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Re: [Electronics_101] Re: So what's all that desulphating about anyhow?

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  • jong kung
    ST, Wouldn t you know it.  I m looking ALL OVER my HD and backup, and it turns out there s an article on current month s Elektor.  It is NOT a proof, but a
    Message 1 of 8 , Jul 1, 2009
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      ST,


      Wouldn't you know it.  I'm looking ALL OVER my HD and backup, and it turns out there's an article on current month's Elektor.  It is NOT a proof, but a circuit.

      :-)

      Download it from here:

      http://depositfiles.com/en/files/r4br1v7g2

      or

      http://kewlshare.com/dl/c32dcd8cbebf/Elektor_2009-07_2009-08.zip.html
      ====

      See page 35 (Desulphater for Car Batteries).


      Jong

      P.S.  I'm pretty sure I read about this in previous mag articles.  I'll let you know IF I find another article (but I think they are approx the same circuit).























      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Stefan Trethan
      Thanks, I quote from it: It is based on research carried out in the United States, which showed conclusively that if you apply short, high-amplitude pulses to
      Message 2 of 8 , Jul 1, 2009
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        Thanks, I quote from it:

        It is based on
        research carried out in the United States,
        which showed conclusively that if you
        apply short, high-amplitude pulses to
        the battery, the resulting ionic agita-
        tion produced at the battery electrodes
        gradually breaks up the lead sulphate
        crystals. Even if you’re a bit sceptical
        about the efectiveness of this process,
        you can try it out for yourself without
        any great financial risk, as the circuit
        required is simple and cheap. Nothing
        ventured, nothing gained!


        end quote.
        research ... showed conclusively , well, where is this research? Sadly
        they don't provide any reference.

        The circuits are all similar, all apply pulses, but the amplitude,
        frequency, and even direction of pulses varies.


        ST



        On Thu, Jul 2, 2009 at 1:59 AM, jong kung<jongkung01@...> wrote:
        > ST,
        >
        >
        > Wouldn't you know it.  I'm looking ALL OVER my HD and backup, and it turns out there's an article on current month's Elektor.  It is NOT a proof, but a circuit.
        >
        > :-)
      • Dave Mucha
        I am not aware of any laboratory testing, but I knew a guy who was involved with the development. As I understand, the depth of the layer, the distance of the
        Message 3 of 8 , Jul 2, 2009
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          I am not aware of any laboratory testing, but I knew a guy who was involved with the development.

          As I understand, the depth of the layer, the distance of the crystals from the battery terminal required different frequencies and amplitude.

          there is no simple way to tune one circuit to one battery. varying the frequency will make sure there is enough power to 'sweep' across the battery.

          As for testing. super simple. a hydromerter is something you can buy at an auto shop for a few dollars. is a diper with different material balls inisde that float at different densities. an industry standard for testing batteries.

          if the batter is low, you run the desuphenator for a month and the reading goes high, it worked.

          There is more negative press from the battery people who see repeat custoemers as part of the business.

          Bottom line is that if your battery tester shows an inprovement, it worked.

          Another test is to charge the battery and then connect a mechanical clock and a light bulb so as to drain the battery. record how long your battery lasted.

          run the desulphanator for the 30 days and test it again.

          Since the circuts are shown on the web and they are so easy to make, the whole unit can be made without too much expense.

          I have heard both sides. some people have had great results, some see no change.

          I had a car battery at the end of it's life. Had a hard time starting, had to jump the car half the time. put a unit on it, within a month, the weather changed and the car was easier to start. within 3 months, did not have to jump the car, sold the car after 3 months... I will not try to figure out what happened, but I do know, since I sold the car, I have never had to jump it !

          The people who are most interested in this technology are the solar power people who need as much out of their batteries as possible.

          Dave



          > The circuits are all similar, all apply pulses, but the amplitude,
          > frequency, and even direction of pulses varies.
          >
          >
          > ST
        • Stefan Trethan
          ... If the reading goes high it just means the battery got charged eventually. What interests me is if the same effect could have been achieved with a DC
          Message 4 of 8 , Jul 2, 2009
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            On Thu, Jul 2, 2009 at 12:27 PM, Dave Mucha<dave_mucha@...> wrote:

            > if the batter is low, you run the desuphenator for a month and the reading goes high, it worked.

            If the reading goes high it just means the battery got charged
            eventually. What interests me is if the same effect could have been
            achieved with a DC charge or not.

            I don't doubt that some of those circuits put energy into the battery,
            the ones which pulse external power, but I'm not convinced that it is
            better than just DC current.

            ST
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