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Rails

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  • jpotter2@tampabay.rr.com
    What does rails mean? For example: 5V at the rails rail to rail amplifiers As for current delivery, most will do a few milli-amps, but typically not
    Message 1 of 3 , Apr 2, 2001
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      What does "rails" mean?

      For example:

      "5V at the rails"

      "rail to rail amplifiers"

      "As for current delivery, most will do a few milli-amps, but
      typically not near the rails"

      "an opamp with a symmetric output swing at each rail"

      "as long as your supply rails were properly adjusted."

      "This pretty much slams the square right up to the rails"

      Thanks,

      JP
    • Tavys Ashcroft
      ... Unless I m mistaken (I m still learning here), the rails are the maximum and minimum voltages the amplifier can go to. Whether it s single ended or double
      Message 2 of 3 , Apr 7, 2001
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        >What does "rails" mean?
        >
        >For example:
        >
        >"5V at the rails"
        >
        >"rail to rail amplifiers"

        Unless I'm mistaken (I'm still learning here), the rails are the
        maximum and minimum voltages the amplifier can go to. Whether it's
        single ended or double ended (one transistor, or two doing push
        pull), and what the supply DC voltage is will determine this. Of
        course, by the time you get to the 'rails' you've really distorted
        your signal...but that's good, to me. Many amplifiers are more
        efficient and distort the least with lower outputs. I like to turn
        things up to eleven though. But not for guitars. Look at what your
        DC supply voltage is, and that's probably the peak to peak output
        voltage of the amplifier, though it can be less than that depending
        on the circuit. In fact, it probably will be.

        But I may have no idea what I'm talking about.

        -Tavys
      • Larry Hendry
        I didn t see an answer to this. But, mail has been slow through my server today. so forgive me if this is a repeat. Rails is a term that refers to the
        Message 3 of 3 , Apr 8, 2001
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          I didn't see an answer to this. But, mail has been slow through my
          server today. so forgive me if this is a repeat. "Rails" is a term
          that refers to the power supply voltage, often times on a bipolar
          power supply. So, if you have a typical power supply designed for op
          amps and such, it might supply +15 VDC and -15 VDC. Some might
          include +5 VDC is there are logic circuits. These power supply
          points are often called the "rails."
          Larry Hendry

          --- jpotter2@... wrote:
          > What does "rails" mean?
          >
          > For example:
          >
          > "5V at the rails"
          >
          > "rail to rail amplifiers"
          >
          > "As for current delivery, most will do a few milli-amps, but
          > typically not near the rails"
          >
          > "an opamp with a symmetric output swing at each rail"
          >
          > "as long as your supply rails were properly adjusted."
          >
          > "This pretty much slams the square right up to the rails"
          >
          > Thanks,
          >
          > JP


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