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Re: Twitchell's Scam Was/Is a Typical Con (b)

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  • prometheus_973
    Hello All, I thought I d take another look at this and reanalyze Twitchell s distortions below. Chapter Five THE COVER-UP Who is Sudar Singh? Paul Twitchell
    Message 1 of 2 , Jan 20, 2012
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      Hello All,
      I thought I'd take another
      look at this and reanalyze
      Twitchell's distortions below.


      Chapter Five

      THE COVER-UP

      Who is Sudar Singh?


      Paul Twitchell claims he had two teachers who taught him the path of Eckankar.
      The first was Satguru Sudar Singh, who, according to Twitchell, made his
      residence in Allahabad, India, until the late 1930's or 1940's (Twitchell does
      not seem sure). [1]

      ME: Interesting that Twitchell
      used Allahabad, India for this
      "Sudar," Kirpal Singh substitute,
      since that's where not only
      Kirpal was located but also
      where Swami Sri Yukteswar
      visited and this was mentioned
      in his book "The Holy Science"
      where, also, the Mahanta was
      mentioned among other Eckankar
      dogma.

      The second was Rebazar Tarzs, a Tibetan monk reputedly over five hundred years
      old. With the latter, there is no way to verify his existence because Twitchell
      alleges that the Tibetan monk can only be visited via "soul travel".


      ME: This is a good con!
      First, you have to establish
      yourself as the highest
      authority and then you
      can discount anything and
      everything the competition
      has to say... as well as the
      dreams of your followers
      if they place them on an
      equal level to you. However,
      if one uses some logic and
      common sense you can see
      the fraud.

      But, religionists will always
      counter their bullshit by
      pulling out the belief and
      faith card. Klemp certainly
      has! But, where's the two-way
      street with these unavailable
      and invisible "ancient" ECK
      Masters who still have physical
      bodies? Can't "Rebazar" visit
      others, such as H.I.s, at seminars
      while in his physical body?
      Why does he always have to
      "appear" in disguise? See!
      There's the lie and the proof
      that it's a lie! It's the same
      lie that was in Yukteswar's
      book.


      As stated earlier, Twitchell maintains that he first met Sudar Singh in Paris,
      France, when he was in his teens. Later, he states that he and his sister went
      to Sudar Singh's ashram in Allahabad and lived with the guru for over a year.
      Although Twitchell readily recounts his experiences with the Indian adept, he
      curiously gives no dates, except one found in Eckankar: The Key To Secret
      Worlds, concerning his visit. [2]


      ME: True! Twit gives no date
      because it's a lie. In his June,
      1971 interviews, found in
      "Difficulties Of Becoming
      The Living ECK Master," Paul
      gives us information to be
      analyzed in determining real
      dates. These prove that he
      was lying. Twitchell was born
      1908-1910 and Klemp gives
      his DOB as Oct. 22, 1908.
      Thus, when PT claims to have
      been in India at age 15 (for
      the 1st time) the date had
      to be 1923.

      [1] In the book In My Soul I Am Free, Twitchell claims that Sudar Singh was
      one-hundred and five years old when he died. While in another work, he alleges
      that the guru died in his late nineties.

      Curiously, in the book Eckankar: The Key to Secret Worlds, Twitchell writes
      that Sudar Singh was a very young man when he met Rebazar Tarzs in Agra,
      India, in 1885. If we accept Twitchell's claim that Sudar Singh died at one-hundred
      and five years old in either the late 1930's or 1940's, it makes the Allahabad guru
      over forty years old in 1885.

      ME: Well, Swami Sri Yukteswar
      was from 1855-1936 and
      it's clear PT used the info in
      his book "The Holy Science."
      Also, Kirpal Singh's (1894-1974)
      master, Baba Sawan Singh Ji,
      was from 1858-1948.

      The implications are obvious: Does Twitchell consider "forty years old" (or more) to
      be a very young man?

      ME: Sure! Look at Twitchell's
      real age when he created
      Eckankar in 1965. PT (using
      the 1908 birthdate) was 57
      years old/young.




      Further suspicion about the actual existence of "Sudar
      Singh" arises when we learn that Twitchell's account of his master is based upon
      the life story of Baba Jaimal Singh, the founder of the Radha Soami Satsang at
      Beas (refer to the appendix on plagiarism). Although it is only conjecture, it
      would appear that Twitchell coined the name "Sudar" from the longer name
      "Sudarshan" , who was a nephew of Shiv Dayal Singh, the originator of the
      Radhasoami path. This same "Sudarshan Singh" also resided for a time in
      Allahabad, India.

      In summation, Twitchell has used the name "Sudar Singh" (which
      he most likely lifted from Julian P. Johnson's book, With A Great Master in
      India, since it contains a section on Sudarshan Singh) as a cover name for
      several different teachers, but most notably for Kirpal Singh.

      [2] Writes Twitchell,

      ". . . I found this to be true of Sudar Singh, the strange mystic of Allahabad,
      in the summer of 1938, when I visited him with my step-sister."
      firms that he was the source for his fictitious "1922" birth date.
      [An interesting sidebar here, connected to our previous footnote: Sudarshan
      Singh, the nephew of Shiv Dayal Singh, died in 1936 at Soamibagh, just outside
      of Agra city.]


      ME: Twitchell is quite
      the liar. First, this was
      his real sister and not
      his step-sister. PT made
      up a story about the
      "birth of the Mahanta"
      after January, 1969
      where he was born on
      a riverboat and caste
      adrift like Moses and
      found by his "step-sister."
      He was able to use this
      lie because his sister
      died in 1959. Actually,
      Twitchell never got out
      of the States until he
      joined the Navy in 1942.
      So, the whole story of
      being 15 years old
      and this being 1938
      along with being in
      Paris, France and India
      and meeting, living
      with and being initiated
      by Sudar was all a big
      fat lie!


      According to Steiger's account (which also gives no dates), it would be in the
      late 1930's, early 1940's, when Twitchell visited India. Yet, according to
      Twitchell's actual birth date (1908-1912), it would have to be the late 1920's
      when he visited India. In both cases, however, there is no proof, documentary or
      otherwise, to support Twitchell's self-claimed travels to India. The doubtful
      nature of Twitchell's travels gains further support when we learn that the first
      mention of his guru Sudar Singh is not until the January 1964 issue of Orion
      Magazine. Before that time, Twitchell makes no reference to the elusive Indian
      master. [3]


      ME: Steiger is as much
      of a liar as was Twit.
      Look at the books that
      Steiger has written! This
      is probably why Twitchell
      approached him to do
      a book!


      As Twitchell's travels to India at a young age are extremely doubtful, his
      account of Sudar Singh (whom he claims to have met at the same time) also
      becomes highly questionable. There is no indication in Twitchell's actual life
      (versus his created one) or written works that Sudar Singh is a real person. The
      true identity of Sudar Singh is intimately tied with Twitchell's efforts to
      cover-up his past associations with certain teachers. This cover-up was started
      by Twitchell in January 1964, and continues today under the present Living Eck
      Master, Harold Klemp.


      Today, in Eckankar's extensive literature, there is no mention whatsoever of
      Swami Premananda or Kirpal Singh. Most Eckists have never even heard of either
      of these two gurus. The reason why is because from 1964 to 1971, in a slow but
      finally accelerated process, Twitchell had both names, which appeared throughout
      his original writings, The Tiger's Fang, The Flute of God, and other assorted
      articles, edited out. He replaced the names of his actual teachers, Swami
      Premananda and Kirpal Singh, with the names "Sudar Singh" and "Rebazar Tarzs."
      And, although Twitchell spent a total of eight years studying under Kirpal
      Singh, he denied in 1971 that he was ever initiated by him.


      The cover-up was commenced by Twitchell after the "Tiger's Fang incident" in
      1963. It was in his preparation for founding Eckankar which led Twitchell to
      create a whole new mythology--a mythology which included a new biography for
      himself. Twitchell's biography included new teachers, new travels, and new
      insights. Yet, Twitchell could not destroy all of his previous articles,
      associations, or his family heritage. These remnants were too vast and too
      scattered to eradicate. It is from these records that we find the "old" Paul
      Twitchell.

      ME: Yes, Kirpal Singh, Paul's
      real master had his Tiger's
      Fang manuscript and finally
      returned it to him around
      June, 1966.


      [3] In none of Twitchell's writings before 1964 is there any mention of Sudar
      Singh. However, Twitchell does refer to Kirpal Singh, Swami Premananda, and L.
      Ron Hubbard before this date.

      Cover-Up: First Phase

      Twitchell's first reference to Satguru Sudar Singh was not meant as an
      introduction for his readers (or his followers) to his actual, but hidden, past;
      rather, it was meant as his first preface to his new biography--a biography
      which rapidly changed with the growth of Eckankar. Although Twitchell's real
      life narrative included a bevy of different gurus, teachers, and movements, it
      did not include "Sudar Singh" or "Rebazar Tarzs." Both gurus served only as
      mythological characterizations of Twitchell's genuine and imagined biography.
      Their existence was factual to some extent as "cover-names" for real gurus. They
      were so named perhaps because of Twitchell's vivid occult imagination, abetted
      by his knowledge of Theosophical literature on the "Great White Masters."


      Twitchell's first cover-up or editing appears in the January 1964 issue of Orion
      Magazine, where he introduces Sudar Singh for the first time. It reads:


      "I began my study of bilocation under the tutelage of Satguru Sudar Singh, in
      Allahabad, India. Later, I switched to Sri Kirpal Singh of Old Delhi. Both were
      teaching the Shabda Yoga, that which is called the Yoga of the Sound Current. I
      had to learn to leave my body at will and return, without effort. Also among my
      writings are numerous discourses from many master [sic], in the flesh and those
      on the inner planes. I have talked with and taken down the words of Kirpal Singh
      who appeared in my apartment in his Nari Raup, his light body, although his
      physical body was six thousand miles away in India."

      In the entire article, there is no reference whatsoever to Rebazar Tarzs. Yet,
      in 1966, when Twitchell republished the article almost verbatim in the booklet,
      Introduction to Eckankar, he changed the words bilocation and shabda yoga to
      "Eckankar"; and the two times he mentions Kirpal Singh, he changes to "Rebazar
      Tarzs" and "Sudar Singh" respectively. The original article, although edited
      later and more thoroughly, was itself a product of editing, for the name "Sudar
      Singh" is actually a cover name for Swami Premananda, who was Twitchell's first
      yoga teacher. [4]

      [4] Refer to the appendix on Cover-up for a detailed study of Twitchell's
      editing.]


      Of the several articles reprinted in Introduction to Eckankar, most have
      undergone name replacements. A total of at least eight names have been edited
      out and replaced with a hierarchy of Eck masters. The list of names edited out
      includes Sawan Singh, Kirpal Singh, and Swami Premananda. Each guru has either
      been replaced by "Sudar Singh" or "Rebazar Tarzs," while the main text remains
      untouched. Although Twitchell attempted to do a scrupulous job of redacting, he
      made one slight error in the index to Introduction to Eckankar. The editor lists
      the name "Sawan Singh" as occurring on page five of the text; yet, on page five,
      it reads "Sudar Singh." The first four editions of the booklet carried the
      error; the fifth edition finally corrected it. The original article from which
      the mistake was made was published in the September 1965 issue of Search
      Magazine. It reads in part:


      "From Kabir's day those who have helped spread the doctrine of bilocation were
      mainly, the leader of the Sikh order, especially Nanka Guru [sic], the founder.
      Others have been the Sufi saints, e.g., Hafiz, Jalal din Rumi, Shamus Tabriz,
      and Sawan Singh, Kirpal Singh, St. Anthony of Padua, and the contemporary
      clergyman, Padre Pie [sic], to name a few."

      The reprinted, "Can You Be in Two Places At The Same Time," in the booklet
      Introduction to Eckankar, reads:

      "From Kabir's day, those who have helped spread the doctrine of Soul Travel were
      mainly the leaders of the Sikh order, especially Nanka Guru [sic], the founder.
      Others have been the Sufi saints, e.g., Hafiz, Jalal din'l Rumi, Shamus Tabriz,
      Sudar Singh, St. Anthony of Padua, and the contemporary clergyman, Padre Pio, to
      name a few." [5]

      [5] Paul Twitchell, Introduction to Eckankar (Las Vegas: Illuminated Way Press,
      1966), pages 2-6.]

      In the original article, Twitchell had mentioned Kirpal Singh three times; in
      the revised edition his name has been changed to read "Sudar Singh." The
      original reads:

      "Kirpal Singh who is still at his own ashram in India, has the ability to appear
      to his own people, in his Nuri Sarup body, no matter where they may be. A skill
      which almost anybody can learn who gets the knack of bilocation. Among my
      numerous discourses from many gurus in the flesh and those on the inner planes,
      are those taken down when Kirpal Singh appeared in my apartment in Washington,
      D.C., in his light body, although his flesh self was six-thousand miles away in
      India."


      The revised article, with name replacements, reads:

      "Sudar Singh, who lived in his ashram in India, had the ability to appear to his
      own people in his Atma Sarup body, no matter where they might be. A skill almost
      anyone can learn who gets the knack of Soul Travel. . . Among my numerous
      discourses from many gurus in the flesh and those on the inner planes, are taken
      down when Sudar Singh appeared in my apartment in New York City, in his light
      body, although his flesh self was six thousand miles away in India."


      Not only had Twitchell changed the name Kirpal Singh to "Sudar Singh," he also
      altered certain factors in his past to fit in with his "new" biography. Writes
      Woodrow Nichols:


      "This holy cover-up was nothing new in the previous experience of Paul
      Twitchell. If we go back to Singh's accusation that there were some facts
      (descriptions) in The Tiger's Fang that were inaccurate, it should become
      apparent that Twitchell had a long history of rewriting history." [6]
      [6] Woodrow Nichols and Mark Albrecht, "Eckankar: The Ancient Science of
      Deception," op. cit.


      The Flute of God: A Case Study of Re-Editing

      Twitchell's enormous editing of names reached a pinnacle when he decided to
      publish in book form The Flute of God. The work was originally printed in
      installments in Orion Magazine, from 1965 to 1967. The first six chapters of the
      text profusely mention the names of Kirpal Singh, Sawan Singh, and Jesus Christ.
      When Twitchell had the book republished, however, he redacted every single
      mention of Kirpal Singh, Sawan Singh, and Swami Premananda. In some cases, he
      even edited out the name Jesus and replaced it with "Gopal Das" or other
      Eckankar Masters. And, although he quotes from the Christian Bible, he even
      changes the name of his source (to that of the Shariyat-Ki-Sugmad) while
      retaining the same biblical quote. Below is a comparison study of the two
      versions. Remember that the Orion version is the earliest, and that Twitchell's
      editing is primarily "name replacements."
      The Flute Of God by Paul Twitchell as it appeared in installments in Orion
      Magazine. Chapter I - "In The Beginning" (March-April, 1966):

      Par. 3: "I remember very well when Swami Premananda, of India, who has a Yoga
      church in Washington, D. C., said, 'When someone asked Bertrand Russell what his
      philosophy of Life was, he wrote several volumes of books on the subject."
      The Flute Of God by Paul Twitchell as published by Illuminated Way Press (1970).
      Chapter I - "In The Beginning":

      Par. 3: "I remember very well when Sudar Singh, the great Eck Master said, 'When
      someone asked Bertrand Russell what his philosophy of Life was, he wrote several
      volumes of books on the subject."
      The Flute Of God by Paul Twitchell as it appeared in installments in Orion
      Magazine. Chapter I - "In The Beginning" (March-April, 1966):

      Par. 15: "I have studied under many teacher [sic], and may yet have to study
      under more. Like Meher Baba, the Indian saint, who was said to have nineteen
      teachers to help him gain his place in the universe, I have so far had seven,
      some outstanding ones, including Sri Kirpal Singh, of Delhi, India."
      The Flute Of God by Paul Twitchell as published by Illuminated Way Press (1970).
      Chapter I - "In The Beginning":

      Par. 16: "I have studied under many ECK Masters only they have led me to the
      highest truth. Like Fubbi Quantz, the ECK saint, who was said to have nineteen
      teachers to help him gain his place in the universe, I have also had several,
      each outstanding, one being Sudar Singh of India."

      The Flute Of God by Paul Twitchell as it appeared in installments in Orion
      Magazine. Chapter I - "In The Beginning" (March-April, 1966):

      Par. 16: "Each has had a place in my growth toward the spiritual goal; each are
      equally great in their work for mankind. However, I have felt a closer kinship
      and friendliness to Kirpal Singh, who has shown me a lot of the other work
      during my first year or so under him. Since we have parted he keeps an impartial
      view toward me and my research. Therefore, if I quote him in these pages it is
      because I feel that he is sympathetic and interested in my work."
      The Flute Of God by Paul Twitchell as published by Illuminated Way Press (1970).
      Chapter I - "In The Beginning":

      Par. 17: "Each has had a place in my growth toward the spiritual goal; each is
      equally great in his work for mankind. However, I have felt a closer kinship and
      friendliness to Sudar Singh, who showed me a lot of the other work, during my
      first year or so under him. Since we have parted he has retained an impartial
      view toward me and my research. If I quote him in these pages it is because I
      feel that he is sympathetic and interested in my work and led me to Rebazar
      Tarzs."

      The Flute Of God by Paul Twitchell as it appeared in installments in Orion
      Magazine. Chapter I - "In The Beginning" (March-April, 1966):

      Par. 32: "Life fascinates me. Certain details of life to be worked out are
      strange. Lying on the bed late at night I watch the pattern of shadows weaving
      about the room. In the presence of familiar night visitors like Kirpal Singh, or
      Rebazar Tarzs, a Tibetan Lama, who come often in their Nuri-Sarup, or others,
      some strangers, some friends, I wonder about life."
      The Flute Of God by Paul Twitchell as published by Illuminated Way Press (1970).
      Chapter I - "In The Beginning":

      Par. 34: "Life fascinates me. Certain details of life that have to be worked out
      are strange. Lying on the bed late at night I watch the pattern of shadows
      weaving about the room. In the presence of familiar night visitors like Sudar
      Singh, or Rebazar Tarzs, the ECK Masters who come often in their Nuri-Sarup
      bodies, or others, some strangers, some friends, I wonder about life."

      The Flute Of God by Paul Twitchell as it appeared in installments in Orion
      Magazine. Chapter II - "The Symbol of The Princes":

      Par. 12: "Therefore, the principal (sic) involved here is: `We live and have our
      being in the Supreme Being.' Jesus said it in another way as `we move and have
      our being in God.' Other savants e.g., Jalalddin Maulana Rumi put it another
      way, `Divine Grace is not limited by the conditions of ability, but ability, in
      fact, is conditioned by Divine Grace.'"
      The Flute Of God by Paul Twitchell as published by Illuminated Way Press (1970).
      Chapter II - "The Symbol of The Princes":

      Par. 11: "Therefore, the principle involved here is,`We live and have our being
      in the Supreme Being.' Lai Tsi, the Chinese ECK Master, said it this way, `We
      live and move and have our being in the SUGMAD.' Other savants state it in a
      slightly different vein. For instance, Jalaluddin Maulana Rumi said, `Divine
      Grace is not limited by the conditions of ability - -but ability, in fact, is
      conditioned by Divine Grace.'"

      The Flute Of God by Paul Twitchell as it appeared in installments in Orion
      Magazine. Chapter II - "The Symbol of The Princes":

      Par. 48: "This is what Kirpal Singh speaks of in his discourses. `We must become
      the conscious co-worker of God.' Meaning, of course, that once man is freed of
      his imbalances he inherits the throne and does his work for the whole."
      The Flute Of God by Paul Twitchell as published by Illuminated Way Press (1970).
      Chapter II - "The Symbol of the Princes":

      Par. 45: "This is what Sudar Singh spoke of in his dialogues. `We must become
      the conscious co-workers of God.'"
      The Flute Of God by Paul Twitchell as it appeared in installments in Orion
      Magazine. Chapter III - "Purification of the Princes" (Sept.-Oct. 1966):

      Par. 37: "All masters of earlier days, to name a few: Buddha, Gura Nanak (sic),
      Christ, Mohammed, Zoroaster, Lao Tse, George Fox, Sawan Singh, Confucius,
      Krishna and Shankhacharya exhorted us to know ourselves. Kabir says the same
      thing `Learn to die a hundred times daily, not once.'"
      The Flute Of God by Paul Twitchell as published by Illuminated Way Press (1970).
      Chapter III - "Purification of the Princes":

      Par. 37: "All ECK Masters of earlier days exhorted us to know ourselves. .
      .Gopal Das says the same thing, `Learn to die a hundred times daily, not once.'"
      The Flute Of God by Paul Twitchell as it appeared in installments in Orion
      Magazine. Chapter III - "Purification of the Princes" (Sept.-Oct. 1966):


      Par. 38: "Christ said, 'Blessed are the pure in heart for they shall see God.'
      Guru Nanak said, 'Be pure that truth may be realized.'"
      The Flute Of God by Paul Twitchell as published by Illuminated Way Press (1970).
      Chapter III - "Purification of the Princes":

      Par. 38: "Jesus said, 'Blessed are the pure in heart for they shall see God.'
      Rebazar Tarzs said, 'Be pure so that truth may be known.'"
      The Flute Of God by Paul Twitchell as it appeared in installment in Orion
      Magazine. Ch. I, Par.

      41:
      "When Jesus looked upon His people and said, `I cannot tell you more because you
      cannot hear the whole truth.' He was saying that they were so far down the
      spiral of life they could not grasp His meaning. To tell them all would bring
      disorder into their lives, for once exposed to Truth, those not understanding
      develop hostility."
      The Flute Of God by Paul Twitchell as published by Illuminated Way Press (1970).
      Ch. I, Par.

      42:
      "When the ECK Master, Gopal Das, looked upon his people and said, `I cannot tell
      you more because you cannot hear the whole ECK,' he was saying that they were so
      far down the spiral of life they could not grasp his meaning. To tell them would
      bring disorder into their lives, for once exposed to Truth, those not
      understanding develop hostility."
      The Flute Of God by Paul Twitchell as it appeared in installments in Orion
      Magazine. Ch. I,

      Par. 44:
      "One of my experiences while serving under the Yoga Satsang line of masters, was
      that I found one of the masters in the guise of a beggar. I had been in
      difficulty for sometime, and very unhappy over the fact that nothing could be
      found to solve my problem."
      The Flute Of God by Paul Twitchell as published by Illuminated Way Press (1970).
      Ch. I, Par.

      45:
      "One of my experiences, while serving under Rebazar Tarzs, was that I found one
      of the ECK Masters in the guise of a beggar. I had been in difficulty for some
      time, and was very unhappy over the fact that nothing could be found to solve my
      problem."
      Postscript: The Last Letter

      "I have never recognized you as a master, or that you give initiations, and that
      your work is not in the best interest of spirituality. Your teachings are
      orthodox, and as a preacher you are not capable of assisting anyone
      spiritually."
      --Paul Twitchell, 1971 (Personal letter to Kirpal Singh of Delhi, India) [7]

      "My Saints are Kabir. . . Rumi, Hafiz, Shamusi-Tabriz ...and Kirpal Singh of
      India." --Paul Twitchell, 1964 [8]

      "Master Kirpal Singh spoke briefly of these masters when he took me through the
      several invisible worlds in 1957." --Paul Twitchell, 1964 [9]

      "Kirpal Singh who is still living in his own ashram in India, has the ability to
      appear to his own people, in his Nuri Sarup body, no matter where they might
      be." --Paul Twitchell, 1965 [10]

      "I have studied under many teacher [sic]. I have so far had seven, some
      outstanding ones, including Sri Kirpal Singh, of Delhi, India." --Paul
      Twitchell, 1966 [11]


      As Paul Twitchell edited out the name Kirpal Singh in every rewrite he
      undertook, his cover-up grew by the late 1960's to such proportions that he even
      denied he was once initiated by Kirpal Singh. To many who knew him earlier,
      Twitchell had gone too far. Several, if not many, disciples of Kirpal Singh had
      attended satsangs with him; some had even been present at his initiation
      ceremony in 1955. Yet, Twitchell persisted: he continued to deny that he had any
      spiritual link with Kirpal Singh. He even went so far as to openly refute on
      tape that Kirpal Singh was the successor to Sawan Singh of Radhasoami Satsang
      Beas (who died in 1948), though it contradicted what he had stated previously in
      1965. Claimed

      Twitchell:
      "Guru Nanak became the founder of the Sikh order. Sawan Singh was the last of
      the Swami group of Masters. . . and Kirpal Singh claimed to become a follower in
      the same line of masters, and also Charan Singh who was a nephew [sic: Charan
      Singh is a grandson] of Sawan Singh, but neither one are masters because the
      mastership of this line stopped at Sawan Singh." [12]

      [7] Dorothe Ross, "All That Glistens is Not Gold," Leadership in Eck
      (July-August-September, 1976).
      [8] Paul Twitchell, "The Cliff Hanger," Psychic Observer, op. cit.
      [9] Paul Twitchell, "The God Eaters," Psychic Observer, op cit.
      [10] Paul Twitchell, "Can You Be In Two Places At The Same Time," Search
      (September 1965), page 22.
      [11] Paul Twitchell, "The Flute of God," Orion Magazine (March-April 1966), page
      32.
      [12] Bernadine Burlin, personal letter to the author, dated April 5, 1977.

      Yet only five years previously, Twitchell wrote:
      "These few who are following the ancient science do so loosely. However, Kirpal
      Singh, a living Guru, teaches the art (as) closely to the ancient teachings (as)
      possible, at his ashram in Old Delhi, India."

      "The art of exteriorization was revived by Kabir, the Hindu mystic-poet in the
      sixteenth century and passed through a succession of savants, by secret
      initiation until Sawan Singh openly started giving initiation to anyone who came
      to his ashram. When he passed his spiritual mantle to Kirpal Singh, the
      instructions were to carry out this policy." [13]

      The inherent contradictions in Twitchell's denial of his association with Kirpal
      Singh were too blatant for some Ruhani Satsang initiates to ignore. Several
      knowledgeable disciples began to give out the actual details of Twitchell's
      involvement with Kirpal Singh. Even the Ruhani Satsang Master himself commented
      on Twitchell's unusual actions:

      "Yes, Yes. Too much propaganda. I tell you one American was initiated by
      me--I've got the initiation report in his own handwriting. That is what
      such-like people will do. They had some little thing, got stuck fast there. Now
      he's carrying on propaganda. He says he was never initiated by me. He was
      initiated in 1955. Some people get stuck fast on the way. This little ego is
      very difficult to get rid of unless there's some kind of protection. This is a
      living example. He has written other books. I need not mention his name. " [14]

      [13] Paul Twitchell, "Ancient Science of Eckankar," publisher unknown (May
      1965).

      [14] Kirpal Singh, Heart To Heart Talks, Volume One, page 53.

      It is unclear howTwitchell finally heard of Kirpal Singh's comments about him.
      Nevertheless, by whichever means he heard (through tape, letter, or word of
      mouth), the fact remains that Twitchell was highly displeased. The reason why is
      obvious: if word got out that Paul had indeed been initiated by Kirpal Singh but
      was denying it, it would imply that the founder of Eckankar was lying; and a
      master who would lie (or deceive or cover-up) is to many spiritual seekers no
      master at all. Thus, in a strange but predictable maneuver, Twitchell sent a
      letter bombasting Kirpal Singh, denying that he was initiated by him, and
      threatening--totally without legal basis--a lawsuit if Kirpal Singh pressed the
      matter any further.

      Around the time that Kirpal Singh received the portending letter from the
      founder of Eckankar, Paul Twitchell died unexpectedly from a heart attack. [15]
      It was a curious turn of events, for Twitchell departed only months after
      claiming that he would live at least another five years--if not fifteen.

      [15] A copy of the letter that Paul Twitchell sent to Kirpal Singh shortly
      before his death is still in the possession of Gail Atkinson. According to
      several Ruhani Satsang initiates who were present in India when Twitchell's
      letter was received at Sawan Ashram, Kirpal Singh made the following comment:
      "We are all born with a large noose around our neck. He hasn't much rope left."
      Shortly thereafter Twitchell died.
      Cover-Up: Second Phase


      "Sri Darwin Gross, the Living Eck Master of Eckankar has stated that he knows
      for a fact that Paul Twitchell only had two Eck Masters during his earthly stay
      here; the Tibetan Rebazar Tarzs and Sudar Singh, and no one else. They were the
      only Masters to initiate Paul Twitchell." --Bernadine Burlin, Personal Secretary
      to Darwin Gross [16]

      "I have personally seen the name "Kirpal Singh" crossed out in the manuscript
      form of Letters to Gail. The name "Sudar Singh" was written above it. I believe
      that Gail did the editing."--Former Editor of the ECK World News [17]

      [16] Bernadine Burlin, op. cit.
      [17] David Stewart, personal telephone interview with the author in 1977. I
      should add that David Stewart was under severe pressure not to talk with me or
      see me. I remember vividly when Brother Joseph Connell, President of Moreau High
      School, and myself went to Eckankar's international headquarters for a friendly
      chat with David Stewart. Mr. Stewart was very shaken and fearful when we met him
      at the headquarters; apparently he was frightened of losing his job and being
      the subject of harassment. I never saw David Stewart again. Weeks after talking
      with me, David Stewart "resigned" from his position and went back to Texas.

      After Twitchell's demise, the cover-up concerning his involvement with Kirpal
      Singh continued unchecked. The posthumous publication of Twitchell's manuscripts
      were all thoroughly scanned. No work published after his death mentioned the
      name Kirpal Singh, even though the original manuscript, Letters to Gail, Volumes
      One and Two (a collection of letters written by Twitchell to his wife before
      their marriage in 1964), contained several references to the Ruhani Satsang
      master. For example, an excerpt from the original letter of May 30, 1963, reads:
      "Kirpal Singh used the readings from the Sikh Bible and a few from the Indian
      scriptures in his nightly meetings. . ." Yet, the revised letter replaces the
      name Kirpal Singh with "Sudar Singh" while leaving the main content of the
      letter intact. [18] It appears almost certain that the original Letters to Gail
      makes no reference to "Sudar Singh" whatsoever. Oddly, though, the present
      (revised) letters contain numerable references to him. It can be assumed that
      whenever the name "Sudar Singh" appears in Letters to Gail it is a cover name
      for Kirpal Singh, whose name appears in the original. [19]

      In the 1970's, the International Headquarters of Eckankar vehemently denied that
      their founder was ever initiated by the late Kirpal Singh, or that Twitchell
      considered the Ruhani Satsang adept a Master. In pursuance of Eckankar's
      official stand on this issue, I sent a letter of inquiry to their headquarters
      in Menlo Park. Below are excerpts of what I received:

      "Kirpal Singh and the Radha Swoami [sic] tried to "claim" Paul Twitchell and use
      him for their own purposes, as have other groups from the East and West. Paul
      mentioned this several times and at one point wrote a letter to Kirpal Singh and
      his associates stating that he, Paul, would take Singh and his associates to
      court if necessary. Due to the threats and harassment and material Kirpal Singh
      and Mr. Khanna tried to use against Paul Twitchell by faking Paul's signature on
      many papers. Paul wrote that letter that his widow, Gail Twitchell, gave me
      permission to read. . . "

      [20]
      [18] Refer to the appendices for more on this controversy of "name
      replacements."
      [19] I owe this information to David Stewart, who served as both Editor of the
      Eck World News and consulting Editor for Illuminated Way Press. He personally
      worked on the editing of Letters to Gail, enabling him to see the original,
      untampered manuscript.
      [20] Bernadine Burlin, op. cit.

      It is obvious from the above extract that Eckankar strongly denies their
      founder's involvement with Ruhani Satsang. Their position, however, on Kirpal
      Singh's alleged forging of Twitchell's signature on "many papers" is without any
      documentary basis. Neither has Darwin Gross or Gail Atkinson (also initiated by
      Kirpal Singh) adequately explained why if Twitchell was never a follower of
      Kirpal Singh did he state both in articles and in letters that he was? A
      paradigm for the whole matter comes from one of Eckankar's first
      "proto-advertisements." In 1965, a few months prior to Eckankar's official
      inception, Twitchell distributed his "Bilocation Sheet." It reads:
      PAUL TWITCHELL PRESENTS:

      New Concepts on the Ancient Teachings of Bilocation
      Paul Twitchell, author, traveler, and lecturer gives a new
      presentation of the ancient art of bilocation, out-of-body
      experiences, in a series of public lectures. . .
      He has studied under Swami Premananda, Self Realization
      Order, Washington, and Kirpal Singh to name a few. [21]

      The full impact of Ruhani Satsang and its parent Radha Soami Satsang Beas on the
      teachings of Eckankar are not fully appreciated until one understands the
      connection between the writings of Julian P. Johnson and Paul Twitchell's.
      Without a thorough understanding of Twitchell's sources, Eckankar's origins will
      remain a mystery. The one person who had undoubtedly the greatest effect on
      Twitchell's own spiritual life was Kirpal Singh of India. But the one person who
      had the most pivotal influence on Twitchell's writings was a Kentuckian--Julian
      P. Johnson.
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