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The military draft is coming!!!

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  • a_cascadian
    The military draft is coming!!! Well I think anyone that saw the presidential debates heard and saw Mr Bush say there will not be a military draft (yeah
    Message 1 of 2 , Nov 19, 2004
      The military draft is coming!!!

      Well I think anyone that saw the presidential debates heard and saw Mr
      Bush say "there will not be a military draft" (yeah right). Well if
      you read the articles below then I think you would realize Mr Bush
      bold face lies left and right. From lawyars looking into whether the
      selective service lists are up dated to the potential of a military
      draft of medics. Say to your brothers, sons, young fathers and young
      male friends I will see you on the frontlines of Iran. Read for yourself:

      __________


      Government looking at military draft lists

      By ALMA WALZER
      The Monitor

      McALLEN, November 15, 2004 — It's taken one year, seven months and 19
      days of combat in Iraq for the Lone Star State to lose 100 of its own.

      Texas is the second state, after California, to lose 100 service
      members, according to The Associated Press.

      With continuing war in Iraq and U.S. armed forces dispersed to so many
      other locations around the globe, Americans may be wondering if
      compulsory military service could begin again for the first time since
      the Vietnam War era.

      The Selective Service System (SSS) and the U.S. Department of
      Education now are gearing up to compare their computer records, to
      make sure all men between the ages of 18 and 25 who are required to
      register for a military draft have done so.

      The SSS and the education department will begin comparing their lists
      on Jan. 1, 2005, according to a memo authored by Jack Martin, acting
      Selective Service director.

      While similar record checks have been done periodically for the past
      10 years, Martin's memo is dated Oct. 28, just a few days before the
      Nov. 2 presidential election, a hard-fought campaign in which the
      question of whether the nation might need to reinstate a military
      draft was raised in debates and on the stump.

      It took several more days, until Nov. 4, for the document to reach the
      Federal Register, the official daily publication for rules and notices
      of federal agencies and organizations.

      The memo was also produced after the U.S. House voted 402-2 on Oct. 5,
      against House Resolution 163, a bill that would have required all
      young people, including women, to serve two years of military service.

      Under federal law, a military draft cannot be started without
      congressional support.

      About 94 percent of all men are properly registered for a draft,
      according to Richard Flahavan, associate director of the office of
      public and intergovernmental affairs for SSS.

      Martin's memo is just a routine thing, Flahavan said.

      "Back in 1982 a federal law was passed that basically linked federal
      grants, student loans and federal assistance to students with
      Selective Service," Flahavan said. "You had to register with Selective
      Service with a Social Security number (in order to receive federal
      assistance), and as a consequence of the law the Department of
      Education came up with an agreement on how to exchange and compare
      data to comply with the law.

      "It just so happens that the current agreement in effect expires next
      month," Flahavan said. "All we did is update the agreement slightly,
      but it has no substantive changes. There is nothing new or shocking to
      link this to some type of draft right around the corner because its
      all been in place for almost 18 years."

      Flahavan said the written agreements between SSS and the Department of
      Education normally run for about four or five years and suggested that
      a reporter search the 1999 or 2000 records of the Federal Register for
      the most agreement.

      A search of the Federal Register by The Monitor found four such
      agreements between the two agencies, with effective dates as follows:
      Jan. 1, 1995; July 1, 1997; Jan. 1, 2000; and July 1, 2002.

      All four agreements lasted for 18 months, during which time the SSS
      and the Department of Education could complete their comparisons.

      The most recent agreement, which began July 1, 2002, actually expired
      Jan. 1, 2004, according to federal records located by The Monitor.

      "This has nothing to with current events," Flahavan said. "This is
      just the periodic renewal of previous agreements — this one is 18
      months but normally it runs four years and that's why we're doing it
      now. I'm not quite sure why it's 18 months versus the normal number of
      years."

      Flahavan said the agency was required to place the agreement in the
      Federal Register.

      "That's fine and we did," Flahavan said. "We believe the public
      wouldn't stand for a draft that isn't fair and equitable.

      "And the only way to be fair and equitable is if everyone who should
      register is registered, because that's the pool from which the people
      who would be drafted would be selected from. So you want everyone who
      should be in the pot in the pot," Flahavan said.

      U.S. Rep. Lloyd Doggett, D-Austin, who officially begins representing
      western Hidalgo County residents in January, said Congress has voted
      on record against a draft.

      "It was a near unanimous vote in the House," Doggett said. "When
      things are filed in the Federal Register, there will be standards, and
      they are a reminder that if we cannot get more international
      participation that the risk of a draft remains out there.

      "And I think we do need people to remain watchful of this possibility."

      Doggett said one type of "draft" was already being used by the military.

      "I'm concerned that a very real form of the draft is there now for
      those already in the service," Doggett said. "People are being forced
      to stay in beyond their commitment, and that's an indication of being
      overextended.

      "I want us to pursue policies that don't overextend us and involve
      more international participation, so that Americans don't have to do
      all the dying and endure all the pain for these international
      activities," Doggett said.

      Flahavan said the computer records check would help Selective Service
      with its compliance rates.

      "From 1999 to 2000, it was dropping about a percent a year," Flahavan
      said. "It's now inching back up about a percent a year. Last year it
      was 93 percent.

      "At the end of 2004 we anticipate about a 94 percent compliance rate,"
      Flahavan said. "We're pleased we've got it back on the rise and that's
      where we want to keep it — that's our goal."

      Draft Gear Up?
      Who Has To Register?
      All male U.S. citizens and male aliens living in the U.S. between the
      ages of 18 and 25
      Dual nationals of the U.S. and another country, regardless of where
      they live
      Young men who are in prison or mental institutions do not have to
      regsiter while they are committed, but must do so if they are released
      and not reached age 26
      Disabled men who live at home and can move about indiependently.
      Myths
      Contrary to popular belief, only sons and the last son to carry a
      family name must register and they can be drafted.
      What Happens In A Draft
      Congress would likely approve a military draft in a time of crisis, in
      which the mission requires more troops than are in the volunteer military.
      Selective Service procedures would treat married men or those with
      children the same as single men.
      The first men to be called up will be those whose 20th birthday falls
      during that year, followed by those age 21, 22, 23,24 and 25.
      The last men to be called are 18 and 19 years of age.
      Historical Facts
      The last man to be drafted was in June 1973.
      Number of Drafted for WWI : 2.8 million
      Number of Drafted for WWII: 10 million
      Number of Drafted for the Korean War: 1.5 million
      Number of Drafted for the Vietnam War: 1.8 million
      Source: Selective Service System

      http://www.brownsvilleherald.com/ts_more.php?id=62232_0_10_0_C

      __________

      For driver's license, La boys preregister for Selective Service
      11/13/2004, 2:19 p.m. CT
      The Associated Press

      ALEXANDRIA, La. (AP) — When Larry Chevalier took his son to get his
      first driver's license, he was floored to discover that to get it, the
      boy had to preregister for a nonexistent military draft.

      "I just can't believe it," said Chevalier, whose 16-year-old son,
      Nathan, did fill out the form to register with the Selective Service
      so he could get his license.

      "They wouldn't let him get it otherwise," Chevalier said Saturday.

      Even a 15-year-old boy who wants a learner's permit in Louisiana must
      provide information to be forwarded, when he turns 18, to the
      Selective Service System, which would run a military draft if one is
      set up again.

      The same goes for any 16- 17- or 18-year-old who wants his — the law
      applies only to males — first driver's license or state ID card.

      "They can't even be a conscientious objector to signing up," said
      Chevalier, of Glenmora.

      The state forwards the information to a federal center which holds it
      until the boy's 18th birthday, when he is old enough to enter military
      service. It is used to automatically register him with Selective Service.

      Nobody much noticed the law when the Legislature passed it in 2003.
      What got people's attention that year was a law to suspend the
      licenses of some students expelled or suspended from high school.

      Rudy Sanchez, general counsel for the federal Selective Service
      System, was also floored to learn that 15-year-olds were being asked
      to preregister. "Louisiana shouldn't be registering 15-year-olds. We
      don't even register 16-year-olds," he said last week.

      Federal law only provides for "early submission" of information by a
      young man who is at least 17 years and three months old, he noted.
      When he turns 18, it is forwarded to the proper database.

      The law requires only that young men register within 30 days before or
      after their 18th birthdays.

      Other states have passed laws requiring young men to register with
      Selective Service when they get a driver's license, but none requires
      it of 15-year-olds, he said.

      Everett Bonner, state director of Selective Service, said information
      collected by the Office of Motor Vehicles is forwarded to a federal
      data management center in Chicago.

      "They do accept it. I can promise you. They do not process it until
      the young man turns 18," he said.

      He said registering young men when they get their drivers' licenses is
      a convenience and a way to help those who don't know they must
      register. Anyone failing to register is "considered a felon without
      conviction," he said, and may lose opportunities and benefits.

      Chevalier questioned how the state can force a minor child to "sign on
      the dotted line" without his parents' consent.

      Bonner said parents must sign for a minor to get a driver's license
      and that should suffice for draft registration as well.

      "What I don't like is somebody having all this information about kids
      and somebody sitting up there in some private meeting discussing how
      many young people they have available for the draft in two years,"
      Chevalier said.

      There is no national military draft, and the major presidential
      candidates all said repeatedly that they don't plan to reinstate one.

      Chevalier said he himself was "too young for Vietnam and too old for
      anything afterward," but his family has a tradition of military
      service. "Somebody in my family has served in every war since the
      Revolutionary War," he said.

      It doesn't bother him that his son would have to sign up with
      Selective Service when he turns 18. "But to be signing up kids at 15
      and 16 years old, I do have a problem with that," he said. "All this
      is to where the government can get a closer eye on the kids. I really
      believe it's going against their civil liberties."

      The bill's sponsor was Hunt Downer, an assistant adjutant general in
      the National Guard and former House speaker whom Gov. Kathleen Blanco
      appointed in August to head the new Department of Veterans Affairs.

      Young men at a recent YMCA-sponsored driver's education course
      shrugged when they learned of the requirement.

      "I don't care," said Mark Fontenot, a 16-year-old student at Apostolic
      Christian Academy.

      Pineville High School student Josh Stokes, 15, said, "I think it's good.'

      Neither would elaborate.

      "I think it's all right. I can't do anything about it anyway," said
      Stephen White, 16 and a student at Alexandria Senior High School.

      Chevalier said he plans to do something, or at least try. He plans to
      submit a report to the American Civil Liberties Union, and is putting
      together information packets to send to all state legislators.

      "They said it was to make it easier on an 18-year-old. How can they
      say it makes it easier on an 18-year-old when it's putting more
      pressure on a 15-year-old?" he said.

      http://www.nola.com/newsflash/louisiana/index.ssf?/base/news-12/1100377441110120.xml&storylist=louisiana

      __________

      Draft remains in the mind of the nation
      By Alexander Plummer
      Published: Friday, November 19, 2004


      Two weeks removed from another hotly contested presidential election,
      all eyes are now focused on 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue, as President
      George W. Bush begins to shape his political agenda for his upcoming
      second term. Questions abound on what policies the president will
      pursue, and what actions he will take now that the country has given
      the former Texas governor a slight but clear mandate.

      Among the many issues that have been bandied about as possible items
      on Bush's second term agenda, the reinstatement of a draft has become
      more than just a debate among Americans across the county. With U.S.
      troops facing increasingly hostile resistance in Iraq, and the
      everyday strain being put on our human resources overseas, a draft
      could be in our near future.

      In the final months before the election, the issue of a draft received
      little play from the news media, but the issue was still a topic for
      both George Bush and John Kerry.

      "Sen. Kerry did raise the issue," former Kerry advisor and close
      confidant to the Massachusetts senator Setti Warren said. " He
      stressed the fact that he thought there was a back door draft going on."

      Warren believes that the reason the draft has become an issue in the
      first place has to do with the fact that "our reservists are having to
      come back out to fight, and the sheer numbers and strain on our
      military could lead to a draft."

      "Sen. Kerry, on many occasions during the campaign, pounded home his
      belief that our troops were not being equipped to the appropriate
      level of fighting in Iraq," Warren stated. She also recalled that the
      issue of a draft was " high on the list of the Kerry agenda," during
      the campaign.

      On the other side of the spectrum, President Bush on the campaign
      trail was quoted as saying that "our all-volunteer army will remain an
      all-volunteer army." Bush went on to assure the American people that
      "we will not have a draft, and the only person talking about the draft
      is my opponent. The only politicians that supported a draft are
      Democrats, and the best way to avoid a draft is to vote for me."

      http://www.tnhonline.com/news/2004/11/19/News/Draft.Remains.In.The.Mind.Of.The.Nation-811984.shtml

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      _______-

      The Coming Draft - Skills & Combat

      This is a Special Military Draft Alert.

      In May, the Seattle Post Intelligencer published an article about a
      document they received through the Freedom of Information Act. It was
      revealed that the SSS is currently "designing procedures" for the
      implementation of a "Skills Draft" and had held a top-level meeting on
      it with Deputy Undersecretaries at the Defense Department. This draft
      would change the essential mission of the Selective Service and
      require "virtually every young American," male and female ages 18–34,
      to register for the Skills Draft and list all the occupations they are
      proficient in to fill labor shortages throughout nearly the entire
      government. If enacted, the Skills Draft proposed in this FOI-
      recovered document would change America as we know it.

      The Pentagon is suffering from immediate labor shortages. Recently,
      the inactive Ready Reserve had to be called up for the first time
      since the Gulf War to fill 5,600 job shortages in the Armed Forces.
      DoD said in the recent IRR callup "20% of the call-ups are truck
      drivers, 12% are supply specialists who can use a computer to track
      supplies, 10% are Humvee mechanics, 7% are administrative specialists
      and 6% are combat engineers" (USA Today, August 8, 2004).

      Although Congress would have to approve new legislation to create a
      Skills Draft or reinstate the combat draft, Family Circle reported in
      its July 13 issue that Karl Rove had polled GOP members of Congress in
      September 2002 to see if they would support the President if he
      requests reinstatement. The Republicans said they would vote for the
      draft. They would likely support the new legislation needed to create
      the Skills Draft. While Bush and the Republicans are of course keeping
      the return of the draft and the new skills draft as quiet as possible,
      many anti-draft organizations have recently begun warning of a "Coming
      New Draft. "

      The Issue Paper document was revealed through the Freedom of
      Information Act by Seattle Post Intelligencer reporter Eric Rosenberg,
      who wrote a partial explanation of it that was printed May 1, 2004.

      Rosenberg's article was edited, however, and some key points about
      this document were omitted in the published article. What follows is a
      full explanation of the document.

      This document is real, having been acknowledged by the DoD and the SSS
      when they said no action is being taken on it at the present time.
      However, given the current manpower shortages for certain skills and
      nurses, if Bush gets back in, expect all the options outlined in the
      Issue Paper to be implemented by the end of December of this year, and
      at the least a non-combat skills and medical draft to start next year,
      if not the male combat draft, ages 18 –25.

      Despite Rumsfeld saying the draft is not needed, this is the same
      neo-con administration that has repeatedly lied to and misled the
      American people. Draft-age youth and their families are left looking
      at a "long, hard slog" in Iraq (Rumsfeld secret memo), the neo-con
      plans to invade still more nations, and then having to take Rumsfeld
      and Cheney's word not to worry about the draft, that they "are not
      considering it at this time."

      Although official word is that this secret list of options is not
      being implemented—the Issue Paper options have NOT been rejected and
      the 6-page proposal is rather sitting in the Pentagon, waiting. In
      addition, the SSS itself has said that it is "designing procedures"
      (Seattle PI, May 1, 2004) to implement the skills draft, meaning
      designing the compliance cards and the data fields needed to keep
      track of "virtually every young American" and their skills. Acting
      Director of the SSS Brodsky has also said the Skills Draft is the "top
      priority" of the Selective Service for 2004.

      From the FOI document, we now know that on February 11, 2003, Charles
      Abell, the Deputy Undersecretary of Defense for Personnel and
      Readiness, and William Carr, Deputy Undersecretary for Military
      Personnel Policy, met with Lewis Brodsky, the Acting Director of the
      Selective Service and some other officials. This is the highest-level
      meeting you could have about the Selective Service, outside of
      Rumsfeld and his inner circle. They were there to discuss the urgent
      "issue paper" now revealed, which starts: "With known shortages of
      military personnel with certain critical skills, and with the need for
      the nation to be capable of responding to domestic emergencies as a
      part of Homeland Security Planning, changes should be made in the
      Selective Service System's registration program and primary mission."

      Although it would require changes in current draft law, the
      far-reaching proposal shows how far the Republicans are going to plan
      and prepare for a huge expansion of the draft. The Issue Paper options
      include: Change the very mission of the SSS to become a massive
      conscription service in the War on Terror for the entire government.
      Conscript men and women in a critical skills non-combat draft up to
      age 34 with no deferments of any kind, except "essential community
      service" (like the Medical Draft). Allow a non-combat draft for
      shortages in critical skills, without calling a combat draft. Fill
      labor shortages of all kinds throughout not only DoD but the whole
      government, especially high-paying professionals like computer
      networking specialist or linguist. Create a massive database of
      "virtually every young American" ages 18 to 34. This database would be
      used to draft in war and to recruit in peacetime. State and even local
      governments would be given access to the names for recruitment and
      help in emergencies. Create a single-point, all-inclusive database, in
      which every young person would be forced to send in a
      "self-declaration" of all of their critical skills, chosen from a long
      list of occupations like the Armed Forces Specialty Code. The
      self-declaration is similar to IRS compliance and the filling out and
      signing of your tax forms. All young people would be required to keep
      the government updated if they acquired a new skill. SSS Compliance
      forms will be available at every Post Office. The usual penalties of
      imprisonment and/or a $250,000 fine would apply to all
      non-registrants. A draft or recruitment could be for any one of the
      skills you self- declare on the compliance form, not your current or
      primary skill. This greatly increases your chance of being drafted if
      you are 18–34. Bring the Medical Draft (HCPDS) up to speed and fully
      test it through readiness exercises. Reduce induction time from being
      able to deliver all inductees in 193 days down to just 90 days for
      skills inductees.

      This secret paper urges the mission be changed "promptly," meaning
      they really need it, it would draft for the Pentagon as well as the
      enormous Homeland Security branches as well as other government
      agencies, even state and local!

      For obvious political reasons, the decision was made by Bush, Cheney
      and Rove to sit on this 6-page proposal until after the election in
      November. Yet the SSS was told to go ahead and begin "designing
      procedures" for the Skills Draft in 2004 and make it their "top
      priority." It can be expected that if Bush gets back in, and the DoD
      and SSS are still asking for the Skills Draft, the "Next Steps" part
      of the document will be put into action and the most expansive option
      to change the SSS mission will be rapidly legislated.

      In the secret planning meeting document, the next steps strongly
      recommended by SSS Acting Director Brodsky were:

      1. "Promptly" redefine the SSS Mission to draft men and women up to
      age 34 for skills, and deliver them within 90 days or sooner to the
      Department of Defense. Program a massive database to be ready to enter
      millions of names of those registering their critical skills.

      2. Expand mission to deliver personnel in skills draft to the
      Department of Homeland Security and other agencies, including FEMA,
      NSC, Border Patrol, INS, Customs, Corporation for National Service,
      Public Health Service and other federal, state and local government
      agencies.

      3. Form interagency task force to provide Administration with
      recommendation on this skills draft for the entire DHS and the rest of
      the government.

      4. Obtain White House Statement of Administration Policy on the future
      of the SSS.

      5. Be prepared to market the skills draft, raising the non-combat age
      to 34 and the drafting of women to the Armed Services and
      Appropriations Committee.

      This proposed expansion of the draft, forcing all people under 35 to
      register with the SSS, man or woman, is primarily proposed, according
      to the document, because the cost of providing contract professionals,
      like computer network specialists, would be "prohibitive." In this
      way, the proposed Skills Draft would help preserve Bush's massive tax
      cuts for the wealthy by lowering the massive budget deficits.

      That's the new Skills Draft and the secret document behind it. But
      what about the Combat Draft?

      Selective Service has been registering young men for over twenty years
      and at any moment the President can go to Congress and ask them to
      reauthorize conscription for the male combat draft for ages 18–25. It
      doesn't take much to imagine a re-elected Bush going to Congress and
      saying "We cannot cut and run from Iraq or the War on Terror. I need
      you to reauthorize conscription."

      And they would not have to pass a whole new draft law to do it. All
      that is needed is a "trigger resolution," which could be passed in the
      dead of night—and bingo! No debate, no regular bill, just a short
      resolution passed quickly and the draft for men 18 to 25 is back.

      That is why the Democratic draft resolution being offered by Rangel
      and Hollings is totally irrelevant. These are known protest bills and
      actually propose drafting women for the combat draft, just to make
      sure they will never see the light of day. Rangel and Hollings offered
      them to raise the issue and confront Bush. Hollings even said he
      wouldn't vote for his own bill!

      They are not needed—and the press and the Republicans will bring them
      up as red herrings to distract everyone from what is really going on:
      the Republicans, and the SSS are quietly, behind the scenes, oiling up
      the draft machinery—getting ready to reinstate for the Spring of 2005.
      Taken singly, each of the clues indicating the return and expansion of
      the draft might seem insignificant but when you add them all up with
      what the Selective Service is doing to gear up the combat draft, a
      clear pattern emerges, leading to the inescapable conclusion that a
      Bush re-election will see not only a Skills Draft, but a return of the
      Combat Draft as well.

      What is the proof? The government's own document, the SSS Performance
      Plan for Fiscal Year 2004.

      The Selective Service System, or the SSS, has for decades operated at
      a low level of readiness. Readiness Exercises are conducted on a
      multi-year cycle but historically these have been little more than
      getting draft board volunteers together and going over the procedures
      of what would happen under reinstatement and training new members
      every summer. And the draft boards themselves have become 80% vacant
      over the decades.

      In the current 5-year cycle of exercises, however, the SSS is clearly
      ramping up the draft machinery to an unprecedented level.

      "Strategic Objective 1.2: Ensure a mobilization infrastructure of 56
      State Headquarters, 442 Area Offices and 1,980 Local Boards are
      operational within 75 days of an authorized return to conscription."

      Tie that to this objective:

      An annual report providing the results of the implementation of these
      performance measures will be submitted by March 31, 2005.

      75 days from March 31, 2005 is about June 15, 2005. According to the
      2004 plan, the draft boards will be "operational" then, meaning that
      they will be set up in 1,980 local offices around the country. If Bush
      asks for reinstatement on April 1, Congress could pass it that night
      and the first batch of more than one million 20 year-olds would face
      the national lottery as soon as that date, June 15, 2005.

      Here is how the $28 million is being spent according to the official
      document. Although the Senate rejected the funding request to bump up
      the SSS budget to $28 million, the SSS says in one paragraph of the
      Performance Plan that budgets will be "adjusted" to cover the
      additional cost for 2004:

      Strategic Goal 1: Increase the effectiveness and efficiency of the
      Manpower Delivery Systems (Projected allocation for FY 2004: $7,942,000)

      Strategic Goal 2: Improve overall Registration Compliance and Service
      to the Public (Projected allocation FY 2004: $8,769,000)

      Strategic Goal 3: Enhance external and internal customer service
      (Projected allocation for FY 2004: $10 ,624,000)

      Strategic Goal 4: Enhance the system which guarantees that each
      conscientious objector is properly classified, placed, and monitored.
      (Projected allocation for FY 2004: $955,000)

      In analyzing each of the 2004 goals in detail it is obvious that there
      are hidden "activation bombshells" in this so-called Performance Plan.
      Goal number 1 in particular brings the combat induction process up to
      95% operational readiness, going so far as to actually hold a mock
      lottery drawing this year and to issue sample orders to report for the
      famous medical exam. The document does not reveal the day in 2004 the
      mock lottery is to be held.

      In addition, the Medical Draft, or Health Care Personnel Delivery
      System (HCPDS in the document), is for the first time brought up to
      full readiness by next year. This draft would take men and women up to
      age 44 if they are doctors, nurses or one of 60-some medical
      specialties. No medical deferments allowed. Previous readiness
      exercises merely went over what would happen with HCPDS and updated
      the guide. The 2004 plan actually develops a readiness exercise for
      the Medical Draft that would be conducted next year. Plus HCPDS must
      be ready to conscript by June, being part of the system.

      Goal number four is particularly ominous:

      Strategic Objective 4.1: Ensure a mobilization infrastructure of 48
      Alternative Service Offices and 48 Civilian Review Boards are
      operational within 96 days after notification of a return to induction.

      Strategic Objective 4.2: Develop a Standard Operating Procedure (SOP)
      for the Alternative Service Employer Network to specifically identify
      organizations and associations who can, by law, participate in the
      Alternative Service Program. This network will provide jobs for ASWs
      at the local level. Prior to activation, SSS will develop a draft MOU
      for use when obtaining agreements with qualified employers at the
      local and national level.

      For 31 years, the Conscientious Objector system, called the
      Alternative Service, has lain dormant. The 2004 plan also calls for
      this to be brought up to speed and to be ready to decide cases and
      place COs in the Alternative Service by July 6, 2005 (96 days after
      March 31, 2005). The SSS is even going so far as to draw up the SOPs,
      the Standard Operating Procedures which identify local employers
      eligible to receive cheap AS workers and to also draw up the actual
      MOU, the Memorandum of Understanding the employer must sign to get
      their CO workers and allow their mandatory attendance to be monitored.
      This is the last obstacle to be hurdled before the draft could
      actually be ready for quick activation under the law.

      In sharp contrast to all this preparation for a Spring 2005 draft by
      Bush, Democratic Presidential candidate John Kerry has proposed a
      military plan that rejects any draft, by adding 20,000 active duty
      combat soldiers and 20,000 active "reconstruction specialists." At a
      Wisconsin high school, Kerry pledged in June, 2004, that the draft
      would be "absolutely unnecessary." When asked in April by 130 college
      editors in a conference call as to whether he would support a draft,
      John Kerry said unequivocally: "No. No draft" and he has criticized
      the use of the Guard and Reserve and now the Individual Ready Reserve
      as a "back-door draft."

      Kerry plans to spend an additional $7 billion to strengthen the
      Volunteer Army in what is essentially a "No-Draft Plan," Moreover,
      Kerry is strongly opposed to the neo-con plan revealed in Wes Clark's
      book, in which Clark was told by a senior Pentagon official that
      invasions of Syria, Lebanon, Iran, Sudan and Somalia are still to come
      over the next three years.




      ___________

      Secret report details plan to draft medics

      By Robert Pear The New York Times

      Wednesday, October 20, 2004


      WASHINGTONThe Selective Service has been updating its contingency
      plans for a draft of doctors, nurses and other health care workers in
      case of a national emergency that overwhelmed the military's medical
      corps.
      .In a confidential report this summer, a contractor hired by the
      agency described how such a draft might work, how to secure compliance
      and how to mold public opinion and communicate with health care
      professionals, whose lives could be disrupted.
      .On the one hand, the report said, the Selective Service System should
      establish contacts in advance with medical societies, hospitals,
      schools of medicine and nursing, managed care organizations, rural
      health care providers and the editors of medical journals and trade
      publications.
      .On the other hand, it said, such contacts must be limited, low key
      and discreet because "overtures from Selective Service to the medical
      community will be seen as precursors to a draft," and that could alarm
      the public.
      .In this election year, the report said, "very few ideas or activities
      are viewed without some degree of cynicism."
      .President George W. Bush has flatly declared that there will be no
      draft, but Senator John Kerry has suggested that this is a possibility
      if Bush is re-elected.
      .Richard Flahavan, spokesman for the Selective Service System, said
      Monday: "We have been routinely updating the entire plan for a health
      care draft. The plan is on the shelf and will remain there unless
      Congress and the president decide that it's needed and direct us to
      carry it out."
      .The Selective Service does not decide whether a draft will occur. It
      would carry out the mechanics only if the president and Congress
      authorized a draft.
      .The chief Pentagon spokesman, Lawrence Di Rita, said Monday: "It is
      the policy of this administration to oppose a military draft for any
      purpose whatsoever.
      ."A return to the draft is unthinkable," he said. "There will be no
      draft."
      .Di Rita said the armed forces could offer bonus pay and other
      incentives to attract and retain medical specialists.
      .In 1987, Congress enacted a law requiring the Selective Service to
      develop a plan for "registration and classification" of health care
      professionals essential to the armed forces.
      .Under the plan, Flahavan said, about 3.4 million male and female
      health care workers ages 18 to 44 would be expected to register with
      the Selective Service.
      .From this pool, he said, the agency could select tens of thousands of
      health care professionals practicing in 62 health care specialties.
      ."The Selective Service System plans on delivering about 36,000 health
      care specialists to the Defense Department if and when a special
      skills draft were activated," Flahavan said.
      .The contractor hired by Selective Service, Widmeyer Communications,
      said that local government operations would be affected by a call-up
      of emergency medical technicians, so it advised the Selective Service
      to contact groups like the U.S. Conference of Mayors and the National
      Association of Counties.
      .Doctors and nurses would be eligible for deferments if they could
      show that they were providing essential health care services to
      civilians in their communities.
      .But the contractor said: "There is no getting around the fact that a
      medical draft would disrupt lives. Many familial, business and
      community responsibilities will be impacted."

      WASHINGTON The Selective Service has been updating its contingency
      plans for a draft of doctors, nurses and other health care workers in
      case of a national emergency that overwhelmed the military's medical
      corps.
      .
      In a confidential report this summer, a contractor hired by the agency
      described how such a draft might work, how to secure compliance and
      how to mold public opinion and communicate with health care
      professionals, whose lives could be disrupted.
      .
      On the one hand, the report said, the Selective Service System should
      establish contacts in advance with medical societies, hospitals,
      schools of medicine and nursing, managed care organizations, rural
      health care providers and the editors of medical journals and trade
      publications.
      .
      On the other hand, it said, such contacts must be limited, low key and
      discreet because "overtures from Selective Service to the medical
      community will be seen as precursors to a draft," and that could alarm
      the public.
      .
      In this election year, the report said, "very few ideas or activities
      are viewed without some degree of cynicism."
      .
      President George W. Bush has flatly declared that there will be no
      draft, but Senator John Kerry has suggested that this is a possibility
      if Bush is re-elected.
      .
      Richard Flahavan, spokesman for the Selective Service System, said
      Monday: "We have been routinely updating the entire plan for a health
      care draft. The plan is on the shelf and will remain there unless
      Congress and the president decide that it's needed and direct us to
      carry it out."
      .
      The Selective Service does not decide whether a draft will occur. It
      would carry out the mechanics only if the president and Congress
      authorized a draft.
      .
      The chief Pentagon spokesman, Lawrence Di Rita, said Monday: "It is
      the policy of this administration to oppose a military draft for any
      purpose whatsoever.
      .
      "A return to the draft is unthinkable," he said. "There will be no draft."
      .
      Di Rita said the armed forces could offer bonus pay and other
      incentives to attract and retain medical specialists.
      .
      In 1987, Congress enacted a law requiring the Selective Service to
      develop a plan for "registration and classification" of health care
      professionals essential to the armed forces.
      .
      Under the plan, Flahavan said, about 3.4 million male and female
      health care workers ages 18 to 44 would be expected to register with
      the Selective Service.
      .
      From this pool, he said, the agency could select tens of thousands of
      health care professionals practicing in 62 health care specialties.
      .
      "The Selective Service System plans on delivering about 36,000 health
      care specialists to the Defense Department if and when a special
      skills draft were activated," Flahavan said.
      .
      The contractor hired by Selective Service, Widmeyer Communications,
      said that local government operations would be affected by a call-up
      of emergency medical technicians, so it advised the Selective Service
      to contact groups like the U.S. Conference of Mayors and the National
      Association of Counties.
      .
      Doctors and nurses would be eligible for deferments if they could show
      that they were providing essential health care services to civilians
      in their communities.
      .
      But the contractor said: "There is no getting around the fact that a
      medical draft would disrupt lives. Many familial, business and
      community responsibilities will be impacted."
      .
      WASHINGTON The Selective Service has been updating its contingency
      plans for a draft of doctors, nurses and other health care workers in
      case of a national emergency that overwhelmed the military's medical
      corps.
      .
      In a confidential report this summer, a contractor hired by the agency
      described how such a draft might work, how to secure compliance and
      how to mold public opinion and communicate with health care
      professionals, whose lives could be disrupted.
      .
      On the one hand, the report said, the Selective Service System should
      establish contacts in advance with medical societies, hospitals,
      schools of medicine and nursing, managed care organizations, rural
      health care providers and the editors of medical journals and trade
      publications.
      .
      On the other hand, it said, such contacts must be limited, low key and
      discreet because "overtures from Selective Service to the medical
      community will be seen as precursors to a draft," and that could alarm
      the public.
      .
      In this election year, the report said, "very few ideas or activities
      are viewed without some degree of cynicism."
      .
      President George W. Bush has flatly declared that there will be no
      draft, but Senator John Kerry has suggested that this is a possibility
      if Bush is re-elected.
      .
      Richard Flahavan, spokesman for the Selective Service System, said
      Monday: "We have been routinely updating the entire plan for a health
      care draft. The plan is on the shelf and will remain there unless
      Congress and the president decide that it's needed and direct us to
      carry it out."
      .
      The Selective Service does not decide whether a draft will occur. It
      would carry out the mechanics only if the president and Congress
      authorized a draft.
      .
      The chief Pentagon spokesman, Lawrence Di Rita, said Monday: "It is
      the policy of this administration to oppose a military draft for any
      purpose whatsoever.
      .
      "A return to the draft is unthinkable," he said. "There will be no draft."
      .
      Di Rita said the armed forces could offer bonus pay and other
      incentives to attract and retain medical specialists.
      .
      In 1987, Congress enacted a law requiring the Selective Service to
      develop a plan for "registration and classification" of health care
      professionals essential to the armed forces.
      .
      Under the plan, Flahavan said, about 3.4 million male and female
      health care workers ages 18 to 44 would be expected to register with
      the Selective Service.
      .
      From this pool, he said, the agency could select tens of thousands of
      health care professionals practicing in 62 health care specialties.
      .
      "The Selective Service System plans on delivering about 36,000 health
      care specialists to the Defense Department if and when a special
      skills draft were activated," Flahavan said.
      .
      The contractor hired by Selective Service, Widmeyer Communications,
      said that local government operations would be affected by a call-up
      of emergency medical technicians, so it advised the Selective Service
      to contact groups like the U.S. Conference of Mayors and the National
      Association of Counties.
      .
      Doctors and nurses would be eligible for deferments if they could show
      that they were providing essential health care services to civilians
      in their communities.
      .
      But the contractor said: "There is no getting around the fact that a
      medical draft would disrupt lives. Many familial, business and
      community responsibilities will be impacted."
      .
      WASHINGTON The Selective Service has been updating its contingency
      plans for a draft of doctors, nurses and other health care workers in
      case of a national emergency that overwhelmed the military's medical
      corps.
      .
      In a confidential report this summer, a contractor hired by the agency
      described how such a draft might work, how to secure compliance and
      how to mold public opinion and communicate with health care
      professionals, whose lives could be disrupted.
      .
      On the one hand, the report said, the Selective Service System should
      establish contacts in advance with medical societies, hospitals,
      schools of medicine and nursing, managed care organizations, rural
      health care providers and the editors of medical journals and trade
      publications.
      .
      On the other hand, it said, such contacts must be limited, low key and
      discreet because "overtures from Selective Service to the medical
      community will be seen as precursors to a draft," and that could alarm
      the public.
      .
      In this election year, the report said, "very few ideas or activities
      are viewed without some degree of cynicism."
      .
      President George W. Bush has flatly declared that there will be no
      draft, but Senator John Kerry has suggested that this is a possibility
      if Bush is re-elected.
      .
      Richard Flahavan, spokesman for the Selective Service System, said
      Monday: "We have been routinely updating the entire plan for a health
      care draft. The plan is on the shelf and will remain there unless
      Congress and the president decide that it's needed and direct us to
      carry it out."
      .
      The Selective Service does not decide whether a draft will occur. It
      would carry out the mechanics only if the president and Congress
      authorized a draft.
      .
      The chief Pentagon spokesman, Lawrence Di Rita, said Monday: "It is
      the policy of this administration to oppose a military draft for any
      purpose whatsoever.
      .
      "A return to the draft is unthinkable," he said. "There will be no draft."
      .
      Di Rita said the armed forces could offer bonus pay and other
      incentives to attract and retain medical specialists.
      .
      In 1987, Congress enacted a law requiring the Selective Service to
      develop a plan for "registration and classification" of health care
      professionals essential to the armed forces.
      .
      Under the plan, Flahavan said, about 3.4 million male and female
      health care workers ages 18 to 44 would be expected to register with
      the Selective Service.
      .
      From this pool, he said, the agency could select tens of thousands of
      health care professionals practicing in 62 health care specialties.
      .
      "The Selective Service System plans on delivering about 36,000 health
      care specialists to the Defense Department if and when a special
      skills draft were activated," Flahavan said.
      .
      The contractor hired by Selective Service, Widmeyer Communications,
      said that local government operations would be affected by a call-up
      of emergency medical technicians, so it advised the Selective Service
      to contact groups like the U.S. Conference of Mayors and the National
      Association of Counties.
      .
      Doctors and nurses would be eligible for deferments if they could show
      that they were providing essential health care services to civilians
      in their communities.
      .
      But the contractor said: "There is no getting around the fact that a
      medical draft would disrupt lives. Many familial, business and
      community responsibilities will be impacted."
      .
      http://www.iht.com/articles/2004/10/19/news/draft.html


      _


      Fear of military draft prompts West Boynton grandmother to take action

      By Rhonda J. Miller
      Staff Writer
      Posted November 19 2004

      Bea Turk says she gets upset when she hears about young people
      fighting, losing limbs or dying in the war in Iraq. They remind her of
      her grandson, Brett Ackerman, 18, a University of Florida freshman.

      When Turk read a newspaper article about a proposed bill in Congress
      to start a mandatory military draft for 18- to 26-year-olds and not
      allow college deferments, she became an activist.









      By the next day, she and neighbor Randy Rubin had petitions against
      the legislation. Turk carried them to the hairdresser, her mah-jongg
      group and her husband Mel's physical therapy appointments.

      They were passed around at a "Meet the Candidates" session in her
      Valencia Lakes community west of Boynton Beach.

      She got 920 signatures in a few weeks and sent 30 packets of 70 pages
      to government leaders in Florida and Washington at the end of
      September. The mailing list included President Bush and presidential
      candidate Sen. John Kerry, D-Mass.

      Then the draft issue died in Congress.

      On Oct. 5, the U.S. House of Representatives voted 402-2 against the
      bill, HR-163. The next day, Sen. Fritz Hollings, D-S.C., who had
      introduced the Senate version, S-89, in January 2003, withdrew his
      support. He issued a statement saying the country still needs more
      troops, but " . . . we were misled in Iraq and you don't draft young
      Americans for a mistake, particularly when they can't win. Under these
      circumstances, I would vote against my own bill."

      The bill didn't come to a vote in the Senate. "I'd say the bill is
      dead if the sponsor withdrew his support and there's no co-sponsor,"
      said Hollings' spokeswoman Eileen Zeldin.

      But Turk is not letting go that easily. She is convinced that manpower
      for the Iraq war has to come from somewhere and thinks there's a
      possibility that the issue might come up again.

      The fact that the issue was mentioned in one of the presidential
      debates shows there is still cause for concern, she said. "I think
      it's just been put on the back burner."

      So she is working on a follow-up letter to the 30 leaders who got the
      packets, asking them to keep an eye on the issue.

      Turk's mission started over coffee one morning when she read a
      newspaper opinion piece by Bobbie Bender about the possibility of the
      draft being reinstated. It was eliminated in 1973 after years of
      protests during the Vietnam War, but the Selective Service System
      still requires males to register shortly before their 18th birthday.

      Bender, 48, is a freelance writer who lives west of Boynton Beach. He
      researched on the proposed legislation, the Universal National Service
      Act of 2003.

      "As soon as they mention the draft and women, I get very nervous. The
      only child I have is my daughter, and we're very close. I don't want
      her in another Vietnam," Bender said.

      His daughter, Catherine, 17, is a student at Forest Hill High School
      in West Palm Beach.

      Bender had a high draft lottery number that wasn't called during the
      Vietnam War, as well as a college deferment. He said he doesn't hear
      straight answers when politicians mention the draft.

      Turk's grandson said he doesn't think the issue is clear, either.

      "If they institute the draft, I think it would backfire," said
      Ackerman, a history major who plans to study law or journalism in
      graduate school. "Instead of getting volunteers, they'd force people
      to go into this war."

      Ackerman's grandfather, Mel Turk, said he isn't necessarily against
      the draft. A registered Republican, he served in the Navy during World
      War II. His wife of 53 years is a Democrat, and they say the issue
      doesn't divide them.

      "The draft issue is important to me, and I'm going to follow through,"
      Bea Turk said. "It's not political."

      Rhonda J. Miller can be reached at rjmiller@... or
      561-243-6605.
      http://www.sun-sentinel.com/news/local/palmbeach/sfl-bc19draftnov19,0,4824740.story?coll=sfla-news-palm

      ______
    • sickairstyle1
      Just to throw two cents in for anyone considering joining the military if a draft occurs: I ve heard a lot of people say they d join the military in the case
      Message 2 of 2 , Nov 24, 2004
        Just to throw two cents in for anyone considering joining the
        military if a draft occurs:

        I've heard a lot of people say they'd join the military in the case
        of draft so they could make sure they kept an eye out for war
        crimes. In this case, don't forget that even if there was a "combat-
        draft", as opposed to a "non-combat draft," you may not get to pick
        where you go or have any choice between what your position is. The
        worst they can do to us for dodging the draft is throw us in jail,
        and I'd like to see what happens when Americans are continually
        refusing to go. I understand people who say they want to make sure
        things are done right overseas if they're drafted, and in fact, I
        thought that for a while. Let me dig into my unconcious and set it
        in front of you, though: I think it would be really cool to join
        Special Forces, kill a bunch of terrorists, save a bunch of babies,
        and call myself a hero. But that's not going to happen if I get
        drafted, and I should just join a humanitarian aid group if I really
        want to help out overseas.

        Sickair
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