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Re: Project to demo wind energy

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  • otlski
    For a different approach, Google Picoturbine . Depending on the age of the kids, it may be a more fulfilling project. Although he sells the kits, he also is
    Message 1 of 8 , Feb 4, 2007
      For a different approach, Google 'Picoturbine'. Depending on the age
      of the kids, it may be a more fulfilling project. Although he sells
      the kits, he also is kind enough to give you the complete
      instructions for free if you want to source your own parts. I think
      Edmunds may sell their kit as well.

      Dan

      --- In Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com, "msmesurfer" <mikejdl120@...>
      wrote:
      >
      > I'm looking to create a small wind power demo. The idea is to get
      a
      > small electric motor, like a 1.5v motor from radio shack, then
      attach a
      > propeller to the shaft. Then connect the motor leads to an LED.
      By
      > blowing on the propeller it turns the shaft and runs the motor as a
      > generator to light up the LED. That the idea to demo to a young
      group
      > of students. Can anyone offer advice on how to make this work ?
      >
    • Armin Keller
      I think you had the idea spot on. You ll have to experiment with motor size, and also the polarity of the motor, since the LED is polarity sensitive. You might
      Message 2 of 8 , Feb 4, 2007
        I think you had the idea spot on. You'll have to experiment with motor
        size, and also the polarity of the motor, since the LED is polarity
        sensitive.

        You might try using a vertical propeller like this:
        http://www.makezine.com/blog/archive/2006/07/how_to_build_your_own_wind_tur.html)

        Let us know how it works out!

        Armindilo



        --- In Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com, "msmesurfer" <mikejdl120@...>
        wrote:
        >
        > I'm looking to create a small wind power demo. The idea is to get a
        > small electric motor, like a 1.5v motor from radio shack, then attach a
        > propeller to the shaft. Then connect the motor leads to an LED. By
        > blowing on the propeller it turns the shaft and runs the motor as a
        > generator to light up the LED. That the idea to demo to a young group
        > of students. Can anyone offer advice on how to make this work ?
        >
      • LT Ron Wright
        Yes your approach should work. Finding a 1.5 volt motor may be hard for most are made to run on common voltages like 12 volts, but these should work also,
        Message 3 of 8 , Feb 4, 2007
          Yes your approach should work. Finding a 1.5 volt motor may be hard
          for most are made to run on common voltages like 12 volts, but these
          should work also, just will not generate as much voltage at low speeds.

          For the LED put a small resistor, you can get these at Radio Shack as
          well, in series with the LED. Say a 10 ohm and this will allow a
          typical 2 volt LED to work on other voltages. The LED conducts in one
          direction for it is a diode, just one that emits light when powered.

          Normally an LED has the longer lead as positive so this should go to
          the positive. However, if you run the motor one direction it will
          provide for one polarity and the other direction the other. So if
          connecting and the LED does not light put wind from the other direction.

          I would recommend a small hand held battery operated fan, one of those
          that one gets to cool ones self. It would have all you need except the
          LED and resistor. Another one could be used to generate the wind, but
          blowing on it could be done by the students and they might get
          excited. With this fan one could demo that a voltage from a battery
          can make wind and then demo the same can take wind and make
          voltage/current/power.

          All except maybe the propeller can be had at Radio shack.

          Good luck with your project.

          73, ron, n9ee/r
          Tampa, FL (we use solar here...not much wind here...well most of the
          time, but at other times we get out of the way, hi.


          --- In Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com, "msmesurfer" <mikejdl120@...>
          wrote:
          >
          > I'm looking to create a small wind power demo. The idea is to get a
          > small electric motor, like a 1.5v motor from radio shack, then attach
          a
          > propeller to the shaft. Then connect the motor leads to an LED. By
          > blowing on the propeller it turns the shaft and runs the motor as a
          > generator to light up the LED. That the idea to demo to a young
          group
          > of students. Can anyone offer advice on how to make this work ?
          >
        • Ross McKenzie
          ... Hi, As already stated by some others, you will need a motor whose operating voltage is greater than your LED. I would suggest a visit to your local
          Message 4 of 8 , Feb 5, 2007
            msmesurfer wrote:

            >I'm looking to create a small wind power demo. The idea is to get a
            >small electric motor, like a 1.5v motor from radio shack, then attach a
            >propeller to the shaft. Then connect the motor leads to an LED. By
            >blowing on the propeller it turns the shaft and runs the motor as a
            >generator to light up the LED. That the idea to demo to a young group
            >of students. Can anyone offer advice on how to make this work ?
            >
            >
            >
            >

            Hi,

            As already stated by some others, you will need a motor whose operating
            voltage is greater than your LED. I would suggest a visit to your local
            computer shop and ask for one or two dead computer power supplies. These
            have a 12 VDC fan inside which is usually OK, but noisy. It has its own
            set of propellor blades and housing. I have a dozen or more here,
            Melbourne Australia, but that would be a bit far I suspect <g>. I would
            probably put a bridge rectifier across its leads so that the LED will
            operate no matter what direction the wind is coming from.

            Best of luck.

            Regards,

            Ross McKenzie
            ValuSoft
            Melbourne Australia
          • LT Ron Wright
            Don t most of these type of fans have electronics inside. Most I have do, but could be much simplier. Probably seen more in AC type. 73, ron, n9ee/r ... a
            Message 5 of 8 , Feb 6, 2007
              Don't most of these type of fans have electronics inside. Most I
              have do, but could be much simplier. Probably seen more in AC type.

              73, ron, n9ee/r



              --- In Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com, Ross McKenzie <valusoft@...>
              wrote:
              >
              >
              > msmesurfer wrote:
              >
              > >I'm looking to create a small wind power demo. The idea is to get
              a
              > >small electric motor, like a 1.5v motor from radio shack, then
              attach a
              > >propeller to the shaft. Then connect the motor leads to an LED.
              By
              > >blowing on the propeller it turns the shaft and runs the motor as
              a
              > >generator to light up the LED. That the idea to demo to a young
              group
              > >of students. Can anyone offer advice on how to make this work ?
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              >
              > Hi,
              >
              > As already stated by some others, you will need a motor whose
              operating
              > voltage is greater than your LED. I would suggest a visit to your
              local
              > computer shop and ask for one or two dead computer power supplies.
              These
              > have a 12 VDC fan inside which is usually OK, but noisy. It has its
              own
              > set of propellor blades and housing. I have a dozen or more here,
              > Melbourne Australia, but that would be a bit far I suspect <g>. I
              would
              > probably put a bridge rectifier across its leads so that the LED
              will
              > operate no matter what direction the wind is coming from.
              >
              > Best of luck.
              >
              > Regards,
              >
              > Ross McKenzie
              > ValuSoft
              > Melbourne Australia
              >
            • Ross McKenzie
              ... Ron, No. I suggest that you look at the motor. You will probably find a Hall effect sensor to monitor the fan s speed. The interface is on the motherboard.
              Message 6 of 8 , Feb 6, 2007
                LT Ron Wright wrote:

                >Don't most of these type of fans have electronics inside. Most I
                >have do, but could be much simplier. Probably seen more in AC type.
                >
                >73, ron, n9ee/r
                >
                >
                >
                Ron,

                No. I suggest that you look at the motor. You will probably find a Hall
                effect sensor to monitor the fan's speed. The interface is on the
                motherboard. The fan motor still has a red and black wire pair for
                power. Computer fans are at the lowest, simplest end of the complexity
                spectrum.

                Regards,

                Ross McKenzie
                ValuSoft
                Melbourne Australia
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