Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: [EckankarSurvivorsAnonymous] Re: Fundamentalism and Religion

Expand Messages
  • etznab@aol.com
    Most of the favoritism of men over women came from Patriarchal religion replacing the earlier matriarchal beliefs, IMO. The Moon was worshipped long before
    Message 1 of 23 , Mar 10, 2009
    View Source
    • 0 Attachment
      Most of the favoritism of men over women
      came from Patriarchal religion replacing the
      earlier matriarchal beliefs, IMO.

      The Moon was worshipped long before
      Muhammad, I believe, and the moon still
      appears on certain national flags. I think
      the Moon is a feminine symbol.

      One thing men cannot do is "create life"
      (give birth). In the ancient world this would
      make women revered over men, IMO.

      My suspicion is the ascendency of men
      over women came with the age of war. Be-
      fore that, during earlier civilizations when
      the towns were unfortified, women would
      have been central to the survival of human
      society. They gave birth, raised children,
      cooked food, made clothing and baskets,
      etc. Men probably worked in the fields &
      did a lot of the things the women did, too,
      but when armies and the weapons of war
      got to be big business I suspect these over-
      powered the vocations of women and put
      men into the top positions of importance.

      Just musing about this.

      Etznab


      -----Original Message-----
      From: prometheus_973 <prometheus_973@...>
      To: EckankarSurvivorsAnonymous@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Tue, 10 Mar 2009 11:50 am
      Subject: [EckankarSurvivorsAnonymous] Re: Fundamentalism and Religion



      Hello Mishmisha,

      I agree with what you have said. Here's a

      site that has some information as to how

      and why Islamic men see women as they do.



      http://www.wikiislam.com/wiki/Qur%27an%2C_Hadith_and_Scholars:Women



      BTW- I hope this come up.



      It's interesting, too, that ECKankar denies women

      the opportunity to become LEM's (12th Initiates),

      due to "polarity" since women are "negative."

      Also, the Order of the Vairagi Adepts (pg 222

      EK Lexicon) is made up of "just men," but then

      a make-believe female Master (Kata Daki) is added

      to the "inner" ranks in order to placate the EK

      female members who do most of the work!



      Prometheus



      mish wrote:

      >

      > Jonathan,

      >

      When I stated that I was concerned and bothered by fanatics,

      fundamentalists and radicals, I was applying this to all religions.

      I think you misunderstood by comments when I pointed out that

      Islam is an antiquated religion, primitive and one as a woman

      I would not want to be associated with . . . . but there are plenty

      of zealots in various religious groups throughout this country.

      I also think it is ridiculous for people of differing faith to go as

      missionaries into foreign countries to convert . . . but many religious

      groups, including eckankar and its vahana missions, fall into this

      category as well. So I do agree that we should not be working to

      convert peoples of the world to other religions. Also democracy

      does not work everywhere either. All this government needs to say

      in order to get support for a war in the Middle East is to say our

      troops are going there to free the people, etc. LOL! But there is

      also the flip side to what our intentions are and what other zealots

      in other countries have on their agenda. A fanatic is always wanting

      to convert others . . . that is a forefront mission. And they will do

      it in various ways, including conquering and forcing their will/belief

      on others. For instance, just take a look at the history of Egypt and

      how it came to be 90% Moslem . . . I can assure you it was not nice.

      It was very bloody . . . people converted unwillingly . . . a country

      that had some of the earliest Christian churches in the world almost

      converted totally overnight . . . just how does that happen? An
      epiphany

      by the masses . . . or was it by force? And try to live there as a non-

      Moslem today . . . 10% are not Moslem. .

      >

      Now, getting back to just letting people have their religions and

      not be concerned? Well, for the most part, I guess one can. However,

      many cruel things have been done and continue to be done in the

      name of God/religion. My whole point basically is that religions

      as I said before exist to control and manipulate people, women

      usually being the most controlled and kept subservient. Religion

      to me does not afford freedom . . . so why should they have free

      range to do some of the idiotic and atrocious things they do. Why

      turn a blind eye?

      >

      I lived in the Middle East for a time. I enjoyed the association

      with many Moslems, but among them are the fanatics . . . and

      at one time, I got caught up in a disturbance which was dangerous . . .

      with my child . . . Mob mentality is really scary . . . to the point
      that

      the non violent of a faith are intimidated to keep quiet.

      >

      But we have many hard headed fundies in this country too--not

      so sure they are as violent though . . . not at this time.

      >

      I could say more but I'm not seeing the point of going too deep

      on this subject. Sam Harris' book End of Faith is an interesting

      read. I do recommend it if you haven't read it already. : )

      >

      Mish
    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.