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Flash Fires In PVC Pipes

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  • academician@talk21.com
    Hi All, Dust explosions can happen alright - My own Grandfather got some very nasty flash burns after the war, working in a factory that used flour. I don t
    Message 1 of 18 , Nov 30, 2006
      Hi All,

      Dust explosions can happen alright - My own Grandfather got some very nasty flash burns after the war, working in a factory that used flour. I don't think they ever found the cause of the ignition, but caused considerable damage and burnt many workers. Thankfully no-one killed.

      I've no experience of powders moving through PVC pipe, but it seems plausible. If by chance the fuel/air mixture is just right when a spark is created for any reason...

      Anyone else remember doing the Mner's Safety Lamp at school? They used a wire mesh so that if any combustible gasses were ignited by the flame in the lamp, the mesh would take enough heat out of the flam to stop it flashing outside the lamp and igniting all of the fire damp.

      Something similar is used in battery-powered smoke detectors, to stop the tiny sparks in the ionisation chamber from igniting the smoke or vapours and causing an explosion.

      If only something similar could be fitted into pipes that would not clog up, it would stop any "flash" before it reached dangerous levels.

      On a slightly different level, think how a car's silencer (US = Muffler) works. Does anyone have any ideas on if tanks placed regularly along PVC pipe might stop any flash from growing to dangerous levels, by firstly giving the hot gasses room to expand and so reducing the pressure in the pipe. Secondly, by acting as a "fire gap" where the fuel/air mixture would be wrong, causing any flash to die out again? Just a thought...

      Best wishes to all!
      Tony

      Send instant messages to your online friends http://uk.messenger.yahoo.com

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Stefan Trethan
      On Thu, 30 Nov 2006 22:37:55 +0100, academician@talk21.com ... I think both ideas are very impractical.. A _possible_ solution to explosion problems like this
      Message 2 of 18 , Nov 30, 2006
        On Thu, 30 Nov 2006 22:37:55 +0100, academician@...
        <academician@...> wrote:

        > Anyone else remember doing the Mner's Safety Lamp at school? They used
        > a wire mesh so that if any combustible gasses were ignited by the flame
        > in the lamp, the mesh would take enough heat out of the flam to stop it
        > flashing outside the lamp and igniting all of the fire damp.
        > Something similar is used in battery-powered smoke detectors, to stop
        > the tiny sparks in the ionisation chamber from igniting the smoke or
        > vapours and causing an explosion.
        > If only something similar could be fitted into pipes that would not
        > clog up, it would stop any "flash" before it reached dangerous levels.
        > On a slightly different level, think how a car's silencer (US =
        > Muffler) works. Does anyone have any ideas on if tanks placed regularly
        > along PVC pipe might stop any flash from growing to dangerous levels, by
        > firstly giving the hot gasses room to expand and so reducing the
        > pressure in the pipe. Secondly, by acting as a "fire gap" where the
        > fuel/air mixture would be wrong, causing any flash to die out again?
        > Just a thought...
        > Best wishes to all!
        > Tony


        I think both ideas are very impractical..


        A _possible_ solution to explosion problems like this is blow-out openings
        that are large enough to allow the expanding gasses to escape before the
        pressure is high enough to shatter the pipe. one possibility could be to
        split the pipe in half lengthwise, or at least cut off large sections at
        intervals to allow mounting, and tape them back on with tape that is not
        reinforced. Or use rubber seals and just hold the halves together with
        gravity. When it blows the pressure can now escape. Possibly T-pieces at
        intervals covered with simple flat plates would allow enough pressure
        relief, and could act as inspection/cleaning openings at the same time.
        Maybe one could even use the same T-pieces for attachment ports, and have
        a number of unused port covers only lightly held in place.

        Of course that would only work with suction, not positive pressure, but
        that's how extractors run anyway.

        But this is silly, just don't use plastic pipes for dust extraction ;-)

        ST
      • rtstofer
        ... Muffler) works. Does anyone have any ideas on if tanks placed regularly along PVC pipe might stop any flash from growing to dangerous levels, by firstly
        Message 3 of 18 , Nov 30, 2006
          > On a slightly different level, think how a car's silencer (US =
          Muffler) works. Does anyone have any ideas on if tanks placed
          regularly along PVC pipe might stop any flash from growing to
          dangerous levels, by firstly giving the hot gasses room to expand and
          so reducing the pressure in the pipe. Secondly, by acting as a "fire
          gap" where the fuel/air mixture would be wrong, causing any flash to
          die out again? Just a thought...
          >
          > Best wishes to all!
          > Tony
          >
          > Send instant messages to your online friends
          http://uk.messenger.yahoo.com
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >

          When you think of the pressure wavefront moving at multiples of tens
          of thousands of feet per second, it doesn't seem likely that the air
          can go very far in essentially zero time.

          The NPFA document I mentioned the other day does have a reference for
          explosion blow out dampers but that assumes that the ducting doesn't
          fracture first.

          The issue with PVC is the fracturing as opposed to simply splitting
          for a metal duct.

          Richard
        • Bean
          Never anyone heard of explosions in coal mines, caused by dust? I know there is gas present, but also the dust can ignite by itself and cause explosions....
          Message 4 of 18 , Nov 30, 2006
            Never anyone heard of explosions in coal mines, caused by dust? I know there is gas present, but also the dust can ignite by itself and cause explosions....
            ----- Original Message -----
            From: academician@...
            To: Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Thursday, November 30, 2006 9:37 PM
            Subject: [Electronics_101] Flash Fires In PVC Pipes


            Hi All,

            Dust explosions can happen alright - My own Grandfather got some very nasty flash burns after the war, working in a factory that used flour. I don't think they ever found the cause of the ignition, but caused considerable damage and burnt many workers. Thankfully no-one killed.

            I've no experience of powders moving through PVC pipe, but it seems plausible. If by chance the fuel/air mixture is just right when a spark is created for any reason...

            Anyone else remember doing the Mner's Safety Lamp at school? They used a wire mesh so that if any combustible gasses were ignited by the flame in the lamp, the mesh would take enough heat out of the flam to stop it flashing outside the lamp and igniting all of the fire damp.

            Something similar is used in battery-powered smoke detectors, to stop the tiny sparks in the ionisation chamber from igniting the smoke or vapours and causing an explosion.

            If only something similar could be fitted into pipes that would not clog up, it would stop any "flash" before it reached dangerous levels.

            On a slightly different level, think how a car's silencer (US = Muffler) works. Does anyone have any ideas on if tanks placed regularly along PVC pipe might stop any flash from growing to dangerous levels, by firstly giving the hot gasses room to expand and so reducing the pressure in the pipe. Secondly, by acting as a "fire gap" where the fuel/air mixture would be wrong, causing any flash to die out again? Just a thought...

            Best wishes to all!
            Tony

            Send instant messages to your online friends http://uk.messenger.yahoo.com

            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




            Yahoo! Groups Links




            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • lcdpublishing
            The discussion isn t about whether or not dust explosions can happen - that is well know. The discussion is if it can happen in a dust collection system used
            Message 5 of 18 , Nov 30, 2006
              The discussion isn't about whether or not dust explosions can
              happen - that is well know. The discussion is if it can happen in a
              dust collection system used in a home woodworking shop.

              The primary differences between coal mines, flour mills, and grain
              silos is the rate at which the dust is moving. In a mine, flour
              mill, and grain silo (and any others that I can think of), the dust
              cloud is somewhat stationary. It might be moving a low velocity,
              but not at the rate it is moving through a dust collection duct.
              For example, the unit I have has an airflow of 1200 CFM - derated
              for "real world" say it's 900 CFM. So, that's 900 CFM moving
              through a 4" pipe (or larger if you prefer). That dust field is
              moving at a fairly high rate of speed and it is not a consistant
              dust cloud, it is constantly changing depending on what machine you
              are using.

              It is this that makes me believe it is far less likely to have a
              dust explosion in a dust collection system than with any of the
              other typical sources for dust explosions.

              Chris
            • JanRwl@AOL.COM
              In a message dated 12/1/2006 12:09:16 P.M. Central Standard Time, lcdpublishing@yahoo.com writes: It is this that makes me believe it is far less likely to
              Message 6 of 18 , Dec 1, 2006
                In a message dated 12/1/2006 12:09:16 P.M. Central Standard Time,
                lcdpublishing@... writes:

                It is this that makes me believe it is far less likely to have a dust
                explosion in a dust collection system than with any of the other typical sources
                for dust explosions. <<
                Chris: I worked in a pipeorgan manufacturing firm for 20 years, and our PVC
                self-cobbled dust-system using a 5 hp Dayton (Grainger's) dust-collector
                never, ever caused the slightest difficulty with explosion nor fire! All this
                is surely an old-wives' tale! I know several colleagues who installed their
                own the same way, and NONE have reported any difficulties. I do NOT know
                which wrapped the pipe with grounded wire and painted over with latex paint as we
                did. That totally eliminated any "static" that only caused attraction of
                dust on the outside of the pipe. Sawdust and planer-chips are rarely fine
                enough to ignite as a gas might.





                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • Stefan Trethan
                ... Just because you or your friends have not had a kidney stone does not make kidney stones an old-wives tale! I do apologize if you had a kindney stone, but
                Message 7 of 18 , Dec 1, 2006
                  On Sat, 02 Dec 2006 02:28:49 +0100, <JanRwl@...> wrote:

                  > It is this that makes me believe it is far less likely to have a dust
                  > explosion in a dust collection system than with any of the other
                  > typical sources
                  > for dust explosions. <<
                  > Chris: I worked in a pipeorgan manufacturing firm for 20 years, and
                  > our PVC
                  > self-cobbled dust-system using a 5 hp Dayton (Grainger's) dust-collector
                  > never, ever caused the slightest difficulty with explosion nor fire!
                  > All this
                  > is surely an old-wives' tale! I know several colleagues who installed
                  > their
                  > own the same way, and NONE have reported any difficulties. I do NOT
                  > know
                  > which wrapped the pipe with grounded wire and painted over with latex
                  > paint as we
                  > did. That totally eliminated any "static" that only caused attraction
                  > of
                  > dust on the outside of the pipe. Sawdust and planer-chips are rarely
                  > fine
                  > enough to ignite as a gas might.


                  Just because you or your friends have not had a kidney stone does not make
                  kidney stones an old-wives tale!

                  I do apologize if you had a kindney stone, but saying something doesn't
                  happen just because it didn't happen to you is just stupid.
                  Even if you never had an accident before, does it make it reasonable to
                  drive without a seatbelt or drunken?

                  ST
                • JanRwl@AOL.COM
                  In a message dated 12/1/2006 8:35:24 P.M. Central Standard Time, stefan_trethan@gmx.at writes: I do apologize if you had a kindney stone, but saying something
                  Message 8 of 18 , Dec 1, 2006
                    In a message dated 12/1/2006 8:35:24 P.M. Central Standard Time,
                    stefan_trethan@... writes:

                    I do apologize if you had a kindney stone, but saying something doesn't
                    happen just because it didn't happen to you is just stupid.
                    Even if you never had an accident before, does it make it reasonable to
                    drive without a seatbelt or drunken?



                    ST, if you were American, I bet you'd be a Democrat!


                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  • Stefan Trethan
                    ... I d be reasonable if that s what you are asking. I thought the one implies the other, especially now. But you know politics is not allowed here. ST
                    Message 9 of 18 , Dec 2, 2006
                      On Sat, 02 Dec 2006 08:09:26 +0100, <JanRwl@...> wrote:

                      > In a message dated 12/1/2006 8:35:24 P.M. Central Standard Time,
                      > stefan_trethan@... writes:
                      >> I do apologize if you had a kindney stone, but saying something doesn't
                      >> happen just because it didn't happen to you is just stupid.
                      >> Even if you never had an accident before, does it make it reasonable to
                      >> drive without a seatbelt or drunken?

                      > ST, if you were American, I bet you'd be a Democrat!


                      I'd be reasonable if that's what you are asking. I thought the one implies
                      the other, especially now.

                      But you know politics is not allowed here.

                      ST
                    • Joseph Plowick Jr.
                      What makes you think he s not American...He very hard headed & argumentative. But PLEASE don t start him on politics. ROFL JanRwl@AOL.COM wrote: In a message
                      Message 10 of 18 , Dec 2, 2006
                        What makes you think he's not American...He very hard headed & argumentative. But PLEASE don't start him on politics. ROFL

                        JanRwl@... wrote:
                        In a message dated 12/1/2006 8:35:24 P.M. Central Standard Time,
                        stefan_trethan@... writes:

                        I do apologize if you had a kindney stone, but saying something doesn't
                        happen just because it didn't happen to you is just stupid.
                        Even if you never had an accident before, does it make it reasonable to
                        drive without a seatbelt or drunken?

                        ST, if you were American, I bet you'd be a Democrat!

                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]






                        ---------------------------------
                        Everyone is raving about the all-new Yahoo! Mail beta.

                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      • Dave Mucha
                        ... Chris, et-al, This discussion has little thought behind it. Sorry guys. but if you run anything past anything else, there is a possibility of static
                        Message 11 of 18 , Dec 2, 2006
                          --- In Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com, "lcdpublishing"
                          <lcdpublishing@...> wrote:
                          >
                          > The discussion isn't about whether or not dust explosions can
                          > happen - that is well know. The discussion is if it can happen in a
                          > dust collection system used in a home woodworking shop.
                          >

                          Chris, et-al,

                          This discussion has little thought behind it. Sorry guys.

                          but if you run anything past anything else, there is a possibility of
                          static electricity conformiting. Just a simple fact.

                          Drop water past a ring and a tiny charge will occur. place that ring
                          under running water and you get more charge. There is a guy who shows
                          how to make a tiny generator by using this property on a waterfall.

                          As for the exhaust system.

                          wood dust (particulate) does have a LEL or Lower Explosive Level.
                          with the proper atmosphere and a source of combustion, fuel and
                          oxygen, you can get an explosion. below the LEL, there is little
                          risk. above it, there is a HUGE risk.


                          From the MSDS of wood: (yes, wood has an MSDS)

                          UNUSUAL FIRE AND EXPLOSION HAZARDS:
                          Depending on moisture content and
                          more importantly, particle diameter,
                          wood dust may explode in the
                          presence of an ignition source.
                          An airborne concentration of
                          40 grams (40,000 mg) of dust per
                          cubic meter of air is often used as
                          the LEL for wood dust.

                          1 m^3 = about 35 cu feet.
                          4" pipe x 900 CFM = 23m^3 per min
                          or about 2 pounds per minute of dust.

                          PVC pipe is a great storage medium for those little charges.
                          Lots of wood dust can create lots of tiny charges
                          pvc is a poor conductor so it does need a drain wire.

                          Like plane crashes, or death by bee stings, they are extremely
                          infrequent. (please no political comments, you can pick any analogy,
                          these were not chosen for any particular reason)

                          There is a level of complacency we all achieve.
                          when was the last time you backed up your hard drive ?
                          when was the last time you handled an IC without a static strap on
                          your wrist ?

                          An exhaust duct explosion in a home shop is rare for a few reasons.
                          #1) a continuous stream of wood is not present
                          #2) the pipe does not hold the charge well
                          #3) there are few opportunities for a spark

                          A wire on the outside of the pipe is of little use. Using metal for
                          the pipe is the obvious solution, but not as slick as plastic.
                          Drilling and tapping a hole, then screwing in a metal screw would
                          allow the charge to drain to an external wire.

                          Another example; Car tires have become more wear resistant and there
                          was a time before they started adding some sort of conductive material
                          into the tires when the car would build up a charge and when you
                          exited the car, you would get a shock. There have been many fires
                          from filling a car when that charge encountered the filling hose.

                          To beat my own horn, I met with some chemists at Hercules in their
                          corp hq and when I brought this to their attention, they both had that
                          look of putting it together. They made the additives to make tires
                          last longer, and within a year were adding other stuffs to reduce the
                          potential that would otherwise build up.

                          I think if we talk about the engineering, the discussion will be
                          easier for everyone.

                          Dave
                        • Stefan Trethan
                          On Sat, 02 Dec 2006 14:39:03 +0100, Dave Mucha ... Some wood dusts are also carcinogenic. Take that you bio people ;-) ST
                          Message 12 of 18 , Dec 2, 2006
                            On Sat, 02 Dec 2006 14:39:03 +0100, Dave Mucha <dave_mucha@...>
                            wrote:

                            >
                            > From the MSDS of wood: (yes, wood has an MSDS)


                            Some wood dusts are also carcinogenic.
                            Take that you "bio" people ;-)

                            ST
                          • lcdpublishing
                            Okay, so now we are getting more exact facts to work with... ... If I understand this correctly, in order for an explosion to happen you would need 2 pounds of
                            Message 13 of 18 , Dec 2, 2006
                              Okay, so now we are getting more exact facts to work with...

                              > 1 m^3 = about 35 cu feet.
                              > 4" pipe x 900 CFM = 23m^3 per min
                              > or about 2 pounds per minute of dust.

                              If I understand this correctly, in order for an explosion to happen
                              you would need 2 pounds of dust (DUST- not chips) passing through
                              the duct work and then an ignition source. There is no machine in a
                              home woodworking shop that can generate 2 pounds of dust in one
                              minute. I have a 16" wide drum sander that is about as big of a
                              sander as you can get (for home use) and it simply cannot generate
                              that amount of dust. I would estimate you would have a tough time
                              getting that much dust in 15 minutes. I don't even think my planer
                              can produce 2 pounds of chips in one minute and those are big
                              shavings.

                              While it is possible for anything to happen at some point in time, I
                              am still not convinced that there would be a dust explosion in any
                              duct work used in this manor. I guess it boils down to the old
                              saying "I will believe it when I see it".

                              Chris





                              --- In Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com, "Dave Mucha"
                              <dave_mucha@...> wrote:
                              >
                              > --- In Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com, "lcdpublishing"
                              > <lcdpublishing@> wrote:
                              > >
                              > > The discussion isn't about whether or not dust explosions can
                              > > happen - that is well know. The discussion is if it can happen
                              in a
                              > > dust collection system used in a home woodworking shop.
                              > >
                              >
                              > Chris, et-al,
                              >
                              > This discussion has little thought behind it. Sorry guys.
                              >
                              > but if you run anything past anything else, there is a possibility
                              of
                              > static electricity conformiting. Just a simple fact.
                              >
                              > Drop water past a ring and a tiny charge will occur. place that
                              ring
                              > under running water and you get more charge. There is a guy who
                              shows
                              > how to make a tiny generator by using this property on a waterfall.
                              >
                              > As for the exhaust system.
                              >
                              > wood dust (particulate) does have a LEL or Lower Explosive Level.
                              > with the proper atmosphere and a source of combustion, fuel and
                              > oxygen, you can get an explosion. below the LEL, there is little
                              > risk. above it, there is a HUGE risk.
                              >
                              >
                              > From the MSDS of wood: (yes, wood has an MSDS)
                              >
                              > UNUSUAL FIRE AND EXPLOSION HAZARDS:
                              > Depending on moisture content and
                              > more importantly, particle diameter,
                              > wood dust may explode in the
                              > presence of an ignition source.
                              > An airborne concentration of
                              > 40 grams (40,000 mg) of dust per
                              > cubic meter of air is often used as
                              > the LEL for wood dust.
                              >
                              > 1 m^3 = about 35 cu feet.
                              > 4" pipe x 900 CFM = 23m^3 per min
                              > or about 2 pounds per minute of dust.
                              >
                              > PVC pipe is a great storage medium for those little charges.
                              > Lots of wood dust can create lots of tiny charges
                              > pvc is a poor conductor so it does need a drain wire.
                              >
                              > Like plane crashes, or death by bee stings, they are extremely
                              > infrequent. (please no political comments, you can pick any
                              analogy,
                              > these were not chosen for any particular reason)
                              >
                              > There is a level of complacency we all achieve.
                              > when was the last time you backed up your hard drive ?
                              > when was the last time you handled an IC without a static strap on
                              > your wrist ?
                              >
                              > An exhaust duct explosion in a home shop is rare for a few
                              reasons.
                              > #1) a continuous stream of wood is not present
                              > #2) the pipe does not hold the charge well
                              > #3) there are few opportunities for a spark
                              >
                              > A wire on the outside of the pipe is of little use. Using metal for
                              > the pipe is the obvious solution, but not as slick as plastic.
                              > Drilling and tapping a hole, then screwing in a metal screw would
                              > allow the charge to drain to an external wire.
                              >
                              > Another example; Car tires have become more wear resistant and
                              there
                              > was a time before they started adding some sort of conductive
                              material
                              > into the tires when the car would build up a charge and when you
                              > exited the car, you would get a shock. There have been many fires
                              > from filling a car when that charge encountered the filling hose.
                              >
                              > To beat my own horn, I met with some chemists at Hercules in their
                              > corp hq and when I brought this to their attention, they both had
                              that
                              > look of putting it together. They made the additives to make tires
                              > last longer, and within a year were adding other stuffs to reduce
                              the
                              > potential that would otherwise build up.
                              >
                              > I think if we talk about the engineering, the discussion will be
                              > easier for everyone.
                              >
                              > Dave
                              >
                            • Leon Heller
                              ... From: Stefan Trethan To: Sent: Saturday, December 02, 2006 2:05 PM Subject: Re:
                              Message 14 of 18 , Dec 2, 2006
                                ----- Original Message -----
                                From: "Stefan Trethan" <stefan_trethan@...>
                                To: <Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com>
                                Sent: Saturday, December 02, 2006 2:05 PM
                                Subject: Re: [Electronics_101] Re: Flash Fires In PVC Pipes


                                > On Sat, 02 Dec 2006 14:39:03 +0100, Dave Mucha <dave_mucha@...>
                                > wrote:
                                >
                                >>
                                >> From the MSDS of wood: (yes, wood has an MSDS)
                                >
                                >
                                > Some wood dusts are also carcinogenic.
                                > Take that you "bio" people ;-)

                                There used to be lots of furniture manufacturers in High Wycombe; there was
                                a very high incidence of nasal cancer amongst the workers caused by wood
                                dust.

                                Leon
                              • Stefan Trethan
                                On Sat, 02 Dec 2006 15:09:20 +0100, lcdpublishing ... Ok, but there might easily be situations when the dust collects somewhere and then suddenly dislodges. We
                                Message 15 of 18 , Dec 2, 2006
                                  On Sat, 02 Dec 2006 15:09:20 +0100, lcdpublishing
                                  <lcdpublishing@...> wrote:

                                  >
                                  > If I understand this correctly, in order for an explosion to happen
                                  > you would need 2 pounds of dust (DUST- not chips) passing through
                                  > the duct work and then an ignition source. There is no machine in a
                                  > home woodworking shop that can generate 2 pounds of dust in one
                                  > minute.

                                  Ok, but there might easily be situations when the dust collects somewhere
                                  and then suddenly dislodges.
                                  We know it happens only rarely.


                                  > I guess it boils down to the old
                                  > saying "I will believe it when I see it".

                                  If you see it, best don't look too closely ;-)

                                  ST
                                • lcdpublishing
                                  Nah, won t happen here, I have metal ducting. I still have to get to the mythbusters website and ask them to do it. Then I can look VERY CLOSE and still be a
                                  Message 16 of 18 , Dec 2, 2006
                                    Nah, won't happen here, I have metal ducting. I still have to get
                                    to the mythbusters website and ask them to do it. Then I can look
                                    VERY CLOSE and still be a safe distance away when I am proven wrong;-
                                    )

                                    Chris


                                    --- In Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com, "Stefan Trethan"
                                    <stefan_trethan@...> wrote:
                                    >
                                    > On Sat, 02 Dec 2006 15:09:20 +0100, lcdpublishing
                                    > <lcdpublishing@...> wrote:
                                    >
                                    > >
                                    > > If I understand this correctly, in order for an explosion to
                                    happen
                                    > > you would need 2 pounds of dust (DUST- not chips) passing through
                                    > > the duct work and then an ignition source. There is no machine
                                    in a
                                    > > home woodworking shop that can generate 2 pounds of dust in one
                                    > > minute.
                                    >
                                    > Ok, but there might easily be situations when the dust collects
                                    somewhere
                                    > and then suddenly dislodges.
                                    > We know it happens only rarely.
                                    >
                                    >
                                    > > I guess it boils down to the old
                                    > > saying "I will believe it when I see it".
                                    >
                                    > If you see it, best don't look too closely ;-)
                                    >
                                    > ST
                                    >
                                  • Stefan Trethan
                                    On Sat, 02 Dec 2006 15:58:32 +0100, lcdpublishing ... do that! ST
                                    Message 17 of 18 , Dec 2, 2006
                                      On Sat, 02 Dec 2006 15:58:32 +0100, lcdpublishing
                                      <lcdpublishing@...> wrote:

                                      > Nah, won't happen here, I have metal ducting. I still have to get
                                      > to the mythbusters website and ask them to do it. Then I can look
                                      > VERY CLOSE and still be a safe distance away when I am proven wrong;-
                                      > )
                                      > Chris


                                      do that!

                                      ST
                                    • lcdpublishing
                                      Posted the suggestion on their website this morning. It appears as though there are some people without lives that hangout on their forums. We shall see if it
                                      Message 18 of 18 , Dec 2, 2006
                                        Posted the suggestion on their website this morning. It appears as
                                        though there are some people without lives that hangout on their
                                        forums. We shall see if it comes up in a future show. I would think
                                        so, after all, those guys like blowing stuff up and it makes for
                                        good TV so I would think they would jump at the chance. I just hope
                                        that Adam doesn't stick the impeller of the dust collector up
                                        against his face like he did with the vacuum motors :-)



                                        --- In Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com, "Stefan Trethan"
                                        <stefan_trethan@...> wrote:
                                        >
                                        > On Sat, 02 Dec 2006 15:58:32 +0100, lcdpublishing
                                        > <lcdpublishing@...> wrote:
                                        >
                                        > > Nah, won't happen here, I have metal ducting. I still have to
                                        get
                                        > > to the mythbusters website and ask them to do it. Then I can
                                        look
                                        > > VERY CLOSE and still be a safe distance away when I am proven
                                        wrong;-
                                        > > )
                                        > > Chris
                                        >
                                        >
                                        > do that!
                                        >
                                        > ST
                                        >
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