii ribbon campaign - <www.asciiribbon.org>

                    ----- Original Message -----

                    > From: "blue_eagle74" <blue_eagle74@...>
                    > To: "Electronics 101" <Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com>
                    > Sent: Wednesday, July 28, 2010 10:43:33 PM
                    > Subject: [Electronics_101] Practice exam
                    >
                    > I did the Electronics Associate Practice Exam at
                    > http://www.eta-i.org/practice_exams.html
                    >
                    > I got an 88%. 79 out of 100 questions. How many can you get?
                    >
                    > Brian
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > ------------------------------------
                    >
                    > Please trim excess when replyingYahoo! Groups Links
                    >
                    >
                    >
                  • Stefan Trethan
                    I agree. It s a lot more about understanding the questions and the viewpoint of the one who wrote them rather than understanding the subject to get the last
                    Message 9 of 29 , Jul 29, 2010
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                      I agree. It's a lot more about understanding the questions and the
                      viewpoint of the one who wrote them rather than understanding the
                      subject to get the last 10% right.


                      ST

                      On Thu, Jul 29, 2010 at 1:20 PM, Donald H Locker <dhlocker@...> wrote:

                      > But that's like a lot of the multiple choice tests I've taken.  If you've taken the course, you'll understand the instructor's bias and answer the questions the way the instructors are asking them, with those built-in biases.
                      >
                    • Derek Koonce
                      Nice test. I got 9 wrong - accounting for the bad wording issues. The computational questions could be done in the head since the wrong answers are quite off.
                      Message 10 of 29 , Jul 29, 2010
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                        Nice test. I got 9 wrong - accounting for the bad wording issues. The
                        computational questions could be done in the head since the wrong
                        answers are quite off. Also, there is quite a bit of old technology
                        being tested - such as, a recent topic, heatsink while soldering.
                        Overall, I'm at 85%.

                        Thanks for the fun. Oh, EE for the last 23 years with HAM license and a
                        consultant.

                        Derek Koonce
                        DDK Interactive Consulting Services



                        Ross McKenzie wrote:
                        >
                        >
                        > blue_eagle74 wrote:
                        > > I did the Electronics Associate Practice Exam at
                        > http://www.eta-i.org/practice_exams.html
                        > >
                        > > I got an 88%. 79 out of 100 questions. How many can you get?
                        > >
                        > > Brian
                        > >
                        > 91% and 81 first go. The wording ... and spelling (eg "main" instead of
                        > "maintain"), could be improved.
                        >
                        > Cheers,
                        >
                        > Ross
                        >
                        >
                        >
                      • K R
                        I got 87% on my first try........... ________________________________ From: Ross McKenzie To: Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com Sent:
                        Message 11 of 29 , Jul 29, 2010
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                          I got 87% on my first try...........




                          ________________________________
                          From: Ross McKenzie <valusoft@...>
                          To: Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com
                          Sent: Wed, July 28, 2010 10:55:39 PM
                          Subject: Re: [Electronics_101] Practice exam

                          blue_eagle74 wrote:
                          > I did the Electronics Associate Practice Exam at
                          >http://www.eta-i.org/practice_exams.html
                          >
                          > I got an 88%. 79 out of 100 questions. How many can you get?
                          >
                          > Brian

                          91% and 81 first go. The wording ... and spelling (eg "main" instead of
                          "maintain"), could be improved.

                          Cheers,

                          Ross


                          ------------------------------------

                          Please trim excess when replyingYahoo! Groups Links






                          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        • K R
                          Yeah I niticed that! ________________________________ From: blue_eagle74 To: Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com Sent: Wed, July 28, 2010
                          Message 12 of 29 , Jul 29, 2010
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                            Yeah I niticed that!




                            ________________________________
                            From: blue_eagle74 <blue_eagle74@...>
                            To: Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com
                            Sent: Wed, July 28, 2010 11:04:19 PM
                            Subject: [Electronics_101] Re: Practice exam

                            Good job. I have learned from books and the web and thouhgt I did good.
                            Brian
                            > 91% and 81 first go. The wording ... and spelling (eg "main" instead of
                            > "maintain"), could be improved.
                            >
                            > Cheers,
                            >
                            > Ross
                            >




                            ------------------------------------

                            Please trim excess when replyingYahoo! Groups Links






                            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                          • DanielW
                            Judging by the PC questions, I think this test IS 20 years old. For instance, there was a question about extended memory , with the correct answer being
                            Message 13 of 29 , Jul 29, 2010
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                              Judging by the PC questions, I think this test IS 20 years old. For instance, there was a question about "extended memory", with the correct answer being memory over 1MB. WTF? That ceased to be relevant 15 years ago. The question about EGA, VGA, XGA, etc. was dumb too; no one's used EGA in about 18 years, and now we either go by actual numerical resolution, or things like "720p", "1080p", etc. (since most LCD monitors these days are derived from HDTVs). Now, they DID have a question about computer disk drives which mentioned SATA, so they've obviously updated the test in the last 8-10 years, but why'd they keep the stupid extended memory question?

                              There was also a bad question about some capacitors in parallel, with one of the value being 0.47 pf. That should have read 0.47 uf, or else they indicated the wrong answer as being correct.

                              I give this test 3 out of 5 stars. Some of the questions are pretty good, but too many of them are either just plain wrong, extremely obsolete (mainly the computer stuff), or not worded well.

                              Dan


                              --- In Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com, Stefan Trethan <stefan_trethan@...> wrote:
                              >
                              > 10% of Ah? That may be true for a crap float charger of 20 years ago,
                              > today this type of battery is charged up to 1C easily! They should
                              > update their test.
                            • K R
                              I looked into becoming a CET about 20 years ago, but I changed my mind after learning that most companies have never heard of it! So I concluded it would be
                              Message 14 of 29 , Jul 29, 2010
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                                I looked into becoming a CET about 20 years ago, but I changed my mind after
                                learning that most companies have never heard of it! So I concluded it would be
                                just a waste of time and money!! Maybe things are different today?




                                ________________________________
                                From: DanielW <daniel@...>
                                To: Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com
                                Sent: Thu, July 29, 2010 1:27:44 PM
                                Subject: [Electronics_101] Re: Practice exam

                                Judging by the PC questions, I think this test IS 20 years old.  For instance,
                                there was a question about "extended memory", with the correct answer being
                                memory over 1MB.  WTF?  That ceased to be relevant 15 years ago.  The question
                                about EGA, VGA, XGA, etc. was dumb too; no one's used EGA in about 18 years, and
                                now we either go by actual numerical resolution, or things like "720p", "1080p",
                                etc. (since most LCD monitors these days are derived from HDTVs).  Now, they DID
                                have a question about computer disk drives which mentioned SATA, so they've
                                obviously updated the test in the last 8-10 years, but why'd they keep the
                                stupid extended memory question?

                                There was also a bad question about some capacitors in parallel, with one of the
                                value being 0.47 pf.  That should have read 0.47 uf, or else they indicated the
                                wrong answer as being correct.

                                I give this test 3 out of 5 stars.  Some of the questions are pretty good, but
                                too many of them are either just plain wrong, extremely obsolete (mainly the
                                computer stuff), or not worded well.

                                Dan


                                --- In Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com, Stefan Trethan <stefan_trethan@...>
                                wrote:
                                >
                                > 10% of Ah? That may be true for a crap float charger of 20 years ago,
                                > today this type of battery is charged up to 1C easily! They should
                                > update their test.




                                ------------------------------------

                                Please trim excess when replyingYahoo! Groups Links






                                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                              • alienrelics
                                To add to the confusion, there is a CET by ETA (where this practice exam comes from) and a CET by ISCET (the certification I and other techs in this area
                                Message 15 of 29 , Jul 29, 2010
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                                  To add to the confusion, there is a CET by ETA (where this practice exam comes from) and a CET by ISCET (the certification I and other techs in this area hold).

                                  I am only a few questions in and see this:

                                  An LED:
                                  ? only emits visible light when forward biased.
                                  ? can be used as a fiber optic signal source.
                                  ? does not need high current flow protection.
                                  ? may send or receive light signals.


                                  Well, an LED only emits light when forward biased, not counting strange varieties of LASER diodes that I may vaguely recall.

                                  They can be used as a fiber optic signal source. Not a really good one, but see below.

                                  LEDs may be used to send and receive light signals. In fact, there was a huge patent battle over that very subject between Don Lancaster ( http://www.tinaja.com ) and Bell Labs.

                                  I'm about to answer it, let's see what it says when I pick the obvious first choice:
                                  The only one it likes is "can be used as a fiber optic signal source."

                                  Hah! A few questions later:
                                  "A light emitting diode will light when: "
                                  Correct answer:
                                  "When it is forward biased."

                                  Lots more questionable answers.

                                  So I'd take your score with a grain of salt.

                                  Steve Greenfield AE7HD
                                  CET
                                  ET
                                  EET
                                  etc.


                                  --- In Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com, K R <accoil48@...> wrote:
                                  >
                                  > I looked into becoming a CET about 20 years ago, but I changed my mind after
                                  > learning that most companies have never heard of it! So I concluded it would be
                                  > just a waste of time and money!! Maybe things are different today?
                                  >
                                  >
                                  >
                                  >
                                  > ________________________________
                                  > From: DanielW <daniel@...>
                                  > To: Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com
                                  > Sent: Thu, July 29, 2010 1:27:44 PM
                                  > Subject: [Electronics_101] Re: Practice exam
                                  >
                                  > Judging by the PC questions, I think this test IS 20 years old.  For instance,
                                  > there was a question about "extended memory", with the correct answer being
                                  > memory over 1MB.  WTF?  That ceased to be relevant 15 years ago.  The question
                                  > about EGA, VGA, XGA, etc. was dumb too; no one's used EGA in about 18 years, and
                                  > now we either go by actual numerical resolution, or things like "720p", "1080p",
                                  > etc. (since most LCD monitors these days are derived from HDTVs).  Now, they DID
                                  > have a question about computer disk drives which mentioned SATA, so they've
                                  > obviously updated the test in the last 8-10 years, but why'd they keep the
                                  > stupid extended memory question?
                                  >
                                  > There was also a bad question about some capacitors in parallel, with one of the
                                  > value being 0.47 pf.  That should have read 0.47 uf, or else they indicated the
                                  > wrong answer as being correct.
                                  >
                                  > I give this test 3 out of 5 stars.  Some of the questions are pretty good, but
                                  > too many of them are either just plain wrong, extremely obsolete (mainly the
                                  > computer stuff), or not worded well.
                                  >
                                  > Dan
                                  >
                                  >
                                  > --- In Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com, Stefan Trethan <stefan_trethan@>
                                  > wrote:
                                  > >
                                  > > 10% of Ah? That may be true for a crap float charger of 20 years ago,
                                  > > today this type of battery is charged up to 1C easily! They should
                                  > > update their test.
                                  >
                                  >
                                  >
                                  >
                                  > ------------------------------------
                                  >
                                  > Please trim excess when replyingYahoo! Groups Links
                                  >
                                  >
                                  >
                                  >
                                  >
                                  >
                                  > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                  >
                                • rtstofer
                                  ... The PC questions may not be relevant to today s PCs but they might be interesting for embedded systems using a 486 (my firewall uses one). Sometimes
                                  Message 16 of 29 , Jul 29, 2010
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                                    --- In Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com, "DanielW" <daniel@...> wrote:
                                    >
                                    > Judging by the PC questions, I think this test IS 20 years old. For instance, there was a question about "extended memory", with the correct answer being memory over 1MB. WTF? That ceased to be relevant 15 years ago. The question about EGA, VGA, XGA, etc. was dumb too; no one's used EGA in about 18 years, and now we either go by actual numerical resolution, or things like "720p", "1080p", etc. (since most LCD monitors these days are derived from HDTVs). Now, they DID have a question about computer disk drives which mentioned SATA, so they've obviously updated the test in the last 8-10 years, but why'd they keep the stupid extended memory question?
                                    >
                                    > There was also a bad question about some capacitors in parallel, with one of the value being 0.47 pf. That should have read 0.47 uf, or else they indicated the wrong answer as being correct.
                                    >
                                    > I give this test 3 out of 5 stars. Some of the questions are pretty good, but too many of them are either just plain wrong, extremely obsolete (mainly the computer stuff), or not worded well.
                                    >
                                    > Dan
                                    >

                                    The PC questions may not be relevant to today's PCs but they might be interesting for embedded systems using a 486 (my firewall uses one). Sometimes graphics controllers inside uC's don't handle the HD resolutions and, perhaps, VGA is the best they can do. Without a bunch of effort, VGA can be implemented in an FPGA. Sure, there's not much point in messing around with CGA but if it'll do the job, it's worth knowing about.

                                    From time to time, I still use IBM PC DOS 7 with Borland's Turbo Pascal (or Turbo C) and things like extended memory do come up. From time to time... Why would I use an old system like this? Well, for graphics applications, there isn't much around that is as easy to use as Turbo Graphics with Turbo Pascal.

                                    I gave up after the first 50 questions; the test was boring even though I had to guess at all the radio/TV and RF questions. Not my thing.

                                    Richard
                                  • John Eh
                                    Yeah and there should be questions on the Altair in there. What good is programming if you can t manually input parallel data by flipping switches and
                                    Message 17 of 29 , Jul 29, 2010
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                                      Yeah and there should be questions on the Altair in there. What good is
                                      programming if you can't manually input parallel data by flipping
                                      switches and strobing it. It is so simple: there are only *9* buttons.
                                      Show my a simpler system than that! I heard that my friend Bill took a
                                      break from saving Africa and is working on an IP stack for the Altair
                                      making it useful again. Hey if he could write basic in 8k why not an IP
                                      stack?

                                      ttyl
                                      John


                                      On 7/29/2010 5:17 PM, rtstofer wrote:
                                      > The PC questions may not be relevant to today's PCs but they might be interesting for embedded systems using a 486 (my firewall uses one). Sometimes graphics controllers inside uC's don't handle the HD resolutions and, perhaps, VGA is the best they can do. Without a bunch of effort, VGA can be implemented in an FPGA. Sure, there's not much point in messing around with CGA but if it'll do the job, it's worth knowing about.
                                      >
                                      > From time to time, I still use IBM PC DOS 7 with Borland's Turbo Pascal (or Turbo C) and things like extended memory do come up. From time to time... Why would I use an old system like this? Well, for graphics applications, there isn't much around that is as easy to use as Turbo Graphics with Turbo Pascal.
                                      >
                                      > I gave up after the first 50 questions; the test was boring even though I had to guess at all the radio/TV and RF questions. Not my thing.
                                      >
                                      > Richard
                                      >
                                      >
                                    • Donald H Locker
                                      That LED on frosted me, too. I picked two wrong answers before finding the right one. I know I could make a case for all four. I once used an LED as the
                                      Message 18 of 29 , Jul 29, 2010
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                                        That LED on frosted me, too. I picked two "wrong" answers before finding the "right" one. I know I could make a case for all four.

                                        I once used an LED as the light sensor for a colour photography exposure meter. (Wasn't as good as I had hoped, but it did sort-of work.) That was back in the late '70s or early '80s. Interesting phenomenon and fun to exploit.

                                        Donald.
                                        --
                                        "Plain Text" email -- it's an accessibility issue
                                        () no proprietary attachments; no html mail
                                        /\ ascii ribbon campaign - <www.asciiribbon.org>

                                        ----- Original Message -----

                                        > From: "alienrelics" <alienrelics@...>
                                        > To: "Electronics 101" <Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com>
                                        > Sent: Thursday, July 29, 2010 5:17:14 PM
                                        > Subject: [Electronics_101] Re: Practice exam
                                        >
                                        > To add to the confusion, there is a CET by ETA (where this practice
                                        > exam comes from) and a CET by ISCET (the certification I and other
                                        > techs in this area hold).
                                        >
                                        > I am only a few questions in and see this:
                                        >
                                        > An LED:
                                        > ? only emits visible light when forward biased.
                                        > ? can be used as a fiber optic signal source.
                                        > ? does not need high current flow protection.
                                        > ? may send or receive light signals.
                                        >
                                        >
                                        > Well, an LED only emits light when forward biased, not counting
                                        > strange varieties of LASER diodes that I may vaguely recall.
                                        >
                                        > They can be used as a fiber optic signal source. Not a really good
                                        > one, but see below.
                                        >
                                        > LEDs may be used to send and receive light signals. In fact, there was
                                        > a huge patent battle over that very subject between Don Lancaster (
                                        > http://www.tinaja.com ) and Bell Labs.
                                        >
                                        > I'm about to answer it, let's see what it says when I pick the obvious
                                        > first choice:
                                        > The only one it likes is "can be used as a fiber optic signal
                                        > source."

                                        [snip]
                                      • bruce_fleming
                                        There programs being offered in Electronics Engineering Technicians are going into more areas concerning computers and so the questions related to those fields
                                        Message 19 of 29 , Jul 29, 2010
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                                          There programs being offered in Electronics Engineering Technicians are going into more areas concerning computers and so the questions related to those fields stem from digital electronics.

                                          A search on many community college programs in the electronics field will yield programs dealing heavily in digital electronics, microcontrollers, and computers.

                                          --- In Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com, DaveC <davec2468@...> wrote:
                                          >
                                          > >Of course you did well. No one can take that away from you. Although I
                                          > >am electronics engineer, there are some areas that I have never had to
                                          > >work in since graduating nearly 40 years ago ... motors and generators
                                          > >and the old left hand rule for example.
                                          > >
                                          > >Cheers,
                                          > >
                                          > >Ross
                                          >
                                          > And those "PC" questions. I do not know about memory and such. Should
                                          > not be on an electronics exam... Those are computer technician
                                          > questions, as are monitor resolution, disk drive interface, etc.
                                          >
                                          > Dave
                                          > (87%)
                                          >
                                        • ae5ew
                                          For those who enjoy inputting data via switches, try the DEC PDP-8, Charles AE5EW
                                          Message 20 of 29 , Jul 29, 2010
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                                            For those who enjoy inputting data via switches, try the DEC PDP-8, Charles AE5EW

                                            --- In Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com, John Eh <jwoolsey@...> wrote:
                                            >
                                            > Yeah and there should be questions on the Altair in there. What good is
                                            > programming if you can't manually input parallel data by flipping
                                            > switches and strobing it. It is so simple: there are only *9* buttons.
                                            > Show my a simpler system than that! I heard that my friend Bill took a
                                            > break from saving Africa and is working on an IP stack for the Altair
                                            > making it useful again. Hey if he could write basic in 8k why not an IP
                                            > stack?
                                            >
                                            > ttyl
                                            > John
                                            >
                                            >
                                            > On 7/29/2010 5:17 PM, rtstofer wrote:
                                            > > The PC questions may not be relevant to today's PCs but they might be interesting for embedded systems using a 486 (my firewall uses one). Sometimes graphics controllers inside uC's don't handle the HD resolutions and, perhaps, VGA is the best they can do. Without a bunch of effort, VGA can be implemented in an FPGA. Sure, there's not much point in messing around with CGA but if it'll do the job, it's worth knowing about.
                                            > >
                                            > > From time to time, I still use IBM PC DOS 7 with Borland's Turbo Pascal (or Turbo C) and things like extended memory do come up. From time to time... Why would I use an old system like this? Well, for graphics applications, there isn't much around that is as easy to use as Turbo Graphics with Turbo Pascal.
                                            > >
                                            > > I gave up after the first 50 questions; the test was boring even though I had to guess at all the radio/TV and RF questions. Not my thing.
                                            > >
                                            > > Richard
                                            > >
                                            > >
                                            >
                                          • DaveC
                                            ... We had a PDP-8 in my college (DEC donated much equipment to our community college). Paper tape was a valued commodity then. Switch entry was the order of
                                            Message 21 of 29 , Jul 29, 2010
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                                              >For those who enjoy inputting data via switches, try the DEC PDP-8,
                                              >Charles AE5EW

                                              We had a PDP-8 in my college (DEC donated much equipment to our
                                              community college). Paper tape was a valued commodity then. Switch
                                              entry was the order of the day for students. A better learning
                                              method, I think...

                                              Dave
                                            • DanielW
                                              This was a trick question, and another reason I didn t think this was a great test. The first answer is wrong because of the word visible . Lots of LEDs
                                              Message 22 of 29 , Jul 30, 2010
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                                                This was a trick question, and another reason I didn't think this was a great test. The first answer is "wrong" because of the word "visible". Lots of LEDs emit infrared light, which is invisible to humans. So if you read the question literally, it's wrong. An LED does not only emit visible light when forward biased, it may emit invisible light.

                                                Very bad question.

                                                Dan

                                                --- In Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com, "alienrelics" <alienrelics@...> wrote:
                                                >
                                                > I am only a few questions in and see this:
                                                >
                                                > An LED:
                                                > ? only emits visible light when forward biased.
                                                > ? can be used as a fiber optic signal source.
                                                > ? does not need high current flow protection.
                                                > ? may send or receive light signals.
                                                >
                                                >
                                                > Well, an LED only emits light when forward biased, not counting strange varieties of LASER diodes that I may vaguely recall.
                                                >
                                                > They can be used as a fiber optic signal source. Not a really good one, but see below.

                                                > The only one it likes is "can be used as a fiber optic signal source."
                                              • DanielW
                                                I disagree. Can you even buy 486s any more? Embedded systems do NOT use x86 these days, they use ARM (and sometimes PPC). ARM s power consumption is far
                                                Message 23 of 29 , Jul 30, 2010
                                                • 0 Attachment
                                                  I disagree. Can you even buy 486s any more? Embedded systems do NOT use x86 these days, they use ARM (and sometimes PPC). ARM's power consumption is far less than x86.

                                                  Sure, a lot of embedded systems use VGA-resolution LCDs, but not CGA, and one of the test questions mentioned that. No one's used CGA for over 20 years now, unless they were using an antique. The whole "VGA", "EGA", "CGA", xGA etc. thing is completely obsolete; no one ever uses those acronyms any more except monitor marketers who add in weird things like "WUQVRHXGA", when intelligent shoppers are just looking at the resolution: is it 1920x1080 or 1920x1200?

                                                  Maybe you like to use an obsolete OS and language, but you can't buy any of those products any more; they're 20 years old. And for graphics applications, there's lots of stuff far easier to program than old junk like that. In the last couple decades, a lot of convenient toolkits have been devised to make GUI programming far simpler. Check out Qt, for instance.

                                                  Dan


                                                  --- In Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com, "rtstofer" <rstofer@...> wrote:
                                                  > The PC questions may not be relevant to today's PCs but they might be interesting for embedded systems using a 486 (my firewall uses one). Sometimes graphics controllers inside uC's don't handle the HD resolutions and, perhaps, VGA is the best they can do. Without a bunch of effort, VGA can be implemented in an FPGA. Sure, there's not much point in messing around with CGA but if it'll do the job, it's worth knowing about.
                                                  >
                                                  > From time to time, I still use IBM PC DOS 7 with Borland's Turbo Pascal (or Turbo C) and things like extended memory do come up. From time to time... Why would I use an old system like this? Well, for graphics applications, there isn't much around that is as easy to use as Turbo Graphics with Turbo Pascal.
                                                • rtstofer
                                                  ... I wouldn t be all that certain! My Soekris firewall uses a 486 class CPU: http://www.soekris.com/net4501.htm Sure, it runs a little faster but not all
                                                  Message 24 of 29 , Jul 30, 2010
                                                  • 0 Attachment
                                                    --- In Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com, "DanielW" <daniel@...> wrote:
                                                    >
                                                    > I disagree. Can you even buy 486s any more? Embedded systems do NOT use x86 these days, they use ARM (and sometimes PPC). ARM's power consumption is far less than x86.
                                                    >

                                                    I wouldn't be all that certain! My Soekris firewall uses a 486 class CPU: http://www.soekris.com/net4501.htm Sure, it runs a little faster but not all that much at 133 MHz.

                                                    No question about power consumption but who cares? It's a little box that sits under my WAP and has some blinking LEDs. I set up the IP tables years ago and it just does its thing - every single day. It could run on Gerbils for all I care as long as it makes my network invisible.

                                                    > Maybe you like to use an obsolete OS and language, but you can't buy any of those products any more; they're 20 years old. And for graphics applications, there's lots of stuff far easier to program than old junk like that. In the last couple decades, a lot of convenient toolkits have been devised to make GUI programming far simpler. Check out Qt, for instance.
                                                    >
                                                    > Dan

                                                    There are many advantages to DOS where it can be applied. Among other things, Windows/Linux OS issues don't get in the way and critical timing may be more easily achieved. Cooperative multi-tasking is only an advantage if you want to cooperate.

                                                    In fact, the OS (DOS) doesn't really get involved with the application UNLESS it is specifically called. I can write all the interrupt driven code I want and NEVER have to get involved with the kernel.

                                                    It's true that modern OS's provide a LOT of services. Sometimes they aren't necessary.

                                                    I'm not certain how long it would take to become proficient (or even just adequate) with Qt. I doubt that it is as easy to use as Turbo Graphics even though I'll grant that it provides much more capability (if that is important).

                                                    My application was trivial: display a 16x16 grid of cells to model the layout for MicroMouse maze solving competition. Then display 'something' moving through the grid as directed by the flood-fill algorithm. The entire exercise took less than a day. No, I didn't build a mouse icon, I just used a thick-walled circle that contrasted the background. The algorithm was important, not the graphic images. Oh, and each cell had a display of the numeric value of its distance from the goal (or starting point, depending on direction of travel). So, a little text in the graphic display. And it used traditional VGA = 640x480 with 16 colors.

                                                    IBM was selling PC DOS 2000 long after 2000 because I bought a copy around 2005 or 2006. I don't see it on their website today so they may have discontinued it in the last couple of years.

                                                    Yes, I use Linux and Windows. And, yes, I code for ARM, AVR and PIC as well and I have built a couple of retro computers with FPGAs. But, sometimes, you just want to get something done in a hurry. You just don't want to diddle around with IO pins of the uC's and you would just as soon avoid the APIs (and the learning curves) for the large OS's.

                                                    But, then, I'm the guy who still plays with CP/M and IBM 1130 Disk Monitor Ver 2 using Fortran IV on both.

                                                    I use air nailers in my shop but I still have a hammer or two in my toolbox.

                                                    Richard
                                                  • Donald H Locker
                                                    It was a bad question, but I disagree with the wrong ness of the first answer. If the proffered answer were emits _only_ visible light when forward biased.
                                                    Message 25 of 29 , Jul 30, 2010
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                                                      It was a bad question, but I disagree with the "wrong"ness of the first answer. If the proffered answer were "emits _only_ visible light when forward biased." [my emphasis] then the answer is wrong, but as stated "only emits visible light when forward biased." (note the order of the first two words) is a legitimate answer to the question.

                                                      Of course, we also know that an LED may be induced to emit light (as well as smoke and semiconductor bits) when reversed biased, too, if only for an instant. You just have to have a sufficient power source to cause it to flash into the hereafter.

                                                      Donald.
                                                      --
                                                      "Plain Text" email -- it's an accessibility issue
                                                      () no proprietary attachments; no html mail
                                                      /\ ascii ribbon campaign - <www.asciiribbon.org>

                                                      ----- Original Message -----

                                                      > From: "DanielW" <daniel@...>
                                                      > To: "Electronics 101" <Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com>
                                                      > Sent: Friday, July 30, 2010 1:34:29 PM
                                                      > Subject: [Electronics_101] Re: Practice exam
                                                      >
                                                      > This was a trick question, and another reason I didn't think this was
                                                      > a great test. The first answer is "wrong" because of the word
                                                      > "visible". Lots of LEDs emit infrared light, which is invisible to
                                                      > humans. So if you read the question literally, it's wrong. An LED
                                                      > does not only emit visible light when forward biased, it may emit
                                                      > invisible light.
                                                      >
                                                      > Very bad question.
                                                      >
                                                      > Dan
                                                      >
                                                      > --- In Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com, "alienrelics"
                                                      > <alienrelics@...> wrote:
                                                      > >
                                                      > > I am only a few questions in and see this:
                                                      > >
                                                      > > An LED:
                                                      > > ? only emits visible light when forward biased.
                                                      > > ? can be used as a fiber optic signal source.
                                                      > > ? does not need high current flow protection.
                                                      > > ? may send or receive light signals.
                                                      > >
                                                      > >
                                                      > > Well, an LED only emits light when forward biased, not counting
                                                      > strange varieties of LASER diodes that I may vaguely recall.
                                                      > >
                                                      > > They can be used as a fiber optic signal source. Not a really good
                                                      > one, but see below.
                                                      >
                                                      > > The only one it likes is "can be used as a fiber optic signal
                                                      > source."
                                                      >
                                                    • John Eh
                                                      There is Free Dos and DR Dos around somewhere if you need it. But considering most of code cost is maintainence you might want to leave something a little more
                                                      Message 26 of 29 , Jul 30, 2010
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                                                        There is Free Dos and DR Dos around somewhere if you need it. But
                                                        considering most of code cost is maintainence you might want to leave
                                                        something a little more modern for the person after you to support.

                                                        ttyl
                                                        John


                                                        On 7/30/2010 4:26 PM, rtstofer wrote:
                                                        >
                                                        > --- In Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com, "DanielW"<daniel@...> wrote:
                                                        >
                                                        >> I disagree. Can you even buy 486s any more? Embedded systems do NOT use x86 these days, they use ARM (and sometimes PPC). ARM's power consumption is far less than x86.
                                                        >>
                                                        >>
                                                        > I wouldn't be all that certain! My Soekris firewall uses a 486 class CPU: http://www.soekris.com/net4501.htm Sure, it runs a little faster but not all that much at 133 MHz.
                                                        >
                                                        > No question about power consumption but who cares? It's a little box that sits under my WAP and has some blinking LEDs. I set up the IP tables years ago and it just does its thing - every single day. It could run on Gerbils for all I care as long as it makes my network invisible.
                                                        >
                                                        >
                                                        >> Maybe you like to use an obsolete OS and language, but you can't buy any of those products any more; they're 20 years old. And for graphics applications, there's lots of stuff far easier to program than old junk like that. In the last couple decades, a lot of convenient toolkits have been devised to make GUI programming far simpler. Check out Qt, for instance.
                                                        >>
                                                        >> Dan
                                                        >>
                                                        > There are many advantages to DOS where it can be applied. Among other things, Windows/Linux OS issues don't get in the way and critical timing may be more easily achieved. Cooperative multi-tasking is only an advantage if you want to cooperate.
                                                        >
                                                        > In fact, the OS (DOS) doesn't really get involved with the application UNLESS it is specifically called. I can write all the interrupt driven code I want and NEVER have to get involved with the kernel.
                                                        >
                                                        > It's true that modern OS's provide a LOT of services. Sometimes they aren't necessary.
                                                        >
                                                        > I'm not certain how long it would take to become proficient (or even just adequate) with Qt. I doubt that it is as easy to use as Turbo Graphics even though I'll grant that it provides much more capability (if that is important).
                                                        >
                                                        > My application was trivial: display a 16x16 grid of cells to model the layout for MicroMouse maze solving competition. Then display 'something' moving through the grid as directed by the flood-fill algorithm. The entire exercise took less than a day. No, I didn't build a mouse icon, I just used a thick-walled circle that contrasted the background. The algorithm was important, not the graphic images. Oh, and each cell had a display of the numeric value of its distance from the goal (or starting point, depending on direction of travel). So, a little text in the graphic display. And it used traditional VGA = 640x480 with 16 colors.
                                                        >
                                                        > IBM was selling PC DOS 2000 long after 2000 because I bought a copy around 2005 or 2006. I don't see it on their website today so they may have discontinued it in the last couple of years.
                                                        >
                                                        > Yes, I use Linux and Windows. And, yes, I code for ARM, AVR and PIC as well and I have built a couple of retro computers with FPGAs. But, sometimes, you just want to get something done in a hurry. You just don't want to diddle around with IO pins of the uC's and you would just as soon avoid the APIs (and the learning curves) for the large OS's.
                                                        >
                                                        > But, then, I'm the guy who still plays with CP/M and IBM 1130 Disk Monitor Ver 2 using Fortran IV on both.
                                                        >
                                                        > I use air nailers in my shop but I still have a hammer or two in my toolbox.
                                                        >
                                                        > Richard
                                                        >
                                                        >
                                                        >
                                                        >
                                                      • Kerim F
                                                        ... Perhaps I am wrong, but I think in these days, the goal of a general serious test in electronics, is to find out the field/branch for which the answers are
                                                        Message 27 of 29 , Jul 30, 2010
                                                        • 0 Attachment
                                                          --- In Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com, "blue_eagle74" <blue_eagle74@...> wrote:
                                                          >
                                                          > I did the Electronics Associate Practice Exam at http://www.eta-i.org/practice_exams.html
                                                          >
                                                          > I got an 88%. 79 out of 100 questions. How many can you get?
                                                          >
                                                          > Brian
                                                          >

                                                          Perhaps I am wrong, but I think in these days, the goal of a general serious test in electronics, is to find out the field/branch for which the answers are 100% right. But if the job will not need updating some systems (hardware or software if not both for some specific applications) or creating new ones then the total score should be considered.

                                                          Kerim
                                                        • ae5ew
                                                          I own a 486 transportable. Charles AE5EW
                                                          Message 28 of 29 , Jul 31, 2010
                                                          • 0 Attachment
                                                            I own a 486 transportable. Charles AE5EW

                                                            --- In Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com, "DanielW" <daniel@...> wrote:
                                                            >
                                                            > I disagree. Can you even buy 486s any more? Embedded systems do NOT use x86 these days, they use ARM (and sometimes PPC). ARM's power consumption is far less than x86.
                                                            >
                                                            > Sure, a lot of embedded systems use VGA-resolution LCDs, but not CGA, and one of the test questions mentioned that. No one's used CGA for over 20 years now, unless they were using an antique. The whole "VGA", "EGA", "CGA", xGA etc. thing is completely obsolete; no one ever uses those acronyms any more except monitor marketers who add in weird things like "WUQVRHXGA", when intelligent shoppers are just looking at the resolution: is it 1920x1080 or 1920x1200?
                                                            >
                                                            > Maybe you like to use an obsolete OS and language, but you can't buy any of those products any more; they're 20 years old. And for graphics applications, there's lots of stuff far easier to program than old junk like that. In the last couple decades, a lot of convenient toolkits have been devised to make GUI programming far simpler. Check out Qt, for instance.
                                                            >
                                                            > Dan
                                                            >
                                                            >
                                                            > --- In Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com, "rtstofer" <rstofer@> wrote:
                                                            > > The PC questions may not be relevant to today's PCs but they might be interesting for embedded systems using a 486 (my firewall uses one). Sometimes graphics controllers inside uC's don't handle the HD resolutions and, perhaps, VGA is the best they can do. Without a bunch of effort, VGA can be implemented in an FPGA. Sure, there's not much point in messing around with CGA but if it'll do the job, it's worth knowing about.
                                                            > >
                                                            > > From time to time, I still use IBM PC DOS 7 with Borland's Turbo Pascal (or Turbo C) and things like extended memory do come up. From time to time... Why would I use an old system like this? Well, for graphics applications, there isn't much around that is as easy to use as Turbo Graphics with Turbo Pascal.
                                                            >
                                                          • blue_eagle74
                                                            Just wanted to see how everybody would do on the test. All tests will have questionable anwsers and trick questions and outdated questions. Some people add
                                                            Message 29 of 29 , Jul 31, 2010
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                                                              Just wanted to see how everybody would do on the test. All tests will have questionable anwsers and trick questions and outdated questions. Some people add more information than what the questions ask for, thats what makes them hard or questionable. All feedback was good and informative. I think an overall test like this one would give an indication of the user knowledge not a test for just current electronics on say digital logic. As some people have stated, older electronics is still needed in some fields. What I got from this is keep your mind open. When I got my CET in 2000 it was a general test. I passed it with flying colors but I found out it doesnt help in getting a job.

                                                              --- In Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com, "blue_eagle74" <blue_eagle74@...> wrote:
                                                              >
                                                              > I did the Electronics Associate Practice Exam at http://www.eta-i.org/practice_exams.html
                                                              >
                                                              > I got an 88%. 79 out of 100 questions. How many can you get?
                                                              >
                                                              > Brian
                                                              >
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