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Re: [Electronics_101] Do Transistors give you Cancer?

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  • jong kung
    ST, ...   I think I mentioned that beginners need to be exposed to just the right about of information, and nothing more.  That comes later.  I still stand
    Message 1 of 81 , Feb 1, 2009
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      ST,


      > Sure it is worth mentioning. Someone might easily come across it when

      > taking old stuff apart for parts or to satisfy curiosity.

      > There's no danger from it, as long as it is left alone. But if someone

      > is like me, having to take everything apart, it is better to know

      > don't you think?

       
      I think I mentioned that beginners need to be exposed to just the right about of information, and nothing more.  That comes later.  I still stand by that statement.
      ===
      > For example beryllium oxide is sometimes used in the microwave oven
      > magnetron, now that would be a typical item for me to break open and
      > have a look inside,

      As for Beryllllllllium something something (in MW oven).... I'll that one go.  I'm not going to lose any sleep over it.  The bigger (real) danger is (beginners) hobbyists electrocuting themself on house current.  Doh...
      ===
      What was we saying... Oh Cancer.  No don't worry.  On the list of "dangers" of elctronics, soldering iron burn is number 1, and cancer is number.... (counting... counting...)


         :-)

      Jong

      P.S.  Pssst, Laura, stay away from MicroWave oven magnetron tubes.    ;-)






















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    • Bryan Pope
      ... You still need a resistor in the circuit because when you turn the pot to 0 there is not longer any resistance to limit the current. Cheers, Bryan
      Message 81 of 81 , Feb 7, 2009
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        Laura wrote:
        > Yes indeed, you CAN dim LEDs with potentiometers!
        >
        > I scrounged up a few old guitar knobs. 250K ohms. Worked great!
        > With a simple mono-color non-blinking LED, it dims the color.
        > I wired it up to my blinker circuit and it slowed the blink rate. And
        > I only fried one LED while doing this experiment. A nite well spent!
        >
        You still need a resistor in the circuit because when you turn the pot
        to "0" there is not longer any resistance to limit the current.

        Cheers,

        Bryan
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