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Re: [Electronics_101] Re: Stepper Drivers / steppers

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  • Stefan Trethan
    ... Yea many of the old 5.25 have cube motors in there which are the full height of the drive. the head is moved directly via spring steel coiled around a
    Message 1 of 55 , May 2, 2004
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      >
      > The old 5.25 floppies had a neat heavy duty looking motor, but it is
      > really small.
      >

      Yea many of the old 5.25 have "cube motors" in there which are the full
      height of the drive.
      the head is moved directly via spring steel coiled around a ~~1cm pulley.
      they must have small steps to make this work.

      I have also seen several other designs, with spindles mostly.

      ST
    • Chris
      Jan is right, ! ... From: JanRwl@AOL.COM To: Electronics_101@yahoogroups.com Sent: Tuesday, May 04, 2004 2:06 PM Subject: Re: [Electronics_101] Re: Stepper
      Message 55 of 55 , May 4, 2004
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        Jan is right, !
         
        ----- Original Message -----
        Sent: Tuesday, May 04, 2004 2:06 PM
        Subject: Re: [Electronics_101] Re: Stepper Drivers / steppers

        In a message dated 5/4/2004 1:09:50 AM Central Standard Time, stefan_trethan@... writes:
        No, to be serious, you actually HAVE decimal inches?   i mean you have scales on machines dividing an inch in 10 parts and that's it?
         
        Yes, ST, [Almost?] All American machine-tools (lathes, milling-machines, surface-grinders, etc., have index-wheels graduated in thousandths and hundredths of the inch.  I have NEVER seen any machine-tool with handwheel-indexes graduated in fractions.  "Fractional inches" are used only for carpentry and gardening, here in the USA!  The "inch" is the standard of metalworking measure, here.  Lately, however, SOME machines will have DUAL-index-markings, one being metric, in addition to the decimal-inch markings.  Generally, one turn of an index-wheel makes a 0.200 inch linear move, but on the X-wheel on the lathes, this is generally only a 0.100 inch move per turn. 
         
        I have a Taiwanese lathe (330 mm swing x 1 meter between-centers) with 0.825 inch per turn of the Z handwheel; this is 20.955 mm.  I have NEVER figured out why that particular move is neither one full inch, or 20 or 25 mm per turn!  It is sometimes maddening to try to "measure" via the index on that handwheel!  But, it being Taiwanese, the "price was right", so I will not complain TOO loudly!  It is not used to make optical devices!
         
        But know!  The CNC lathe I built (all by myself!) in 2000 has METRIC lead-screws, and I had to write the programs in mm. increments!  NO problem!  We Americans are not ALL looney!
         
        Jan Rowland
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