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IRL520N

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  • upand_at_them
    How the heck does the IRL520N MOSFET work? I have it on a breadboard and can t get it to switch on. According to the datasheet the Drain-to-Source breakdown
    Message 1 of 12 , Feb 1, 2005
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      How the heck does the IRL520N MOSFET work? I have it on a breadboard
      and can't get it to switch on.

      According to the datasheet the Drain-to-Source breakdown voltage is
      100V. Does this mean it won't conduct below that? I thought this
      was just a regular MOSFET with a logic-level gate. I'm trying to
      switch 5V through an LED to test it.

      Mike
    • rtstofer
      Darned if I know but from figure 1 in the datasheet I found, the current doesn t go below 100 mA. In fact, just about everything you need to know is in figure
      Message 2 of 12 , Feb 1, 2005
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        Darned if I know but from figure 1 in the datasheet I found, the
        current doesn't go below 100 mA. In fact, just about everything you
        need to know is in figure 1. Figure out what voltage you have
        between the gate and source (signal input) and you can look on the
        graph and see for a given load current what the drain to source
        voltage will be. This will tell you how much heat you will
        dissipate (Idrain * Vdrain-source).

        Later in the sheet it shows the device being trigger with a 5V input
        but I didn't see what the load resistance was.


        --- In Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com, "upand_at_them"
        <upand_at_them@y...> wrote:
        >
        > How the heck does the IRL520N MOSFET work? I have it on a
        breadboard
        > and can't get it to switch on.
        >
        > According to the datasheet the Drain-to-Source breakdown voltage
        is
        > 100V. Does this mean it won't conduct below that? I thought this
        > was just a regular MOSFET with a logic-level gate. I'm trying to
        > switch 5V through an LED to test it.
        >
        > Mike
      • Leon Heller
        ... From: upand_at_them To: Sent: Wednesday, February 02, 2005 3:12 AM Subject: [Electronics_101]
        Message 3 of 12 , Feb 1, 2005
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          ----- Original Message -----
          From: "upand_at_them" <upand_at_them@...>
          To: <Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com>
          Sent: Wednesday, February 02, 2005 3:12 AM
          Subject: [Electronics_101] IRL520N


          >
          >
          > How the heck does the IRL520N MOSFET work? I have it on a breadboard
          > and can't get it to switch on.
          >
          > According to the datasheet the Drain-to-Source breakdown voltage is
          > 100V. Does this mean it won't conduct below that? I thought this
          > was just a regular MOSFET with a logic-level gate. I'm trying to
          > switch 5V through an LED to test it.

          It just means that you shouldn't put more than 100V across it. It should
          conduct when you apply 5V to the gate.

          Leon



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        • drbillpmt@aol.com
          This type of Mosfet needs sustantial gate drive. Usually you would have to use somethings like a 4429 to drive it. You can t use logic level signals.
          Message 4 of 12 , Feb 2, 2005
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            This type of Mosfet needs sustantial gate drive. Usually you would have to use somethings like a 4429 to drive it. You can't use logic level signals. International Rectifier has an ap note on calculating the drive requirements.
             
            Just on a guess (from designing with the IRF6040N, you might need about 10 Ohms series resistor and over 100 MA current.
             
            Dr. Bill
          • upand_at_them
            Well, then this is weird. I have the gate at 5V, the drain at 5V, and the source at GND. I get confused about drain/source so I also tried it with the drain
            Message 5 of 12 , Feb 2, 2005
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              Well, then this is weird. I have the gate at 5V, the drain at 5V,
              and the source at GND. I get confused about drain/source so I also
              tried it with the drain at GND and source at 5V. No flow.

              Mike

              --- In Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com, "Leon Heller"
              <leon.heller@d...> wrote:
              > It just means that you shouldn't put more than 100V across it. It
              should
              > conduct when you apply 5V to the gate.
              >
              > Leon
            • upand_at_them
              But it s touted as having a logic level gate voltage. It was even suggested by Randy of Glitchbuster. Mike ... have to ... signals. ... requirements. ...
              Message 6 of 12 , Feb 2, 2005
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                But it's touted as having a logic level gate voltage. It was even
                suggested by Randy of Glitchbuster.

                Mike


                --- In Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com, drbillpmt@a... wrote:
                > This type of Mosfet needs sustantial gate drive. Usually you would
                have to
                > use somethings like a 4429 to drive it. You can't use logic level
                signals.
                > International Rectifier has an ap note on calculating the drive
                requirements.
                >
                > Just on a guess (from designing with the IRF6040N, you might need
                about 10
                > Ohms series resistor and over 100 MA current.
                >
                > Dr. Bill
              • smartdim@aol.com
                In a message dated 2005/02/02 6:21:45 Pacific Standard Time, upand_at_them@yahoo.com writes: But it s touted as having a logic level gate voltage. It was
                Message 7 of 12 , Feb 2, 2005
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                  In a message dated 2005/02/02 6:21:45 Pacific Standard Time, upand_at_them@... writes:

                  But it's touted as having a logic level gate voltage.  It was even
                  suggested by Randy of Glitchbuster.

                  Mike
                  -------------------------------------------
                   
                  You either "popped" it, have it hooked up wrong, bad connection.......
                   
                  I have been using that beast for quite some time, from switching very low currents (like an led to test it) to amps.
                   
                  Have not had a lick of trouble.
                   
                  Can you post a drawing of how you have it connected?
                • upand_at_them
                  Oops. Dumb mistake. Had the power hooked up backwards. I have a breadboard power supply with headers that push into the breadboard. And the breadboard power
                  Message 8 of 12 , Feb 2, 2005
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                    Oops. Dumb mistake. Had the power hooked up backwards. I have a
                    breadboard power supply with headers that push into the breadboard.
                    And the breadboard power strip has blue on the inside for one side
                    and blue on the outside for the other. Wasn't the first time I've
                    made that mistake.

                    -Mike


                    --- In Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com, "upand_at_them"
                    <upand_at_them@y...> wrote:
                    >
                    > How the heck does the IRL520N MOSFET work? I have it on a
                    breadboard
                    > and can't get it to switch on.
                    >
                    > According to the datasheet the Drain-to-Source breakdown voltage is
                    > 100V. Does this mean it won't conduct below that? I thought this
                    > was just a regular MOSFET with a logic-level gate. I'm trying to
                    > switch 5V through an LED to test it.
                    >
                    > Mike
                  • Randy Jones
                    Mike, you are correct. They work beautifully with logic-level inputs from digital ICs such as 74HCxx and microcontrollers like PICs, etc. Essentially no
                    Message 9 of 12 , Feb 2, 2005
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                      Mike, you are correct. They work beautifully with logic-level inputs from
                      digital ICs such as 74HCxx and microcontrollers like PICs, etc.

                      Essentially no current is required to the gate once the small gate
                      capacitance is charged. The gate capacitance would only be a consideration
                      with high frequency switching. If your load is not being turned on and off
                      at high frequencies, then you don't need to be concerned with this.

                      When these devices are turned on, they present a very low resistance in the
                      load circuit. There is no minimum current that must be flowing through the
                      load. You can use them to switch a few mA (or less) if you want, although
                      cheaper TO-92 transistors like the 2N3904, PN2222, or 2N4401 are fine for
                      those kinds of loads.

                      Where these guys really shine is when you are switching more load current
                      than those little TO-92 jobs can handle -- say, over 150 to 200 mA. You
                      don't have to calculate base resistors as you would with conventional BJT
                      transistors, and there is no inherent voltage drop as with Darlingtons such
                      as the TIP120, etc.

                      I've done apples-to-apples testing with the IRL520N vs. the TIP120, and the
                      TIP120 had much higher voltage drop and temperature rise -- both of which
                      are not good. So your load gets more of the available power with the
                      IRL520N, instead of wasting it as heat in the transistor. In some cases,
                      you might need a heat sink with the TIP120, but would not with the IRL520N.

                      If you need even more load current or need a lower "on" resistance, you can
                      move up to the IRL530N or IRL540N. The IRL540N can switch up to 36 amps
                      continuous with a decent heat sink -- controlled by a logic level signal
                      from a digital IC.

                      These MOSFETs also have a spike suppression diode built in, which eliminates
                      the need to use one on an inductive load in many cases. I have used them to
                      drive automotive fuel injectors drawing approx. 1.0 amp and also with
                      automotive relays without a spike suppression diode. No problems at all.

                      Regulars on this list might remember a discussion several months ago where
                      someone was repairing a pinball machine and was having no luck with NPNs and
                      NPN darlingtons controlling his solenoids. He ordered some IRL520Ns and
                      they worked perfectly.

                      These things are the closest to a "no brainer" transistor to switch
                      substantial loads from digital logic that I've ever seen. When using them
                      instead of a NPN to switch the ground side of a load, connect the source to
                      ground, the drain to one side of the load, and the gate to the signal
                      source. The other side of the load is connected to its positive supply.

                      In some cases it may be useful to connect a resistor between the gate and
                      source to keep the device off when an input signal is not present.
                      Something in the 10k to 100k range will generally work fine. Some designers
                      also like to place a resistor in series between the gate and input signal to
                      reduce the chance of oscillation. Common values are in the 50 to 100 ohm
                      range, and it should be mounted as close to the gate as possible.

                      Have fun!

                      -Randy
                      www.glitchbuster.com



                      >
                      >
                      > But it's touted as having a logic level gate voltage. It was even
                      > suggested by Randy of Glitchbuster.
                      >
                      > Mike
                      >
                      >
                      > --- In Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com, drbillpmt@a... wrote:
                      > > This type of Mosfet needs sustantial gate drive. Usually you would
                      > have to
                      > > use somethings like a 4429 to drive it. You can't use logic level
                      > signals.
                      > > International Rectifier has an ap note on calculating the drive
                      > requirements.
                      > >
                      > > Just on a guess (from designing with the IRF6040N, you might need
                      > about 10
                      > > Ohms series resistor and over 100 MA current.
                      > >
                      > > Dr. Bill
                    • Randy Jones
                      ... Actually, they work great with logic level signals -- that s the significance of the L in the part number... These MOSFETs -- IRL520N, IRL530N, and
                      Message 10 of 12 , Feb 2, 2005
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                        >> You can't use logic level signals. <<
                         
                        Actually, they work great with logic level signals -- that's the significance of the "L" in the part number...
                         
                        These MOSFETs -- IRL520N, IRL530N, and IRL540N -- are specifically designed to work with logic level signals -- and they work very well.  I and many of my customers routinely drive them with signals from microcontrollers and digital ICs.  They turn on nicely with those signals, and present a very low "on" resistance. 
                         
                        Naturally, if you're switching them at higher frequencies you'll need to take the gate capacitance and the impedance of the signal source into consideration. 
                         
                        There is no minimum load current.  They can be used from the maximum rated current (10 amps for the IRL520N) down to as low as you want.  With load currents below 150-200 mA or so, a TO-92 device would be more cost effective, but the IRL520N would also do the job just fine. 
                         
                        At just .67 each in singles, the IRL520N is a delightful solution to many switching applications.
                         
                        -Randy
                         
                         
                        ----- Original Message -----
                        Sent: Wednesday, February 02, 2005 6:09 AM
                        Subject: Re: [Electronics_101] IRL520N

                        This type of Mosfet needs sustantial gate drive. Usually you would have to use somethings like a 4429 to drive it. You can't use logic level signals. International Rectifier has an ap note on calculating the drive requirements.
                         
                        Just on a guess (from designing with the IRF6040N, you might need about 10 Ohms series resistor and over 100 MA current.
                         
                        Dr. Bill
                      • smartdim@aol.com
                        In a message dated 2005/02/02 22:44:37 Pacific Standard Time, randyjones@worldnet.att.net writes: These MOSFETs -- IRL520N, IRL530N, and IRL540N -- are
                        Message 11 of 12 , Feb 3, 2005
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                          In a message dated 2005/02/02 22:44:37 Pacific Standard Time, randyjones@... writes:
                          These MOSFETs -- IRL520N, IRL530N, and IRL540N -- are specifically designed to work with logic level signals -- and they work very well.  I and many of my customers routinely drive them with signals from microcontrollers and digital ICs.  They turn on nicely with those signals, and present a very low "on" resistance. 
                          --------------------------
                           
                          Yep,
                           
                          Randy speaks the truth as I am one of the customers he speaks of.....I routinely drive the IRL's with the Scenix SX micro and Basic Stamps.
                           
                          K
                        • smartdim@aol.com
                          In a message dated 2005/02/02 22:20:07 Pacific Standard Time, randyjones@worldnet.att.net writes: Regulars on this list might remember a discussion several
                          Message 12 of 12 , Feb 3, 2005
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                            In a message dated 2005/02/02 22:20:07 Pacific Standard Time, randyjones@... writes:
                            Regulars on this list might remember a discussion several months ago where
                            someone was repairing a pinball machine and was having no luck with NPNs and
                            NPN darlingtons controlling his solenoids.  He ordered some IRL520Ns and
                            they worked perfectly.
                            -------------------------------
                             
                            Yes I remember.....
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