Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

FWD: UC Davis Environment News Tips

Expand Messages
  • Julie Setele
    University of California, Davis July 21, 2003 STUDY: MONEY REALLY DOES GROW ON TREES A large, 40-year-old tree can pay back as much as $160 per year to
    Message 1 of 1 , Jul 21 3:29 PM
    • 0 Attachment
      University of California, Davis
      July 21, 2003

      STUDY: MONEY REALLY DOES GROW ON TREES

      A large, 40-year-old tree can pay back as much as $160 per year to
      homeowners and taxpayers in the American West, say researchers at the
      USDA Center for Urban Forest Research at UC Davis.

      For example, said center director Greg McPherson, a 40-year-old ash
      tree in Claremont, Calif., would intercept over 4,800 gallons of
      stormwater, remove 6 pounds of air pollutants, reduce energy costs of
      cooling by up to 30 percent, and add 1 percent to resale value of a
      home. In contrast, the costs of that tree are considerably less,
      ranging from $28 for a yard tree to $36 for a street or park tree.

      The benefits are detailed in a series of tree guides for the Western
      United States from the Center for Urban Forest Research. The guides
      are intended to describe the benefits and costs of planting trees for
      community officials and tree managers, and to increase public
      awareness and support for tree programs.

      The fifth guide in the series has just been released: "Northern
      Mountain and Prairie Tree Guide: Benefits, Costs and Strategic
      Planting." The new guide was written for the "cold and snowy" climate
      region, which includes Northern California, Western Washington and
      Oregon, Alaska, Idaho, Montana, the Dakotas; Nebraska, Wyoming,
      Nevada, Utah, Colorado and the mountainous areas of New Mexico,
      Arizona and Southern California.

      Future guides are planned for the San Francisco Bay Area and the
      desert Southwest climate regions. Already published are guides for
      the Inland Empire (which includes the Claremont example), South Coast
      and San Joaquin Valley climate regions of California, and the rainy
      Northwest climate region of western Washington and Oregon.

      The Center for Urban Forest Research is a U.S. Forest Service program
      housed in the Department of Environmental Horticulture at UC Davis.
      Director McPherson is a UC Davis faculty member.

      Media contact(s):
      * Sylvia Wright, UC Davis News Service, (530) 752-7704,
      swright@...

      Additional contact(s):
      * Greg McPherson, Center for Urban Forest Research, (530) 752-7636,
      egmcpherson@...
      * Jim Geiger, Communications, Center for Urban Forest Research, (530)
      752-7636, jgeiger@...

      ----------------------------------------------
      Julie Setele
      Graduate Student
      Department of Sociology
      University of California, Davis
      ----------------------------------------------
      www.ucdavispeace.org
    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.