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Re: Problems with battery charger

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  • alienrelics
    ... You mean voltage, it steps down the voltage. ... Flakes fall off, too. One of the big differences between regular and deep cycle batteries is that deep
    Message 1 of 118 , Mar 1, 2010
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      --- In Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com, Reese <reeza@...> wrote:
      >
      > On 01-Mar-10 06:34, Saurabh Manandhar wrote:
      > > Hello all,
      > >
      > > I recently purchased a 12V lead acid battery charger, and opened it to
      > > see the insides. There's this huge transformer which appears to be
      > > custom made, a rotary switch to select charging current, couple of
      > > fuses and switches, and a Bridge rectifier. I did not see any
      > > capacitor in it.
      > >
      > > What is the effect of not having a capacitor in a charger? How will
      > > the battery cope with it?
      >
      > The transformer steps the mains current down from whatever it is AC
      > to about 12 volts AC. The bridge rectifier takes that as input and
      > outputs about 12 vdc. Some older/better chargers will have a switch
      > for charging 6 volt batteries too, which are still common on some
      > riding lawn mowers and other equipment.

      You mean voltage, it steps down the voltage.



      > Car batteries can be kind of funky, and they do wear out - mostly due
      > to sulfation buildup I think, but also formation of "whiskers" between
      > the lead plates, discharging them too far, and extreme hot or cold when
      > they don't have a full charge for whatever reason.

      Flakes fall off, too. One of the big differences between regular and deep cycle batteries is that deep cycle/deep discharge batteries have much deeper pockets below the plates, so they withstand more flaking before it shorts out a cell.


      > > the charger, it shows about 50V. Any Ideas?
      >
      > 50v? Are you reading the meter correctly? Automotive "12 volts" is
      > actually closer to 12.6 volts with charging circuits in the area of
      > 13.8 volts - for classic wet-cell lead-acid batteries. Some newer
      > systems and battery types actually require more than 14 volts for proper
      > charging but the classic lead-acid battery charging circuit should
      > never exceed 13.8 volts.
      >
      > Sticking one of those less expensive 12.6 volt batteries into one of
      > those newer, higher-voltage systems will fry and cause premature failure
      > of your classic wet-cell lead-acid battery. Put one of those newer,
      > higher-tech batteries in a lower voltage system - the battery will
      > not accept and hold a charge properly. So you really have to look at
      > what the system is designed for (taking note of whether it has been
      > modified), then look at what you are using and make sure everything
      > is compatible with everything else.

      Do you have a reference you can give for this?

      Steve Greenfield
    • Reese
      ... I haven t looked at the PDF but if those are the one-wire alternators that are popular in racing circles, they ve been available in those same racing
      Message 118 of 118 , Mar 8, 2010
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        On 08-Mar-10 08:24, Andrew Mathison wrote:
        > Brushless Alternators!! Great .pdf, easy to understand......
        >
        > How long have they been put into cars?

        I haven't looked at the PDF but if those are the "one-wire" alternators
        that are popular in racing circles, they've been available in those
        same racing circles for at least 20, maybe 25 years or more. I wasn't
        aware they they were being used in any production vehicles.

        Reese
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