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plants

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  • Michael obrien
    As you travel up Glendale Boulevard, be sure to note the Purple Trumpet Vine (Clytostema callistegioides) growing on the fence at St. Theresa s. This is a nice
    Message 1 of 17 , Apr 29 5:57 PM
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      As you travel up Glendale Boulevard, be sure to note the Purple Trumpet Vine (Clytostema callistegioides) growing on the fence at St. Theresa's. This is a nice small scale vine appropriate for the average residential lot, and will cover that unsightly fence or anything else you don't want to see. It's fairly drought tolerant, and unusual for a flowering vine, will tolerate some shade. Purple?--well, it's actually lavender, but I am not responsible for common names.

      As you travel down Morton Place into Elysian Park, you will notice a dark tree on the south covered with bunches of small white flowers. That's the Black Acacia, Acacia melanoxylon. This tree is quite drought tolerant, and is a good choice for narrow spaces, so long as you don't mind it growing tall. But it does tend to be invasive, so it needs watching.
       
      Michael O'Brien
    • ckruzan25
      Michael, what are the trees with the big yellow balls of flowers that are blooming like crazy right now?
      Message 2 of 17 , Jul 4, 2013
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        Michael, what are the trees with the big yellow balls of flowers that are blooming like crazy right now?




        --- In EchoElysianNCForum@yahoogroups.com, Michael obrien <mobla26@...> wrote:
        >
        > The two new trees at the bus stop at Echo Park and Sunset are Chinese Pistache, Pistacia chinensis. No, these trees do not bear pistachios--that's another species. These are deciduous trees that are known for their brilliant red fall color, unusual in L.A. They way they were grown, with their central leader cut out, is bad growing practice, since they will never reach their ultimate height, but in this case it's probably good since they will not grow tall enough to interfere with the overhead power lines. They should also have their lower limbs still on the tree (you can see a good example with the Ginkgos at Kaiser on Sunset), since trees grow better when their trunks are shaded, but this is standard nursery practice, to grow a ball on a stick. People ask for larger trees to be planted. Actually, the smaller the tree that you plant, the better it will adapt to its situation and the faster it will eventually grow.
        >
        > In the Arboretum, at Stadium Way and Morton, you can see our Rhodanthema rhodosphaera (no common name) flowering right now.
        >
        > In the hills, you can see large glossy-leaved shrubs with white flower clusters at the branch ends. Those are the Mexican Elderberry, Sambucus mexicana. The flower clusters turn into bunches of shiny blue-black berries, which the birds love.
        >
        > It's also time for the hills to turn golden yellow with mustard plants (Brasica nigra and Hirschfeldtia incana.) They are pretty, but they are invasive plants which germinate early in the spring and suck up the moisture so the native plants can't sprout. You can uses the YOUNG leaves of these plants as spicy mustard greens in your salads, although if they are by the trails, don't use any leaves lower than 3' from the ground--dogs may have passed by.
        >  
        > Michael O'Brien
        >
      • Michael obrien
        those would be Gold Medallion Trees, Cassia leptophylla.   Michael O Brien ... those would be Gold Medallion Trees, Cassia leptophylla. Michael O Brien From:
        Message 3 of 17 , Jul 4, 2013
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          those would be Gold Medallion Trees, Cassia leptophylla.
           
          Michael O'Brien

          From: ckruzan25 <clkruzan@...>
          To: EchoElysianNCForum@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Thursday, July 4, 2013 11:30 AM
          Subject: [EchoElysianNCForum] Re: plants

           
          Michael, what are the trees with the big yellow balls of flowers that are blooming like crazy right now?

          --- In EchoElysianNCForum@yahoogroups.com, Michael obrien <mobla26@...> wrote:
          >
          > The two new trees at the bus stop at Echo Park and Sunset are Chinese Pistache, Pistacia chinensis. No, these trees do not bear pistachios--that's another species. These are deciduous trees that are known for their brilliant red fall color, unusual in L.A. They way they were grown, with their central leader cut out, is bad growing practice, since they will never reach their ultimate height, but in this case it's probably good since they will not grow tall enough to interfere with the overhead power lines. They should also have their lower limbs still on the tree (you can see a good example with the Ginkgos at Kaiser on Sunset), since trees grow better when their trunks are shaded, but this is standard nursery practice, to grow a ball on a stick. People ask for larger trees to be planted. Actually, the smaller the tree that you plant, the better it will adapt to its situation and the faster it will eventually grow.
          >
          > In the Arboretum, at Stadium Way and Morton, you can see our Rhodanthema rhodosphaera (no common name) flowering right now.
          >
          > In the hills, you can see large glossy-leaved shrubs with white flower clusters at the branch ends. Those are the Mexican Elderberry, Sambucus mexicana. The flower clusters turn into bunches of shiny blue-black berries, which the birds love.
          >
          > It's also time for the hills to turn golden yellow with mustard plants (Brasica nigra and Hirschfeldtia incana.) They are pretty, but they are invasive plants which germinate early in the spring and suck up the moisture so the native plants can't sprout. You can uses the YOUNG leaves of these plants as spicy mustard greens in your salads, although if they are by the trails, don't use any leaves lower than 3' from the ground--dogs may have passed by.
          >  
          > Michael O'Brien
          >



        • ckruzan25
          Thank you!
          Message 4 of 17 , Jul 4, 2013
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            Thank you!

            --- In EchoElysianNCForum@yahoogroups.com, Michael obrien <mobla26@...> wrote:
            >
            > those would be Gold Medallion Trees, Cassia leptophylla.
            >  
            > Michael O'Brien
            >
            >
            > >________________________________
            > > From: ckruzan25 <clkruzan@...>
            > >To: EchoElysianNCForum@yahoogroups.com
            > >Sent: Thursday, July 4, 2013 11:30 AM
            > >Subject: [EchoElysianNCForum] Re: plants
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > > 
            > >Michael, what are the trees with the big yellow balls of flowers that are blooming like crazy right now?
            > >
            > >--- In EchoElysianNCForum@yahoogroups.com, Michael obrien <mobla26@> wrote:
            > >>
            > >> The two new trees at the bus stop at Echo Park and Sunset are Chinese Pistache, Pistacia chinensis. No, these trees do not bear pistachios--that's another species. These are deciduous trees that are known for their brilliant red fall color, unusual in L.A. They way they were grown, with their central leader cut out, is bad growing practice, since they will never reach their ultimate height, but in this case it's probably good since they will not grow tall enough to interfere with the overhead power lines. They should also have their lower limbs still on the tree (you can see a good example with the Ginkgos at Kaiser on Sunset), since trees grow better when their trunks are shaded, but this is standard nursery practice, to grow a ball on a stick. People ask for larger trees to be planted. Actually, the smaller the tree that you plant, the better it will adapt to its situation and the faster it will eventually grow.
            > >>
            > >> In the Arboretum, at Stadium Way and Morton, you can see our Rhodanthema rhodosphaera (no common name) flowering right now.
            > >>
            > >> In the hills, you can see large glossy-leaved shrubs with white flower clusters at the branch ends. Those are the Mexican Elderberry, Sambucus mexicana. The flower clusters turn into bunches of shiny blue-black berries, which the birds love.
            > >>
            > >> It's also time for the hills to turn golden yellow with mustard plants (Brasica nigra and Hirschfeldtia incana.) They are pretty, but they are invasive plants which germinate early in the spring and suck up the moisture so the native plants can't sprout. You can uses the YOUNG leaves of these plants as spicy mustard greens in your salads, although if they are by the trails, don't use any leaves lower than 3' from the ground--dogs may have passed by.
            > >>  
            > >> Michael O'Brien
            > >>
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            >
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