Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: 3phase supply to single phase load?

Expand Messages
  • ae5ew
    The very top wire(s) of the distribution system is a ground connection for lightning strikes. This helps keep the strike (or most of it) away from the
    Message 1 of 35 , May 31, 2010
    • 0 Attachment
      The very top wire(s) of the distribution system is a ground connection for lightning strikes. This helps keep the strike (or most of it) away from the Hot/Neutral conductors. Lightning stikes hitting the Hot/Neutral conductors usually blow line fuses and transformers. Charles AE5EW

      --- In Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com, JanRwl@... wrote:
      >
      > In a message dated 5/30/2010 10:15:16 A.M. Central Daylight Time,
      > alienrelics@... writes:
      >
      > In the US, you are absolutely -not- allowed to use Ground as a return leg.
      > Hot to Hot, or Hot to Neutral. Ground is -only- for fault currents.<<
      > Look at poles carrying one or two phases, with an occasional transformer.
      > Usually on the very TOP of these poles is a fixture holding a "bare wire"
      > at the top, along all poles, parallel to the phases, which are usually
      > attached to insulators bolted to the "T-bar" or, if only ONE phase, sometimes
      > to an angular insulator fastened directly to the pole, near the top (but far
      > enough DOWN to avoid interaction with that ground at the top!
      >
      > There is usually a Kearney-fastened copper wire to that top-ground, and it
      > that down the pole (grounding the transformer, IF one on that pole) and
      > this ends in a neat spiral of 5 mm copper at the bottom-end of the pole before
      > it was set in the soil.
      >
      > So, you see, the "ground" and the "neutral" are in parallel as that
      > conductor travels along. Due to variation in soil-conductivity and moisture, the
      > "RETURN GROUND" is certainly NOT via soil-only!
      >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
    • ae5ew
      The very top wire(s) of the distribution system is a ground connection for lightning strikes. This helps keep the strike (or most of it) away from the
      Message 35 of 35 , May 31, 2010
      • 0 Attachment
        The very top wire(s) of the distribution system is a ground connection for lightning strikes. This helps keep the strike (or most of it) away from the Hot/Neutral conductors. Lightning stikes hitting the Hot/Neutral conductors usually blow line fuses and transformers. Charles AE5EW

        --- In Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com, JanRwl@... wrote:
        >
        > In a message dated 5/30/2010 10:15:16 A.M. Central Daylight Time,
        > alienrelics@... writes:
        >
        > In the US, you are absolutely -not- allowed to use Ground as a return leg.
        > Hot to Hot, or Hot to Neutral. Ground is -only- for fault currents.<<
        > Look at poles carrying one or two phases, with an occasional transformer.
        > Usually on the very TOP of these poles is a fixture holding a "bare wire"
        > at the top, along all poles, parallel to the phases, which are usually
        > attached to insulators bolted to the "T-bar" or, if only ONE phase, sometimes
        > to an angular insulator fastened directly to the pole, near the top (but far
        > enough DOWN to avoid interaction with that ground at the top!
        >
        > There is usually a Kearney-fastened copper wire to that top-ground, and it
        > that down the pole (grounding the transformer, IF one on that pole) and
        > this ends in a neat spiral of 5 mm copper at the bottom-end of the pole before
        > it was set in the soil.
        >
        > So, you see, the "ground" and the "neutral" are in parallel as that
        > conductor travels along. Due to variation in soil-conductivity and moisture, the
        > "RETURN GROUND" is certainly NOT via soil-only!
        >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.