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Re: But is it Ham Radio?

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  • n4wwc <n4wwc@qsl.net>
    ... His response suggested to me that he didn t read your post. But to add to your post But is it Ham Radio? , it would seem that some questioning Echolink
    Message 1 of 6 , Dec 10, 2002
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      --- In ECHOLINKHAMS@yahoogroups.com, "kc3mn.rm <kc3mn@a...>"
      <kc3mn@a...> wrote:
      > did you even read what i posted ????????



      His response suggested to me that he didn't read your post.

      But to add to your post 'But is it Ham Radio?', it would seem that
      some questioning Echolink being Ham Radio are using the narrow
      definition that Ham Radio is about and only about RF in total.

      Well, Echolink has lots of RF points to connect to and often times I
      use it through our repeater here. So there is more often than not RF
      on both ends.

      So it would appear to me and many others that it is Ham Radio in
      action with of course the 'Internet Propagation' bridging the gap.
      <smile>

      It's pretty cool stuff if you ask me. And brings to the table what
      I'd like to call another 'Mode of Operation'. That's all it is if
      you ask me.

      N4WWC-L #7327
      Bowling Green, KY
    • Patrick Cook, KB0OXD
      Hi everyone: I ll go even further than that. If Ham Radio continues to draw in upon itself and celebrate ONLY past glory WITHOUT giving (what COULD be) NEW
      Message 2 of 6 , Dec 10, 2002
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        Hi everyone:
         
        I'll go even further than that.
         
        If Ham Radio continues to draw in upon itself and celebrate ONLY past glory WITHOUT giving (what COULD be) NEW glory a chance (much less a try!), it WILL die a SLOW & PAINFUL death.  THAT would be THE GREATEST sorrow of all.  :-(
         
        There is, however, NOTHING wrong with celebrating past glory.  :-)
         
        Just my thoughts  :-)Cheers for now & Happy Holidays  :-)
         
        73
         
        Patrick Cook, KB0OXD
        KB0OXD CyberShack Webmaster
        Owner - EchoLink Node 19905
        pchamster@...
        Denver, Colorado  USA  Grid Square - DM79
        http://www.qsl.net/kb0oxd/
        Remember....You can visit my Ham Radio websites and PLEASE REMEMBER TO SIGN THE GUESTBOOK!!!  Otherwise, I wouldn't know if you've even been there and you wouldn't want that.....would you???  :-) *batting eyebrows*
        ----- Original Message -----
        Sent: Monday, December 09, 2002 7:03 AM
        Subject: [ECHOLINKHAMS] But is it Ham Radio?

        But is it Ham Radio?

        I hear this a lot. Of course it is ham radio. Our hobby is about
        communicating and experimenting; this system does both.
        Ham radio needs to embrace new technologies, and concentrate on those
        aspects that are unique. Let's face it.
        We must show that we can utilize the unique aspects of amateur
        radio, and merge them with existing technology to produce novel
        communications systems.
        If ham radio continues to draw in upon itself and celebrate past
        glory, it will wither and die...

        Just my thoughts.


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      • Douglas B. McKay
        I ll throw in what I wrote recently on QRZ.com as both an FYI about my system and a (semi) related note in this thread... In order to get onto the EchoLink
        Message 3 of 6 , Dec 10, 2002
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          I'll throw in what I wrote recently on QRZ.com as both an FYI about my
          system and a (semi) related note in this thread...

          In order to get onto the EchoLink system with the setup I'm running, a
          user's signal passes through at least 7 radios! The user only controls
          two of them (full control of his own, and partial control of the link),
          but someone else has set up the other 5. In this case, I have worked
          with the repeater owner (and the organization that sponsors it) to
          configure the repeater for use with EchoLink. It was fun getting into
          the guts and changing stuff around in the radio and the controller to
          learn what things worked best and so forth.

          At my home where the link radio resides, I built and setup the antenna
          (while it was snowing of course), configured the radio, built the
          interface to and configured the computer and installed the software.
          This was all very engaging for me and continues to be. I like listening
          to other people talk on the system and hearing comments once in a while
          at meetings saying that they liked listening even though I haven't heard
          them talking on the link. As I move my APRS I-Gate along with its
          associated equipment from my office to my home, I will need to make sure
          that they don't interfere with each other. I have enlisted the help of
          some local experts who have done this sort of stuff before.

          Regarding the rest of the RF linking: Although it's nearly a commodity
          these days, it was still interesting to me when I installed it. I
          didn't build the 2.4GHz antenna on my roof, but I could have. Since I
          am working with a startup Wireless ISP for my connectivity, I helped
          them install the system (up on the roof and at their office
          troubleshooting both ends of the connection). Getting sufficient DC
          power to the network bridge located 30 feet in the air across a long
          roof and down into my basement was quite an exercise. Choosing which
          link to point my 802.11b antenna at was also interesting since there was
          more than one I could have used. Maximizing the signal strength and
          signal/noise ratios while not difficult, will probably need to be done
          again in the spring as the trees in my line of sight path grow more
          microwave soaking leaves. I'll send my son up with his HT and watch the
          levels down here as we optimize the signal. From the access point I
          link to, there are two other RF connections before the signal gets onto
          copper at the local CO (which is right across the street from the last
          RF receiver).

          There are a lot of things in this system that have to be running right
          in order to have the system work. The fact that it will all go down if
          there's a local disaster is OK with me because I've designed the system
          to be supplementary. It's here as just another tool that may be
          beneficial someday, somehow. Some people are exploring ways that the
          system might be useful in an emergency. But, unless people know about
          its capabilities and limitations, it will truly be useless.
          FWIW...There will be a few people on the N2LEN system (node #6427)
          tonight (Dec 4) at 9pm EST (0400z) discussing the possibilities.

          I still use other more traditional methods to communicate as well
          (anything from mirror signaling to sign language), but I have very much
          enjoyed myself in this particular corner of Amateur Radio.

          ...Doug KD7LRJ
          Lindon, Utah
          Net Manager, Utah County ARES
          Operator node #46049
          24/7 EchoLinked to N7BSA repeater

          -----Original Message-----
          From: n4wwc <n4wwc@...> [mailto:n4wwc@...]
          Sent: Tuesday, December 10, 2002 4:12 AM
          To: ECHOLINKHAMS@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: [ECHOLINKHAMS] Re: But is it Ham Radio?
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