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Re: [Electronics_101] OT: Bios 48-bit LBA support versus Windows large hard drive support

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  • Howard Hansen
    *Here is some information on LBA that may be of some help. According to this article it is not the 48 bit LBA that is limiting the size of a partition to
    Message 1 of 11 , Sep 2, 2008
      *Here is some information on LBA that may be of some help. According
      to this article it is not the 48 bit LBA that is limiting the size of a
      partition to 128 Gigabytes but some versions of Windows.
      See http://www.48bitlba.com/ for the full article and help.
      *

      *Howard
      *

      *
      What is 48-bit LBA?*

      *48-bit Logical Block Addressing (LBA)* is a technology which extends
      the capacity of IDE ATA/ATAPI devices beyond a previous limit of 137.4
      GB. This limit applies to IDE ATA/ATAPI devices only and not to SCSI
      interface devices. The original design specification for the ATA
      interface only provided 28-bits with which to address the devices. This
      meant that a hard disk could only have a maximum of 268,435,456 sectors
      of 512 bytes of data thus limiting the ATA interface to a maximum of
      137.4 gigabytes. With 48-bit addressing the limit is 144 petabytes
      (144,000,000 gigabytes).

      *Are there any major issues with 48-bit LBA?*

      Unfortunately, yes. Some versions of Microsoft Windows do not support
      hard drives greater than 137 GB at all, other versions do but it may be
      necessary to update the operating system with the latest Service Pack
      and a parameter may need to be defined and set properly in the Windows
      registry. There's also an issue with the BIOS where it may be necessary
      to install a BIOS upgrade for your system in order for the system to
      work properly with the new hard drive. In many cases the average user
      may find that installing their new large hard drive is not as simple as
      just plugging it in and it just works. If you've reached this site then
      it may be that you've found that to be the case. This site is devoted to
      providing you the help you need for making your new hard drive work with
      your system.

      Dan Nicoson wrote:
      >
      > Since we got some of you computer types out of the woodwork, here's
      > another
      > question:
      >
      > Can I safely use a 250 Gig hard drive as a Slave drive on a computer that
      > only has bios 48-bit LBA support (128 gigs)?
      >
      > I have a Dell Latitude D610 computer with bios 48-bit LBA support (that IS
      > the latest bios upgrade, nothing better available on the Dell web site).
      >
      > Before I realized there was an issue with the bios, I had purchased
      > two 250
      > Gig hard drives, one for internal, the second for my drive bay (swaps out
      > for the CD drive). I used CASPER to move the complete operating system and
      > all installed programs over to the new drive, a very easy upgrade. It
      > worked great for a month and then it wouldn't boot. When I discussed this
      > with CASPER they brought up the fact that my bios was "stuck at 48-bit LBA
      > support".
      >
      > Now when the 250 Gig HD is used as the second hard drive, Windows seems to
      > show everything correctly. Will this second 250 gig drive be a safe way to
      > store 200+ gigs of data? Or, will the bios deficiency catch up with me
      > someday and I find I am missing files?
      >
      > Apparently the 48-bit LBA support limits you to 128 gig hard drives? Funny
      > thing is when I go to the Dell web site to check for upgrades, they
      > offer a
      > 160 Gig hard drive for my exact machine (I entered the Service code).
      >
      > Also, not knowing any of this, 2-3 years ago I bought a cheap
      > E-Machine for
      > my teenage daughter, it came with a 80 gig hard drive and I immediately
      > stuck a 160 gig second drive in there. That 160 gig drive has been my home
      > backup/archive drive all this time. Recently I tried adding the 250 gig
      > drives into that E-Machine. It went through the CASPER process fine but
      > would not boot on those drives, suggesting it has the 48-bit LBA support
      > limitation too.
      >
      > Are these large drives able to safely store data as long as they don't
      > have
      > to boot and run the operating system? (I don't want any data loss)
      >
      > Thanks,
      >
      > Dan Nicoson
      >
      >
    • Dan Nicoson
      OK, let s close this thread. I started it, I ll close it. Steve, I appreciate your tolerance, I started the thread cause I trust this bunch to send me the
      Message 2 of 11 , Sep 3, 2008
        OK, let's close this thread. I started it, I'll close it.

        Steve, I appreciate your tolerance, I started the thread cause I trust this
        bunch to send me the right direction. Several list members have already hit
        me off list to get me going elsewhere.

        Thread closed.

        Thanks everyone,

        Dan Nicoson

        > -----Original Message-----
        > From: Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com
        > [mailto:Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Steve
        > Sent: Tuesday, September 02, 2008 11:33 PM
        > To: Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com
        > Subject: [Electronics_101] Re: OT: Bios 48-bit LBA support versus
        > Windows large hard drive support
        >
        > I don't generally allow general computer questions here because:
        >
        > 1. There are plenty of other lists out there just for the subject, and
        > 2. It can quickly take over the list.
        >
        > And before I get hate mail, extend this out to car questions, IPod
        > questions, etc. and see where we'd be.
        >
        > Steve Greenfield
        >
        > --- In Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com, "Dan Nicoson" <A6intruder@...>
        > wrote:
        > >
        > > Since we got some of you computer types out of the woodwork, here's
        > another
        > > question:
        > >
        > > Can I safely use a 250 Gig hard drive as a Slave drive on a computer
        > that
        > > only has bios 48-bit LBA support (128 gigs)?
        > >
        > > I have a Dell Latitude D610 computer with bios 48-bit LBA support
        > (that IS
        > > the latest bios upgrade, nothing better available on the Dell web
        > site).
        > >
        > > Before I realized there was an issue with the bios, I had purchased
        > two 250
        > > Gig hard drives, one for internal, the second for my drive bay
        > (swaps out
        > > for the CD drive). I used CASPER to move the complete operating
        > system and
        > > all installed programs over to the new drive, a very easy upgrade.
        > It
        > > worked great for a month and then it wouldn't boot. When I
        > discussed this
        > > with CASPER they brought up the fact that my bios was "stuck at
        > 48-bit LBA
        > > support".
        > >
        > > Now when the 250 Gig HD is used as the second hard drive, Windows
        > seems to
        > > show everything correctly. Will this second 250 gig drive be a safe
        > way to
        > > store 200+ gigs of data? Or, will the bios deficiency catch up with
        > me
        > > someday and I find I am missing files?
        > >
        > > Apparently the 48-bit LBA support limits you to 128 gig hard drives?
        > Funny
        > > thing is when I go to the Dell web site to check for upgrades, they
        > offer a
        > > 160 Gig hard drive for my exact machine (I entered the Service code).
        > >
        > > Also, not knowing any of this, 2-3 years ago I bought a cheap
        > E-Machine for
        > > my teenage daughter, it came with a 80 gig hard drive and I
        > immediately
        > > stuck a 160 gig second drive in there. That 160 gig drive has been
        > my home
        > > backup/archive drive all this time. Recently I tried adding the 250
        > gig
        > > drives into that E-Machine. It went through the CASPER process fine
        > but
        > > would not boot on those drives, suggesting it has the 48-bit LBA
        > support
        > > limitation too.
        > >
        > > Are these large drives able to safely store data as long as they
        > don't have
        > > to boot and run the operating system? (I don't want any data loss)
        > >
        > > Thanks,
        > >
        > > Dan Nicoson
        > >
        >
        >
        >
        > ------------------------------------
        >
        > Please trim excess when replyingYahoo! Groups Links
        >
        >
        >
      • Roy J. Tellason
        ... The biggest single issue there is whether the BIOS is used once the machine boots. I have no idea if it is or not for any m$ platform, but for me, with
        Message 3 of 11 , Sep 3, 2008
          On Tuesday 02 September 2008 21:52, Dan Nicoson wrote:
          > Since we got some of you computer types out of the woodwork, here's another
          > question:
          >
          > Can I safely use a 250 Gig hard drive as a Slave drive on a computer that
          > only has bios 48-bit LBA support (128 gigs)?

          The biggest single issue there is whether the BIOS is used once the machine
          boots. I have no idea if it is or not for any m$ platform, but for me,
          with only linux running here, it's not a problem as the BIOS is only used to
          initially boot the machine and not thereafter.

          So if you find yourself with a couple of 250G drives you can't use, feel free
          to send 'em my way. :-)

          --
          Member of the toughest, meanest, deadliest, most unrelenting -- and
          ablest -- form of life in this section of space, a critter that can
          be killed but can't be tamed. --Robert A. Heinlein, "The Puppet Masters"
          -
          Information is more dangerous than cannon to a society ruled by lies. --James
          M Dakin
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