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Re: Tuning a FM reciever using 8085 microprocessor.

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  • Rahul
    ... perhaps doing it closed-loop with a PLL if the receiver is heterodyned. Implement a frequency counter to ensure that the local oscillator is tuned to the
    Message 1 of 18 , Dec 3, 2007
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      --- In Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com, "jverive" <jverive@...> wrote:
      >
      > You could use a DAC to supply reverse voltage to a tuning diode,
      perhaps doing it closed-loop with a PLL if the receiver is
      heterodyned. Implement a frequency counter to ensure that the local
      oscillator is tuned to the correct frequency (accounting for IF).
      >
      > If you are simply trying to control an external receiver, a stepper
      is okay, but a servo may be better.
      >
      > As others have asked:
      >
      > 1) What are the detailed requirements?
      > 2) If this is homework, when is it due?
      >
      > Jeff
      >
      >
      > --- In Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com, "Rahul"
      <theinsanesinewave@> wrote:
      > >
      > > --- In Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com, "Hugo González
      Monteverde"
      > > <hugonz@> wrote:
      > > >
      > > > Hi Rahul,
      > > >
      > > > You're asking for too much, giving too little.
      > > >
      > > > Questions: what do you want to do? Do you want to move a dial?
      Do
      > > you
      > > > have to implement the whole FM tuner circuitry(implement a
      radio)?
      > > > What is your criterion to determine that the radio is tuned?
      Are you
      > > > already using an FM receiver IC?
      > > >
      > > > Hugo
      > > >
      > > hi hugo!!!
      > > basically i hv to move the dial....do u think it cn be moved
      using
      > > stepper moter? is there any other alternative?
      > >
      > > my main idea is to input a frequency into the 8085 and then
      > > accordingly move the variable capacitor of the tuner(or the dial
      > > which moves the capacitor) to gt the desired frequency.
      > >
      > > Rahul
      > >
      >
      hi Jeff!!

      actually its a project that i v to submit in arnd 2 to 3 mnths. It
      counts in my yearly asssesment.

      Basically i'm new to interfacing peripherals to 8085 so i hvn't gt
      much idea abt the various devices that cn be used for this project. I
      also wantd to ask 1 thing, what is ATC? cn it be used in this project?

      Rahul
    • Leon
      ... From: Rahul To: Sent: Monday, December 03, 2007 1:20 PM Subject: [Electronics_101] Re:
      Message 2 of 18 , Dec 3, 2007
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        ----- Original Message -----
        From: "Rahul" <theinsanesinewave@...>
        To: <Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Monday, December 03, 2007 1:20 PM
        Subject: [Electronics_101] Re: Tuning a FM reciever using 8085
        microprocessor.

        actually its a project that i v to submit in arnd 2 to 3 mnths. It
        counts in my yearly asssesment.

        Basically i'm new to interfacing peripherals to 8085 so i hvn't gt
        much idea abt the various devices that cn be used for this project. I
        also wantd to ask 1 thing, what is ATC? cn it be used in this project?

        Why are you using an 8085? It's been obsolete for many years. You'd be much
        better off using a modern chip with plenty of peripherals built-in.

        Leon
        --
        Leon Heller
        Amateur radio call-sign G1HSM
        Yaesu FT-817ND and FT-857D transceivers
        Suzuki SV1000S motorcycle
        leon355@...
        http://www.geocities.com/leon_heller
      • Rahul
        ... I ... project? ... be much ... hi Leon!!! Yeah, my course is quite prehistoric ;) I hv to use 8085 in this project.....sumhow!!! Rahul
        Message 3 of 18 , Dec 3, 2007
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          --- In Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com, "Leon" <leon355@...> wrote:
          >
          > ----- Original Message -----
          > From: "Rahul" <theinsanesinewave@...>
          > To: <Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com>
          > Sent: Monday, December 03, 2007 1:20 PM
          > Subject: [Electronics_101] Re: Tuning a FM reciever using 8085
          > microprocessor.
          >
          > actually its a project that i v to submit in arnd 2 to 3 mnths. It
          > counts in my yearly asssesment.
          >
          > Basically i'm new to interfacing peripherals to 8085 so i hvn't gt
          > much idea abt the various devices that cn be used for this project.
          I
          > also wantd to ask 1 thing, what is ATC? cn it be used in this
          project?
          >
          > Why are you using an 8085? It's been obsolete for many years. You'd
          be much
          > better off using a modern chip with plenty of peripherals built-in.
          >
          > Leon
          > --
          > Leon Heller
          > Amateur radio call-sign G1HSM
          > Yaesu FT-817ND and FT-857D transceivers
          > Suzuki SV1000S motorcycle
          > leon355@...
          > http://www.geocities.com/leon_heller
          >
          hi Leon!!!

          Yeah, my course is quite prehistoric ;)
          I hv to use 8085 in this project.....sumhow!!!

          Rahul
        • jverive
          The 8085 might be prehistoric , but address decoding and data manipulation techniques haven t really changed much since the dinosaurs roamed the earth (I
          Message 4 of 18 , Dec 3, 2007
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            The 8085 might be "prehistoric", but address decoding and data manipulation techniques haven't really changed much since the dinosaurs roamed the earth (I know, because I am one of those dinosaurs!)

            The project is a typical assignment for Electrical Engineering programs, since it requires knowledge of basic hardware and software concepts. It's not too difficult if you break it down into appropriate pieces:

            The first thing to realize is that you are going to be building a special purpose computer. You will need memory for storing instructions and data, and you will need hardware for obtaining user input (frequency), as well as hardware for driving the stepper motor. First decide on the over-all structure of this simple computer, and then worry about the specific program flow.

            That's all for now. If you can sketch a basic block diagram or schematic for the basic computer hardware design, I'd be willing to provide further assistance. Got questions about the computer design? Start asking now.

            Jeff

            --- In Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com, "Rahul" <theinsanesinewave@...> wrote:
            >
            > --- In Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com, "Leon" <leon355@> wrote:
            > >
            > > ----- Original Message -----
            > > From: "Rahul" <theinsanesinewave@>
            > > To: <Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com>
            > > Sent: Monday, December 03, 2007 1:20 PM
            > > Subject: [Electronics_101] Re: Tuning a FM reciever using 8085
            > > microprocessor.
            > >
            > > actually its a project that i v to submit in arnd 2 to 3 mnths. It
            > > counts in my yearly asssesment.
            > >
            > > Basically i'm new to interfacing peripherals to 8085 so i hvn't gt
            > > much idea abt the various devices that cn be used for this project.
            > I
            > > also wantd to ask 1 thing, what is ATC? cn it be used in this
            > project?
            > >
            > > Why are you using an 8085? It's been obsolete for many years. You'd
            > be much
            > > better off using a modern chip with plenty of peripherals built-in.
            > >
            > > Leon
            > > --
            > > Leon Heller
            > > Amateur radio call-sign G1HSM
            > > Yaesu FT-817ND and FT-857D transceivers
            > > Suzuki SV1000S motorcycle
            > > leon355@
            > > http://www.geocities.com/leon_heller
            > >
            > hi Leon!!!
            >
            > Yeah, my course is quite prehistoric ;)
            > I hv to use 8085 in this project.....sumhow!!!
            >
            > Rahul
            >
          • rtstofer
            There s a document here that shows (on sheet 10) how to build up a simple 8085 using the CPU, an 8 bit address latch, standard memories and standard IO
            Message 5 of 18 , Dec 3, 2007
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              There's a document here that shows (on sheet 10) how to build up a
              simple 8085 using the CPU, an 8 bit address latch, standard memories
              and standard IO devices. See
              http://www.jameco.com/Jameco/Products/ProdDS/52062ITL.pdf

              Part of the memory will be EEPROM or flash and the rest can be RAM.
              If you aren't going to implement a full operating system, consider
              32kB of flash or EEPROM at 0x0000 and 32k of RAM at 0x8000.

              Unless your class already provides a system. In this case all you
              need to do is write code and implement the output lines to drive a
              stepper. But, the problem with steppers is knowing where 'zero' is
              located. You will need some kind of encode to indicate where the
              stepper is currently located. Of you can do what they do on floppy
              drives: step in one direction until you trip and end-point detector.
              Then work back from there.

              What resources do you have?

              There are MANY 8085 assemblers around that can create the hex codes
              for the EEPROM or flash. Your problem will be getting the code into
              the EEPROM.

              In the old days, we implemented a 'monitor' in about 1k of EEPROM and
              then used that to read hex files into RAM. Google '8085 assembler'
              and '8085 monitor'. The good part is that when the monitor works,
              subsequent programming doesn't include reprogramming the EEPROM!

              A neat way to do the programming might be to use Palo Alto Tiny Basic
              in EEPROM and write the rest of the code in Basic. See
              http://www.nicholson.com/rhn/files/tinybasic.tar.Z Rename this to
              tinybaseic.tar.gz before trying to open.

              But, I was serious when I posted to the wrong thread that it would be
              more fun to just bring up CP/M 2.2 from a Compact Flash (use an 8155
              to interface). Two or three months might be a little short if you
              have to start from scratch.

              Richard
            • jverive
              Rahul, In order to decided where you might need the most help, it would be useful to know where you are in your degree program. For example, are you in the
              Message 6 of 18 , Dec 3, 2007
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                Rahul,

                In order to decided where you might need the most help, it would be useful to know where you are in your degree program. For example, are you in the third year of a four-year BSEE degree, the second year of a post-graduate MSEE program, etc.; also, can you describe the EE (or CS) courses you've taken already? I don't want to insult you by "explaining" things that are obvious to you, but I also don't want to skip something that might be important!

                Jeff

                --- In Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com, "Rahul" <theinsanesinewave@...> wrote:
                >
                > --- In Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com, "Leon" <leon355@> wrote:
                > >
                > > ----- Original Message -----
                > > From: "Rahul" <theinsanesinewave@>
                > > To: <Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com>
                > > Sent: Monday, December 03, 2007 1:20 PM
                > > Subject: [Electronics_101] Re: Tuning a FM reciever using 8085
                > > microprocessor.
                > >
                > > actually its a project that i v to submit in arnd 2 to 3 mnths. It
                > > counts in my yearly asssesment.
                > >
                > > Basically i'm new to interfacing peripherals to 8085 so i hvn't gt
                > > much idea abt the various devices that cn be used for this project.
                > I
                > > also wantd to ask 1 thing, what is ATC? cn it be used in this
                > project?
                > >
                > > Why are you using an 8085? It's been obsolete for many years. You'd
                > be much
                > > better off using a modern chip with plenty of peripherals built-in.
                > >
                > > Leon
                > > --
                > > Leon Heller
                > > Amateur radio call-sign G1HSM
                > > Yaesu FT-817ND and FT-857D transceivers
                > > Suzuki SV1000S motorcycle
                > > leon355@
                > > http://www.geocities.com/leon_heller
                > >
                > hi Leon!!!
                >
                > Yeah, my course is quite prehistoric ;)
                > I hv to use 8085 in this project.....sumhow!!!
                >
                > Rahul
                >
              • Roy J. Tellason
                ... Neat! How much of an EPROM does this need once assembled? (I don t have any cross-assembly tools handy on this linux box... :-) -- Member of the
                Message 7 of 18 , Dec 5, 2007
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                  On Monday 03 December 2007 20:01, rtstofer wrote:
                  > A neat way to do the programming might be to use Palo Alto Tiny Basic
                  > in EEPROM and write the rest of the code in Basic. See
                  > http://www.nicholson.com/rhn/files/tinybasic.tar.Z Rename this to
                  > tinybaseic.tar.gz before trying to open.

                  Neat! How much of an EPROM does this need once assembled? (I don't have any
                  cross-assembly tools handy on this linux box... :-)

                  --
                  Member of the toughest, meanest, deadliest, most unrelenting -- and
                  ablest -- form of life in this section of space,  a critter that can
                  be killed but can't be tamed.  --Robert A. Heinlein, "The Puppet Masters"
                  -
                  Information is more dangerous than cannon to a society ruled by lies. --James
                  M Dakin
                • rtstofer
                  ... have any ... It used to be 1k (it s been a long time {30 yrs}, maybe it was 2k) but I think it is bloated since someone added the interface for CP/M files.
                  Message 8 of 18 , Dec 5, 2007
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                    --- In Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com, "Roy J. Tellason"
                    <rtellason@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > On Monday 03 December 2007 20:01, rtstofer wrote:
                    > > A neat way to do the programming might be to use Palo Alto Tiny Basic
                    > > in EEPROM and write the rest of the code in Basic. See
                    > > http://www.nicholson.com/rhn/files/tinybasic.tar.Z Rename this to
                    > > tinybaseic.tar.gz before trying to open.
                    >
                    > Neat! How much of an EPROM does this need once assembled? (I don't
                    have any
                    > cross-assembly tools handy on this linux box... :-)

                    It used to be 1k (it's been a long time {30 yrs}, maybe it was 2k) but
                    I think it is bloated since someone added the interface for CP/M
                    files. They also moved the origin to 0x100 and changed the way the
                    reset vectors are initialized. What was wrong with paper tape or
                    audio cassette? Heck, I wrote the BIOS for CP/M on my Altair 8800
                    using a paper tape assembler converted to an audio tape (back in '76).

                    Anyway, it is org'd at 0x100 and runs through 0xAB6 so about 2744
                    bytes of EEPROM. Four K would handle it easily. My guess is that,
                    with a little work, it could be put back to 2k.

                    In fact, the way it was reorg'd implies that is now a CP/M program
                    running out of RAM because there is code to initialize the reset
                    vectors and that wouldn't work in a EEPROM only version.

                    There are comments re: how it used to work so restoring it to its'
                    former glory wouldn't be all that hard. I did a couple of design
                    projects where I used Palo Alto Tiny Basic to debug the hardware.

                    I was thinking about revisiting this code. It wouldn't take much to
                    build an 8085 single board computer. Maybe with a switch so it could
                    run P.A.T.B. out of EEPROM or boot CP/M off a couple of Compact Flash
                    drives.

                    I did an FPGA emulation of a Z80 with CP/M a couple of years ago and
                    it was fun to visit with old friends - MAC, RMAC, PL/I, BDS-C,
                    WordStar and all that stuff!

                    But, why mess with an 8085 when Zilog has a Z80 running at 50 MHz. I
                    saw one at a computer fair where this fellow built a new processor
                    board for the Altair 8800 (selling for just $1400!) and stuffed a VIA
                    motherboard in the case to provide networking. Now he can run CP/M
                    over the Internet!

                    CP/M at 50 MHz is blistering fast!

                    Richard
                  • Roy J. Tellason
                    ... Not something I m likely to want in there... ... I never got that far into hacking that stuff, though I know of a bunch of it (and still have a BigBoard
                    Message 9 of 18 , Dec 5, 2007
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                      On Wednesday 05 December 2007 20:31, rtstofer wrote:
                      > --- In Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com, "Roy J. Tellason"
                      > <rtellason@...> wrote:
                      > > On Monday 03 December 2007 20:01, rtstofer wrote:
                      > > > A neat way to do the programming might be to use Palo Alto Tiny Basic
                      > > > in EEPROM and write the rest of the code in Basic. See
                      > > > http://www.nicholson.com/rhn/files/tinybasic.tar.Z Rename this to
                      > > > tinybaseic.tar.gz before trying to open.
                      > >
                      > > Neat! How much of an EPROM does this need once assembled? (I don't
                      > > have any cross-assembly tools handy on this linux box... :-)
                      >
                      > It used to be 1k (it's been a long time {30 yrs}, maybe it was 2k) but
                      > I think it is bloated since someone added the interface for CP/M
                      > files.

                      Not something I'm likely to want in there...

                      > They also moved the origin to 0x100 and changed the way the reset vectors
                      > are initialized. What was wrong with paper tape or audio cassette? Heck, I
                      > wrote the BIOS for CP/M on my Altair 8800 using a paper tape assembler
                      > converted to an audio tape (back in '76).

                      I never got that far into hacking that stuff, though I know of a bunch of it
                      (and still have a BigBoard II that needs a BIOS...)

                      > Anyway, it is org'd at 0x100 and runs through 0xAB6 so about 2744
                      > bytes of EEPROM. Four K would handle it easily. My guess is that,
                      > with a little work, it could be put back to 2k.

                      Got plenty of 2716s, and 2732s, if I need 'em.

                      > In fact, the way it was reorg'd implies that is now a CP/M program
                      > running out of RAM because there is code to initialize the reset
                      > vectors and that wouldn't work in a EEPROM only version.

                      I didn't take that much of a look at it, just a quick peek at the doc file
                      and a bit less than that at the source.

                      > There are comments re: how it used to work so restoring it to its'
                      > former glory wouldn't be all that hard. I did a couple of design
                      > projects where I used Palo Alto Tiny Basic to debug the hardware.

                      I can see where that would be handy, too. Though I might want the option of
                      having unsigned integers and maybe hex representation in there instead of
                      signed ints only.

                      > I was thinking about revisiting this code. It wouldn't take much to
                      > build an 8085 single board computer. Maybe with a switch so it could
                      > run P.A.T.B. out of EEPROM or boot CP/M off a couple of Compact Flash
                      > drives.

                      I have some of those around somewhere, but I have a fair number more z80
                      parts, I think.

                      > I did an FPGA emulation of a Z80 with CP/M a couple of years ago and
                      > it was fun to visit with old friends - MAC, RMAC, PL/I, BDS-C,
                      > WordStar and all that stuff!

                      Emulation? Dunno why you'd do that when there's still plenty of the old
                      hardware around, or at least around here. :-)

                      > But, why mess with an 8085 when Zilog has a Z80 running at 50 MHz. I
                      > saw one at a computer fair where this fellow built a new processor
                      > board for the Altair 8800 (selling for just $1400!) and stuffed a VIA
                      > motherboard in the case to provide networking. Now he can run CP/M
                      > over the Internet!

                      Heh. Some people are really into doing some crazy things with that old
                      hardware. I could see networking my Imsai -- by way of SLIP, PLIP, or
                      similar.

                      > CP/M at 50 MHz is blistering fast!

                      I'll bet it would be! Heck, I had mine optimized all to hell, when I was
                      still using my Osborne Executive as my primary machine. Applied about every
                      patch I could to WS, fetched stuff from a "command.lbr" (about 600K!), all
                      sorts of stuff like that. I remember when I'd heard that they came out with
                      a 20 MHz part and thought that would be a real screamer...

                      I've been having some idle thoughts lately about building some z80 boards. Or
                      maybe 8085 too, if I run across those, and maybe some of the other 8-bit
                      parts I have on hand here. Just some basic code, maybe a few monitor
                      routines and enough for the CPU to figure out what it has to deal with in
                      terms of RAM, and transfer info into and out of that board. See what could
                      be done with a bunch of those around, just for fun.

                      --
                      Member of the toughest, meanest, deadliest, most unrelenting -- and
                      ablest -- form of life in this section of space,  a critter that can
                      be killed but can't be tamed.  --Robert A. Heinlein, "The Puppet Masters"
                      -
                      Information is more dangerous than cannon to a society ruled by lies. --James
                      M Dakin
                    • rtstofer
                      ... old ... The CPU core was written by someone far more advanced. It started after I saw a project where someone implemented PacMan which was originally done
                      Message 10 of 18 , Dec 5, 2007
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                        > > I did an FPGA emulation of a Z80 with CP/M a couple of years ago and
                        > > it was fun to visit with old friends - MAC, RMAC, PL/I, BDS-C,
                        > > WordStar and all that stuff!
                        >
                        > Emulation? Dunno why you'd do that when there's still plenty of the
                        old
                        > hardware around, or at least around here. :-)

                        The CPU core was written by someone far more advanced. It started
                        after I saw a project where someone implemented PacMan which was
                        originally done on a Z80.

                        Along the way I built a MAME cabinet instead so I just went ahead and
                        used the Z80 core plus a few peripherals to implement CP/M. I learned
                        a lot about FPGAs with that project.

                        Then I moved backwards about 10 years and built an emulation of the
                        IBM1130 (circa 1965) from scratch. I demo'd that at a computer fair
                        last month to a group of 1130 enthusiasts.

                        I am sort of working on emulating a PDP-11/40. That may take a while...

                        Richard
                      • Leon
                        ... From: Roy J. Tellason To: Sent: Thursday, December 06, 2007 12:15 AM Subject: Re:
                        Message 11 of 18 , Dec 5, 2007
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                          ----- Original Message -----
                          From: "Roy J. Tellason" <rtellason@...>
                          To: <Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com>
                          Sent: Thursday, December 06, 2007 12:15 AM
                          Subject: Re: [Electronics_101] Re: But its my course.....


                          On Monday 03 December 2007 20:01, rtstofer wrote:
                          > A neat way to do the programming might be to use Palo Alto Tiny Basic
                          > in EEPROM and write the rest of the code in Basic. See
                          > http://www.nicholson.com/rhn/files/tinybasic.tar.Z Rename this to
                          > tinybaseic.tar.gz before trying to open.

                          Neat! How much of an EPROM does this need once assembled? (I don't have
                          any
                          cross-assembly tools handy on this linux box... :-)


                          I think it fitted into a 2k EPROM when it was assembled for an 8080.

                          Leon
                          --
                          Leon Heller
                          Amateur radio call-sign G1HSM
                          Yaesu FT-817ND and FT-857D transceivers
                          Suzuki SV1000S motorcycle
                          leon355@...
                          http://www.geocities.com/leon_heller
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