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RE: [Electronics_101] Re: Detecting 240v AC with a micro processor

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  • Paul Smith
    Thanks Mariss, just what I was looking for, I take it if I put the cap in place then the 120hz logic 1 will disappear ? Regards, Paul ... From: Mariss
    Message 1 of 16 , Dec 16, 2002
      Thanks

      Mariss, just what I was looking for, I take it if I put the cap in place
      then the 120hz logic 1 will disappear ?


      Regards,


      Paul


      -----Original Message-----
      From: Mariss Freimanis <mariss92705@...>
      [mailto:mariss92705@...]
      Sent: 15 December 2002 01:42
      To: Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: [Electronics_101] Re: Detecting 240v AC with a micro processor

      Paul,

      Get a dual optoisolator. Connect the LEDs in parallel, cathode to
      anode. Use a 22K 3W resistor in series with the anti-paralleled LEDs.

      Connect the collector to collector, emitter to emitter. Take the
      emitters to your Rabbit ground. Take the collectors to your Rabbit
      port input. Take a 100K resistor from the collectors to your Rabbit
      +5VDC supply.

      If 240VAC is present, there will be a 120Hz signal that is logic "0"
      with narrow pulses going to logic "1" at a 120Hz rate. If you want
      only DC, place a 1uF cap from the collectors to Rabbit ground.

      Hope that helps.

      Mariss

      --- In Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com, "wheelbarrowuk2001
      <wheelbarrowhandle@n...>" <wheelbarrowhandle@n...> wrote:
      > Hello Eveybody,
      >
      > I trying to come up with a simple and cheap, (I need about 20) way
      > of creating a logic 1 (5v) that i can attach to an i/p on a rabbit
      > micro processor, when 240V AC is applied.
      >
      > Any body got an idea.
      >
      > TIA
      >
      >
      > Regards
      >
      >
      > Paul


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    • Paul Smith
      I, I ve got several 18ah sealed lead acid batteries. Can some one remind me what the 18ah means. I know its 18 Amp/Hrs I think, but can remember what it
      Message 2 of 16 , Jan 6, 2003
        I,

        I've got several 18ah sealed lead acid batteries.

        Can some one remind me what the 18ah means. I know its 18
        Amp/Hrs I think, but can remember what it means.


        Thanks


        Regards,

        Paul


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      • peter tremewen
        Hi Paul, I m asuming it means 18 Amp/hours. When they calculate the output capacity of a batery they quote what current it is capable of constantly supplying
        Message 3 of 16 , Jan 6, 2003
          Hi Paul,

          I'm asuming it means 18 Amp/hours. When they calculate the output
          capacity of a batery they quote what current it is capable of constantly
          supplying over ten hours. This batery will supply 1.8 amps for ten hours, or
          18AH. In theory it should be able to supply 18Amps for one hour or 1Amp for
          18 hours also, though in practice it doesn't quite turn out this way. The
          internal resistance and the way the chemical reactions work mean it wont
          quite make 18Amps for one hour. At the same time, supplying one Amp for
          eighteen hours, the internal resistance doesn't effect the current as much
          and the chemical reaction is more efficient. So it will actually last longer
          at one Amp. At least thats the way I understand the practical aspect of it
          all. If anyone can come up with a more technical answer that we can all
          understand, go for it.

          The Sinister Dragon.....

          ----- Original Message -----
          >
          > I've got several 18ah sealed lead acid batteries.
          >
          > Can some one remind me what the 18ah means. I know its 18
          > Amp/Hrs I think, but can remember what it means.
          >
          >
          > Thanks
          >
          >
          > Regards,
          >
          > Paul
          >
        • Miktrain _
          Paul Smith wrote; ... Tony says; Paul the 18ah refers to the power capacity of a charged cell / battery at it s rated voltage before the voltage drops and it
          Message 4 of 16 , Jan 6, 2003



            Paul Smith wrote; 
            > I've got several 18ah sealed lead acid batteries.
            > Can some one remind me what the 18ah means. I know its 18
            >Amp/Hrs I think, but can remember what it means.
            >Thanks
             
            Tony says;
            Paul the 18ah refers to the power capacity of a charged cell / battery at it's rated voltage before the voltage drops and it needs recharging. In your case it means the battery will deliver 1 amp for 18 hours, 18 amps for 1 hour or any combination in between ie 2 amps for 9 hours.
            Tony


            get 2 months FREE*
          • workaholic_ro <workaholic@clujnapoca.ro>
            Just a small correction: 18 Amp*hour instead 18 Amp/hours. I m sure that you already know it but you wrote in a hurry. Best regards, work. ... output ...
            Message 5 of 16 , Jan 20, 2003
              Just a small correction:
              18 Amp*hour instead 18 Amp/hours.
              I'm sure that you already know it but you wrote in a hurry.

              Best regards,
              work.


              > Hi Paul,
              >
              > I'm asuming it means 18 Amp/hours. When they calculate the
              output
              > capacity of a batery they quote what current it is capable of
              constantly
              > supplying over ten hours. This batery will supply 1.8 amps for ten
              hours, or
              > 18AH. In theory it should be able to supply 18Amps for one hour or
              1Amp for
              > 18 hours also, though in practice it doesn't quite turn out this
              way. The
              > internal resistance and the way the chemical reactions work mean it
              wont
              > quite make 18Amps for one hour. At the same time, supplying one Amp
              for
              > eighteen hours, the internal resistance doesn't effect the current
              as much
              > and the chemical reaction is more efficient. So it will actually
              last longer
              > at one Amp. At least thats the way I understand the practical
              aspect of it
              > all. If anyone can come up with a more technical answer that we can
              all
              > understand, go for it.
              >
              > The Sinister Dragon.....
              >
              > ----- Original Message -----
              > >
              > > I've got several 18ah sealed lead acid batteries.
              > >
              > > Can some one remind me what the 18ah means. I know its 18
              > > Amp/Hrs I think, but can remember what it means.
              > >
              > >
              > > Thanks
              > >
              > >
              > > Regards,
              > >
              > > Paul
              > >
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