Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: Vacuum Desoldering Iron (sub) Project

Expand Messages
  • Bob Hyland
    ... *snip* ... Ok. I see the unit. Do you hook this thing up to a vacuum pump? Is the solder trap integrated, or do you need to provide that yourself? In other
    Message 1 of 24 , Jul 29, 2007
    • 0 Attachment
      --- "Stefan Trethan" <stefan_trethan@...> wrote:
      *snip*
      > > By the way, has anyone had any luck with this unit or similar?
      > > Stefan: Which "$14 desoldering gun" did you find? And where?
      > > Bob H.
      >
      > Look at ebay 150113816518. It is similar to hakko/aoyue. I believe the
      > heaters and tips may be identical. It is 14eur quality, don't expect
      > too much.
      >
      > ST

      Ok. I see the unit. Do you hook this thing up to a vacuum pump? Is the
      solder trap integrated, or do you need to provide that yourself?

      In other words, is this just a heating element with a hollow tube and a
      bit of hose coming out the back? Or is there more than meets the eye?

      Thanks!

      Bob H.
    • Roy J. Tellason
      ... I use a 45W (!) heating element and a 1/8 chisel tip that allows me to heat multiple pins, either several at once, or one after another, to soldering
      Message 2 of 24 , Jul 29, 2007
      • 0 Attachment
        On Sunday 29 July 2007 01:47, Bob Hyland wrote:
        > Hi all:
        >
        > I have been emailing some members off-line about a little subproject
        > I have been working on: a vacuum desoldering iron. It is a subproject
        > because it really came up as part of something bigger I am working on.
        >
        > Basically, I have a lot of extra parts and connectors that are
        > soldered to existing PCB's that are not usable anymore. For instance,
        > I have a number of very old motherboards that have great DB-25
        > connectors, battery holders, RJ-11 sockets, etc. that I could really
        > use for a couple of projects. So, I need a way to desolder a bunch of
        > things at once. NOTE: I am not THAT concerned if I melt the rest of
        > the board away. Most of the stuff I am after is rather hardy.

        I use a 45W (!) heating element and a 1/8" chisel tip that allows me to heat
        multiple pins, either several at once, or one after another, to soldering
        temperature. People have used torches, too, though that's a whole lot
        easier to set the board on fire. If you want to try that outdoors is
        probably a good idea. :-)

        > I did have an idea to use a heat gun I have (kind-of like a hair
        > dryer with attachments). However, no one really gave me the
        > impression that this approach would work. Anybody ever try this? I
        > think this is fairly similar to the unit I have:
        > http://www.homier.com/detail.asp?sku=02482

        Might work, I've heard of people doing that -- heat the board up good, and
        whack it once, watch the parts just fall out. Use a metal cookie sheet or
        similar to catch them and any droplets of molten solder though.

        > So, thinking this is not an option, I looked around and "low &
        > behold" I had a RadioShack desoldering iron on hand:
        > <http://rsk.imageg.net/graphics/product_images/pRS1C-2160644w345.jpg>

        Not following links here, is that the one with the rubber bulb? I've always
        been fairly dubious about how effective that might be.

        > So, with these basics out of the way, here is the plan:
        >
        > (1) Connect the soldering station with attached "business end" to a
        > fuel filter, which i picked up for $3:
        > <http://www.partsamerica.com/product_images/aap/pur/f10131_ang.jpg>
        >
        > {On second thought, I should have used one with a see through
        > container with a replaceable filter material.

        Indeed. The one I use has a glass bowl, and is situated right next to the
        pump. Most of the material (the bigger chunks) stays in the hose, though.

        > Here is one available
        > for $7:
        > <http://chaparral-
        > racing.com/Chaparral/assets/product_images/3603516b.jpg>
        >
        > When I replace the filter, I will probably replace it with a glass
        > filter.}
        >
        > The short tube shown on the top will attached to the tube (Pipe) and
        > the end on the right.
        >
        > (2) The part with the screw end will connect to a fitting on a
        > Silicon hose.
        >
        > (3) That hose will have another connector to hook onto a 4 inch
        > (inner diameter, with 1/4" walls) PVC pipe that is about 10 inches
        > long. The pipe will have 2 heavy duty caps on either end.

        What's that for?

        > * HELP NEEDED HERE * I will need a valve right here that can be
        > electrically controlled. I want to connect a foot pedal switch to
        > open the valve (closed when button is not pressed). * ANY IDEAS? *
        >
        > Closest thing I found was this:
        > http://www.grainger.com/Grainger/items/6JJ52
        >
        > But, that is with a 1/8" NPT port. I don't know if that will work.
        > Also, it is almost $30...

        That's too small.

        I'd wanted to build a vacuum desoldering setup for quite some time, and then
        when a friend of mine stopped by with a distributor machine to play with a
        bit, I noticed that it had a vacuum pump in it, and said something about
        it to him. He offered me a "dual diaphragm" pump for something like $20,
        and I took him up on the offer. This had inlet and outlet ports on each side
        that were that size thread.

        First thing I tried was going out and getting a bunch of fittings to tie both
        halves together, and used a hunk of steel brake line (available at your
        local auto parts store) and vacuum line (as found in lots of older cars,
        rubber hose typically 1/8" ID) and I found it *very* unsatisfactory in terms
        of flow.

        So I went back to stores, got another bunch of fittings, and used some 1/2"
        copper pipe that I had a bit of laying around. From the "T" connecting both
        sides I used a hunk of clear tubing that's maybe 5/8" inside diameter, needs
        a hose clamp on the barb to keep it in place but I couldn't get a barb that
        would screw in to the filter that would also fit the hose and didn't want to
        go with a smaller size of hose, so...

        The business end of it has a couple more bits of brass fitting, one of them
        jams into the end of the hose, and has threads in it to screw the other bit
        into, which clamps down on a bit of teflon tubing. That was (initially) a
        bit of salvage from one of those one-shot solder sucker tools, I just took
        an extra tip and chomped off the blue plastic around it with cutting pliers
        and took what was left and clamped it in there.

        Works real well, overall. I use a 1/8" screwdriver to push the stuff out of
        the tip that accumulates there from time to time, or it'll end up clogging.
        The air flow and changes in pressure (venturi effect) cause that, I guess.

        > (4) In the middle of the pipe, I will insert a 20 PSI safety valve
        > that converts to be used for vacuum applications. The safe operating
        > pressure for 4 inch, schedule 40 PVC is 133 psi, with a minimum burst
        > pressure of 710 psi. So, 20 PSI keeps things nice & safe. Here's one
        > from Grainger:
        > http://www.grainger.com/Grainger/items/5Z763

        For what? I wouldn't bother with this.

        > (5) The other end of the pipe will have a fixture that connects to a
        > standard air hose commonly used for compressors:
        > http://germes-online.com/direct/dbimage/50243197/Air_Compressor.jpg

        That's getting a little elaborate too, and for what?

        > Just before the fitting, I will add a paper filter, then a charcoal
        > filter to keep dirt from going all the way to the compressor.

        Overkill, and more money than you really need to spend on stuff.

        > I have an old, small, well used, 1/3 HP compressor that I will put on
        > this end.

        Will that work well cutting it on and off a bunch?

        > I may eventually want to add a valve on the end of the hose next to
        > the pipe fitting (something like this):
        > <http://indiamart.com/metrovalves/pcat-gifs/products-small/ball-
        > valves.jpg>
        >
        > The purpose is to run the compressor (hooked up to the suction end,
        > of course) until a bit of suction is built up in the tube. Then I
        > turn off the valve (and the compressor) so the compressor does not
        > keep building pressure and the pipe stays "empty". But, I need
        > something inexpensive for this. Still looking.

        On controlling the setup I have, I took the box from an old effects pedal,
        put a push-button switch in there, and wired it up with a power cord and
        another cord with a power socket on the end of it. Worked pretty well until
        I burned the switch up. :-) I think that I'm probably going to replace that
        button switch and stick a triac in there, maybe even go with a circuit I
        have that allows for toggling on-off in the process.

        > Ok, then I will put a

        What? Can't hear ya! :-)

        > So, all told, I would have to buy:
        > * 2 caps for the pipe - $6 each - (~$12)
        > * Silicon hose - ? any ideas on some suitable hose? ?~$10 ** HELP
        > NEEDED HERE **

        That clear stuff you buy at Lowe's/Home Depot works well for me. Except that
        I need to get another hunk of it, as it's currently way less than clear,
        having been in use now for something around 20 years and getting quite
        yellowed, to the point where I can't see the solder chunks building up in
        there.

        > * 2 Connectors for the silicon hose - ?$2 each (~$4)
        > * The connector for the silicon hose to the PVC cap (Male to Male
        > adapter). ~$3
        > * The connector for the compressor hose to the PVC cap (Male to Male
        > adapter). ~$3
        > * The vacuum safety valve - $10
        > * Solenoid valve for the pipe to hose. - ?$30!
        > * ? Anything else ?
        >
        >
        > ------------------------------
        >
        > Ok, that is Plan A. If it starts looking too complex, I go to Plan B.
        >
        > PLAN B:
        >
        > Perhaps I start looking at buying a unit like this:
        > http://www.circuitspecialists.com/prod.itml/icOid/8013
        >
        > or I get a better workstation with a vacuum pump like this:
        > http://www.circuitspecialists.com/prod.itml/icOid/7789
        >
        >
        > ** ANY IDEAS ON BETTER "BUY" OPTIONS? **

        I use the above setup, and braid, and also a one-shot pump deal
        (Soldapulliit) depending on what I'm working on, different stuff works well
        for different situations.

        There's also a thread on this stuff over in the yahoo Tekscopes group,
        interestingly enough.

        --
        Member of the toughest, meanest, deadliest, most unrelenting -- and
        ablest -- form of life in this section of space,  a critter that can
        be killed but can't be tamed.  --Robert A. Heinlein, "The Puppet Masters"
        -
        Information is more dangerous than cannon to a society ruled by lies. --James
        M Dakin
      • Roy J. Tellason
        ... This is why I use a 45W element, rather than the usually recommended 15-25W sizes. :-) ... Lots of heat and moving quickly is the key here. ... I ll
        Message 3 of 24 , Jul 29, 2007
        • 0 Attachment
          On Sunday 29 July 2007 13:34, James M.(Jim) Geidl wrote:
          > I bought a micro butane torch for my wife to use on some jewelry she is
          > making. I got to looking at it and thought it might be great for removing
          > larger components, like heat sinks, that have been soldered on boards. If
          > I use my iron, by the time I get one leg unsoldered the other one has cool.

          This is why I use a 45W element, rather than the usually recommended 15-25W
          sizes. :-)

          > It worked GREAT. I also started taking off stuff like multi-contact
          > connectors (like your DB-9's) then moved on to just about everything else.
          > I think it actually heats the components less than an iron because I can
          > heat all the pins at one time very quickly.

          Lots of heat and moving quickly is the key here.

          > I have never been so success in removing components. I can heat a whole set
          > of connections in a split second. I can now salvage parts that I have never
          > had much success with in the past. I love it.

          I'll re-state my experience with using a propane torch, though -- it's *real*
          easy to set the board on fire, and best to do that trick outdoors if at all
          possible.

          --
          Member of the toughest, meanest, deadliest, most unrelenting -- and
          ablest -- form of life in this section of space,  a critter that can
          be killed but can't be tamed.  --Robert A. Heinlein, "The Puppet Masters"
          -
          Information is more dangerous than cannon to a society ruled by lies. --James
          M Dakin
        • Stefan Trethan
          ... The collector is on top of the gun , all integrated you just need a pump and a station to power it. This seems extremely similar:
          Message 4 of 24 , Jul 29, 2007
          • 0 Attachment
            On 7/29/07, Bob Hyland <Electronics@...> wrote:

            >
            > Ok. I see the unit. Do you hook this thing up to a vacuum pump? Is the
            > solder trap integrated, or do you need to provide that yourself?
            >
            > In other words, is this just a heating element with a hollow tube and a
            > bit of hose coming out the back? Or is there more than meets the eye?
            >
            > Thanks!
            >
            > Bob H.

            The collector is on top of the "gun", all integrated you just need a
            pump and a station to power it.
            This seems extremely similar: <http://www.madelltech.com/images/madell201A.jpg>

            There is currently an identical discussion going on at
            tekscopes@yahoogroups, should you not be a member there.

            ST
          • rtstofer
            Those little Weller desoldering irons with the rubber bulb do work pretty well on through-hole components. In my opinion, Solder Wick works as well, probably
            Message 5 of 24 , Jul 29, 2007
            • 0 Attachment
              Those little Weller desoldering irons with the rubber bulb do work
              pretty well on through-hole components. In my opinion, Solder Wick
              works as well, probably better.

              As to removing components with a heat gun, one way to do it is to use
              a eutectic additive melted into the solder such as Chip Quik. See
              http://chipquik.com Basically, this will change the melting point of
              the solder to about 150 degrees C. You will be able reach this easily
              with a heat gun, probably from the back side.

              Richard
            • Brian
              I had some surface mount connectors on a board I needed to get off without destroying them. I used a hot air gun set for 650 degrees F and heated the bottom of
              Message 6 of 24 , Jul 30, 2007
              • 0 Attachment
                I had some surface mount connectors on a board I needed to get off
                without destroying them. I used a hot air gun set for 650 degrees F
                and heated the bottom of the board for about 5 minutes and they came
                right off with no damage to the part or board, acted like a reflow
                oven. I also got a thru-hole connector out easily also. I did not
                need the old board but it was not damaged during the process. you
                could also get one of the ovens for bagels and heat the board up,
                reach in and pull off what you need. hopefully the oven is big
                enough to hold the board.

                Brian

                --- In Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com, "Bob Hyland"
                <Electronics@...> wrote:
                >
                > Hi all:
                >
                > I have been emailing some members off-line about a little
                subproject
                > I have been working on: a vacuum desoldering iron. It is a
                subproject
                > because it really came up as part of something bigger I am working
                on.
                >
                > Basically, I have a lot of extra parts and connectors that are
                > soldered to existing PCB's that are not usable anymore. For
                instance,
                > I have a number of very old motherboards that have great DB-25
                > connectors, battery holders, RJ-11 sockets, etc. that I could
                really
                > use for a couple of projects. So, I need a way to desolder a bunch
                of
                > things at once. NOTE: I am not THAT concerned if I melt the rest
                of
                > the board away. Most of the stuff I am after is rather hardy.
                >
                > I did have an idea to use a heat gun I have (kind-of like a hair
                > dryer with attachments). However, no one really gave me the
                > impression that this approach would work. Anybody ever try this? I
                > think this is fairly similar to the unit I have:
                > http://www.homier.com/detail.asp?sku=02482
                >
                > ---------------------
                >
                > So, thinking this is not an option, I looked around and "low &
                > behold" I had a RadioShack desoldering iron on hand:
                > <http://rsk.imageg.net/graphics/product_images/pRS1C-
                2160644w345.jpg>
                >
                > I took this apart as such:
                > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Electronics_101/files/Bob/apart.jpg
                >
                > The business end is here:
                > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Electronics_101/files/Bob/full.jpg
                >
                > For ease of discussion, I call the part along the bottom the pipe.
                It
                > is hollow, and air is pulled through there. I call the part along
                the
                > upper part of the picture the "stock". That goes into the heating
                > unit to heat the thing and melt the solder.
                >
                > To make the whole thing more useful, I took the business end and
                > plugged it into my RS Soldering Station, which some family member
                > donated for my Birthday a few years ago:
                > http://www.radioshack.com/product/index.jsp?productId=2062751
                >
                >
                > So, with these basics out of the way, here is the plan:
                >
                > (1) Connect the soldering station with attached "business end" to
                a
                > fuel filter, which i picked up for $3:
                > <http://www.partsamerica.com/product_images/aap/pur/f10131_ang.jpg>
                >
                > {On second thought, I should have used one with a see through
                > container with a replaceable filter material. Here is one
                available
                > for $7:
                > <http://chaparral-
                > racing.com/Chaparral/assets/product_images/3603516b.jpg>
                >
                > When I replace the filter, I will probably replace it with a glass
                > filter.}
                >
                > The short tube shown on the top will attached to the tube (Pipe)
                and
                > the end on the right.
                >
                > (2) The part with the screw end will connect to a fitting on a
                > Silicon hose.
                >
                > (3) That hose will have another connector to hook onto a 4 inch
                > (inner diameter, with 1/4" walls) PVC pipe that is about 10 inches
                > long. The pipe will have 2 heavy duty caps on either end.
                >
                > * HELP NEEDED HERE * I will need a valve right here that can be
                > electrically controlled. I want to connect a foot pedal switch to
                > open the valve (closed when button is not pressed). * ANY IDEAS? *
                >
                > Closest thing I found was this:
                > http://www.grainger.com/Grainger/items/6JJ52
                >
                > But, that is with a 1/8" NPT port. I don't know if that will work.
                > Also, it is almost $30...
                >
                > (4) In the middle of the pipe, I will insert a 20 PSI safety valve
                > that converts to be used for vacuum applications. The safe
                operating
                > pressure for 4 inch, schedule 40 PVC is 133 psi, with a minimum
                burst
                > pressure of 710 psi. So, 20 PSI keeps things nice & safe. Here's
                one
                > from Grainger:
                > http://www.grainger.com/Grainger/items/5Z763
                >
                > (5) The other end of the pipe will have a fixture that connects to
                a
                > standard air hose commonly used for compressors:
                > http://germes-online.com/direct/dbimage/50243197/Air_Compressor.jpg
                >
                > Just before the fitting, I will add a paper filter, then a
                charcoal
                > filter to keep dirt from going all the way to the compressor.
                >
                > -----
                >
                > I have an old, small, well used, 1/3 HP compressor that I will put
                on
                > this end.
                >
                > I may eventually want to add a valve on the end of the hose next
                to
                > the pipe fitting (something like this):
                > <http://indiamart.com/metrovalves/pcat-gifs/products-small/ball-
                > valves.jpg>
                >
                > The purpose is to run the compressor (hooked up to the suction
                end,
                > of course) until a bit of suction is built up in the tube. Then I
                > turn off the valve (and the compressor) so the compressor does not
                > keep building pressure and the pipe stays "empty". But, I need
                > something inexpensive for this. Still looking.
                >
                > Ok, then I will put a
                >
                > So, all told, I would have to buy:
                > * 2 caps for the pipe - $6 each - (~$12)
                > * Silicon hose - ? any ideas on some suitable hose? ?~$10 ** HELP
                > NEEDED HERE **
                > * 2 Connectors for the silicon hose - ?$2 each (~$4)
                > * The connector for the silicon hose to the PVC cap (Male to Male
                > adapter). ~$3
                > * The connector for the compressor hose to the PVC cap (Male to
                Male
                > adapter). ~$3
                > * The vacuum safety valve - $10
                > * Solenoid valve for the pipe to hose. - ?$30!
                > * ? Anything else ?
                >
                >
                > ------------------------------
                >
                > Ok, that is Plan A. If it starts looking too complex, I go to Plan
                B.
                >
                > PLAN B:
                >
                > Perhaps I start looking at buying a unit like this:
                > http://www.circuitspecialists.com/prod.itml/icOid/8013
                >
                > or I get a better workstation with a vacuum pump like this:
                > http://www.circuitspecialists.com/prod.itml/icOid/7789
                >
                >
                > ** ANY IDEAS ON BETTER "BUY" OPTIONS? **
                >
                > Thanks everyone!
                >
                > Bob H.
                >
              • Mears, Alan (AS17)
                My wife bought one of the plush toys which has a voice in it. In this case, a little dog which snores to some music and says goodnight at the end. Awwww -
                Message 7 of 24 , Jul 30, 2007
                • 0 Attachment
                  My wife bought one of the plush toys which has a voice in it. In this
                  case, a little dog which snores to some music and says "goodnight" at
                  the end. Awwww - how cute ;)

                  Anyway, I've always wondered how that is done. How do you record a sound
                  in toys such as this so that it can playback a sound when a button is
                  pressed?

                  -Alan
                • Brian
                  Good question but it should be a new post if anything. There are many ways a sound can be recorded. But this site, I think, is beyond the scope of what you
                  Message 8 of 24 , Jul 30, 2007
                  • 0 Attachment
                    Good question but it should be a new post if anything. There are many
                    ways a sound can be recorded. But this site, I think, is beyond the
                    scope of what you ask. Recording sound and playing it back in a toy
                    involves a microprocessor and memory, this could be a steep leaning
                    curve. A sound is recorded and stored in memory and played back when
                    an input, button, is pressed.

                    Brian

                    --- In Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com, "Mears, Alan (AS17)"
                    <Alan.Mears@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > My wife bought one of the plush toys which has a voice in it. In this
                    > case, a little dog which snores to some music and says "goodnight" at
                    > the end. Awwww - how cute ;)
                    >
                    > Anyway, I've always wondered how that is done. How do you record a
                    sound
                    > in toys such as this so that it can playback a sound when a button is
                    > pressed?
                    >
                    > -Alan
                    >
                  • JanRwl@AOL.COM
                    Alan: The recording is digital in a large ROM, probably a couple megabytes, and a tiny IC amplifier. ************************************** Get a sneak peek
                    Message 9 of 24 , Jul 30, 2007
                    • 0 Attachment
                      Alan: The recording is "digital" in a large ROM, probably a couple
                      megabytes, and a tiny IC amplifier.




                      ************************************** Get a sneak peek of the all-new AOL at
                      http://discover.aol.com/memed/aolcom30tour


                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    • Leon
                      ... From: Mears, Alan (AS17) To: Sent: Tuesday, July 31, 2007 3:20 AM Subject: [Electronics_101]
                      Message 10 of 24 , Jul 30, 2007
                      • 0 Attachment
                        ----- Original Message -----
                        From: "Mears, Alan (AS17)" <Alan.Mears@...>
                        To: <Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com>
                        Sent: Tuesday, July 31, 2007 3:20 AM
                        Subject: [Electronics_101] Voices in a toy...


                        > My wife bought one of the plush toys which has a voice in it. In this
                        > case, a little dog which snores to some music and says "goodnight" at
                        > the end. Awwww - how cute ;)
                        >
                        > Anyway, I've always wondered how that is done. How do you record a sound
                        > in toys such as this so that it can playback a sound when a button is
                        > pressed?

                        It's a little chip made by Winbond that records the sound using analogue
                        storage:

                        http://www.winbond-usa.com/mambo/content/view/36/140/

                        Leon
                      • Bob Hyland
                        ... A few months ago, RadioShack sold a little chip that could record 20 seconds or so of digital sound. I think the cost was something like $1.49. There are
                        Message 11 of 24 , Jul 31, 2007
                        • 0 Attachment
                          --- "Leon" <leon355@...> wrote:
                          > ----- Original Message -----
                          > From: "Mears, Alan (AS17)" <Alan.Mears@...>
                          > Sent: Tuesday, July 31, 2007 3:20 AM
                          >
                          > > My wife bought one of the plush toys which has a voice in it. In
                          > > this case, a little dog which snores to some music and says
                          > > "goodnight" at the end. Awwww - how cute ;)
                          > >
                          > > Anyway, I've always wondered how that is done. How do you record
                          > > a sound in toys such as this so that it can playback a sound
                          > > when a button is pressed?
                          >
                          > It's a little chip made by Winbond that records the sound using
                          > analogue storage:
                          >
                          > http://www.winbond-usa.com/mambo/content/view/36/140/
                          >
                          > Leon

                          A few months ago, RadioShack sold a little chip that could record 20
                          seconds or so of digital sound. I think the cost was something like
                          $1.49. There are also a bunch of places that sell those little
                          picture frames with a button and a speaker on the front. You push
                          and hold in the button -- when it beaps, you can record anything for
                          up to 20 seconds. The speaker also doubles as the microphone.

                          Bob H.
                        • Norm Carlberg
                          I wrote a program that does just that. A Microchip and flash memory. CD quality mono. Not for beginner. http://www.picbasic.org/forum/showthread.php?t=6870
                          Message 12 of 24 , Jul 31, 2007
                          • 0 Attachment
                            I wrote a program that does just that.
                            A Microchip and flash memory. CD quality mono.
                            Not for beginner.
                            http://www.picbasic.org/forum/showthread.php?t=6870

                            Norm


                            ----- Original Message -----
                            From: Bob Hyland
                            To: Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com
                            Sent: Tuesday, July 31, 2007 10:59 PM
                            Subject: [Electronics_101] Re: Voices in a toy...


                            --- "Leon" <leon355@...> wrote:
                            > ----- Original Message -----
                            > From: "Mears, Alan (AS17)" <Alan.Mears@...>
                            > Sent: Tuesday, July 31, 2007 3:20 AM
                            >
                            > > My wife bought one of the plush toys which has a voice in it. In
                            > > this case, a little dog which snores to some music and says
                            > > "goodnight" at the end. Awwww - how cute ;)
                            > >
                            > > Anyway, I've always wondered how that is done. How do you record
                            > > a sound in toys such as this so that it can playback a sound
                            > > when a button is pressed?
                            >
                            > It's a little chip made by Winbond that records the sound using
                            > analogue storage:
                            >
                            > http://www.winbond-usa.com/mambo/content/view/36/140/
                            >
                            > Leon

                            A few months ago, RadioShack sold a little chip that could record 20
                            seconds or so of digital sound. I think the cost was something like
                            $1.49. There are also a bunch of places that sell those little
                            picture frames with a button and a speaker on the front. You push
                            and hold in the button -- when it beaps, you can record anything for
                            up to 20 seconds. The speaker also doubles as the microphone.

                            Bob H.





                            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                          Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.