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Impedance Matching Transformers

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  • James P. Rybak <jrybak@mesastate.edu>
    I know that the impedance matching ability of a transformer goes like the square of the turns ratio. However, if I want to have, say, a 25:1 impedance
    Message 1 of 4 , Feb 2, 2003
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      I know that the impedance matching ability of a transformer goes like
      the square of the turns ratio. However, if I want to have, say, a
      25:1 impedance transformation, I could use, in principle, any of the
      following number of turns which have a five-to-one ratio:

      5 and 1
      50 and 10
      500 and 100
      etc. (There are actually an infinite number of combinations)

      How do I know what number of turns to use on the primary and
      secondary sides of my transformer if I'm winding my own transformer?

      Thanks.

      Jim Rybak
    • manifold <manifold_1@yahoo.com>
      This may not be the best page, but it should give you a start. http://members.tripod.com/richard984/transformer_math.htm ... like ... the
      Message 2 of 4 , Feb 3, 2003
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        This may not be the best page, but it should give you a start.
        http://members.tripod.com/richard984/transformer_math.htm

        --- In Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com, "James P. Rybak
        <jrybak@m...>" <jrybak@m...> wrote:
        > I know that the impedance matching ability of a transformer goes
        like
        > the square of the turns ratio. However, if I want to have, say, a
        > 25:1 impedance transformation, I could use, in principle, any of
        the
        > following number of turns which have a five-to-one ratio:
        >
        > 5 and 1
        > 50 and 10
        > 500 and 100
        > etc. (There are actually an infinite number of combinations)
        >
        > How do I know what number of turns to use on the primary and
        > secondary sides of my transformer if I'm winding my own transformer?
        >
        > Thanks.
        >
        > Jim Rybak
      • workaholic_ro <workaholic@clujnapoca.ro>
        I took a look at the site. Lots of maths. Ugh.. I wonder if the general rule practically used for a power supply transformer doesn t work. At 50 Hz the number
        Message 3 of 4 , Feb 6, 2003
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          I took a look at the site. Lots of maths. Ugh.. I wonder if the
          general rule practically used for a power supply transformer doesn't
          work. At 50 Hz the number of turns per volt for an ordinary silicon
          steel core is around 50/S (S-the section is in square cm).
          Probably the number of turns must be increased a little bit for a
          lower frequency.

          Regards,
          work.


          --- In Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com, "manifold <manifold_1@y...>"
          <manifold_1@y...> wrote:
          >
          > This may not be the best page, but it should give you a start.
          > http://members.tripod.com/richard984/transformer_math.htm
          >
          > --- In Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com, "James P. Rybak
          > <jrybak@m...>" <jrybak@m...> wrote:
          > > I know that the impedance matching ability of a transformer goes
          > like
          > > the square of the turns ratio. However, if I want to have, say,
          a
          > > 25:1 impedance transformation, I could use, in principle, any of
          > the
          > > following number of turns which have a five-to-one ratio:
          > >
          > > 5 and 1
          > > 50 and 10
          > > 500 and 100
          > > etc. (There are actually an infinite number of combinations)
          > >
          > > How do I know what number of turns to use on the primary and
          > > secondary sides of my transformer if I'm winding my own
          transformer?
          > >
          > > Thanks.
          > >
          > > Jim Rybak
        • manifold <manifold_1@yahoo.com>
          Math is good. You no like math? Ugh like math. ... doesn t
          Message 4 of 4 , Feb 7, 2003
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            Math is good. You no like math? Ugh like math.

            --- In Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com, "workaholic_ro
            <workaholic@c...>" <workaholic@c...> wrote:
            > I took a look at the site. Lots of maths. Ugh.. I wonder if the
            > general rule practically used for a power supply transformer
            doesn't
            > work. At 50 Hz the number of turns per volt for an ordinary silicon
            > steel core is around 50/S (S-the section is in square cm).
            > Probably the number of turns must be increased a little bit for a
            > lower frequency.
            >
            > Regards,
            > work.
            >
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