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  • Sanjay
    I will add my introduction to the list. I just heard about this list and registered today and it seems like it has the potential to be a fertile ground for
    Message 1 of 8 , Mar 28, 2000
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      I will add my introduction to the list. I just heard about this list
      and registered today and it seems like it has the potential to be a
      fertile ground for exchanging ideas. If nothing else, maybe we'll
      feel better knowing there are others out there struggling to learn
      (while at the same enjoying the struggle) one of these "quantitative
      social sciences."

      My name is Sanjay Chugh, and I'm a first-year Ph.D. student in
      economics at the University of Pennsylvania. Yes, it has been quite
      a struggle all year just to keep up - and yes, it's the intense
      mathematics which makes it so difficult. And to the person who asked
      if she could handle both a full-time job AND going to econ grad
      school (sorry, I've forgotten who that was right now) - that seems
      impossibly ambitious. I guess I should only speak for myself, but
      econ grad school IS a full-time job. I easily study 45-55 hours per
      week - and that does not count the 15 or so hours of classroom time
      per week.

      I won't go into all my interests in econ etc. just yet - unless there
      arises a demand for it. :) Instead, I'll leave with my
      economics/social science thought of the day (Maybe I can turn that
      into a regular feature? Again, I suppose I will consider demand - or
      anti-demand as the case may be....):

      Why is everything in economics so linear?

      Not that I even understand how to solve all these linear models - but
      don't we really need to consider more nonlinear models?

      Well, I hope to have a meaningful discourse with you all. In the
      meantime, take care,

      Sanjay
    • Paul Armstrong-Taylor
      Hello, I am a first year student on the Economics PhD here at Harvard. I was fortunate to have taken a MPhil in Cambridge (UK) before I came here so I tested
      Message 2 of 8 , Mar 28, 2000
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        Hello,

        I am a first year student on the Economics PhD here at Harvard.

        I was fortunate to have taken a MPhil in Cambridge (UK) before I came here
        so I tested out of the core first year stuff and am having great fun
        messing around with field courses. I have even found time to take a
        Chinese language course and and MBA course over at HBS. I am, somewhat
        optimistically, trying to get the latter to count towards the Departments
        economics distribution requirement (which is normally satisfied by an
        economic history course). Apparently my petition raised "new and
        interesting questions about the scope of the requirement". I haven't been
        here long enough to know if that is Harvard code for "you have got to be
        ******* joking"! We will see.

        I guess the maths can be tough at first if you have done a non-technical
        undergraduate economics course. However, if you keep in mind the
        intuition and avoid getting dazed, you will be OK. And it gets easier the
        more you do (obviously!).

        Anyway, back to my MBA business plan!?

        See you guys,

        Paul
      • David J. Falls
        ... hi sanjay - i wouldn t complain about linearity (sp?) if i were you - i think the only reason anybody studies linear models is because nonlinear is too
        Message 3 of 8 , Mar 28, 2000
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          >
          > Why is everything in economics so linear?
          >
          > Not that I even understand how to solve all these linear models - but
          > don't we really need to consider more nonlinear models?

          hi sanjay - i wouldn't complain about linearity (sp?) if i were you - i
          think the only reason anybody studies linear models is because nonlinear
          is too hard ;) but it seems to me (i introduced myself to the list
          before - but in case you missed it, i am a first year grad student
          studying (discrete) mathematics, that nonlinear is the way to go if you
          want to model any sort of of "interesting" economy (my econ background is
          VERY weak, so maybe i'm wrong, but i think predicting economics and
          predicting the weather fall into the same class of problems - and they
          are both chaotic (due to non-linearity, i think). i heard a story about
          an economist who claimed to have perfectly modelled the world economy - it
          was a system of thousands of differential equations that seemed to
          accurately predict the world's economy (sorry i can't be more specific)
          but - he was fired when, after a closer look at his work, the "thousands
          of equations" were all of the form f'(x) = k, k being a constant updated
          daily. haha.

          anyways - is anyone on this list interested in mathematics? i am
          studying coding theory and cryptography right now - and i think i have
          come up with new "approach" for Galois theory if anyone is interested in
          that sort of thing. -dave
        • Elvin Wong
          Hi Sanjay, Given continuity (right?), in a small enough interval, it is linear. Funny huh? Actually they are making it easier for you by studying the linear
          Message 4 of 8 , Mar 28, 2000
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            Hi Sanjay,

            Given continuity (right?), in a small enough interval, it is linear.

            Funny huh?

            Actually they are making it easier for you by studying the linear case.

            Like all simplifying assumptions, it permits us to start an analysis w/o all
            the gory details.

            Elvin
            -----Original Message-----
            From: Sanjay <skchugh@...>
            To: EcFinMatStGradSchool@onelist.com <EcFinMatStGradSchool@onelist.com>
            Date: Tuesday, March 28, 2000 9:03 PM
            Subject: Hello


            >From: "Sanjay " <skchugh@...>
            >
            >I will add my introduction to the list. I just heard about this list
            >and registered today and it seems like it has the potential to be a
            >fertile ground for exchanging ideas. If nothing else, maybe we'll
            >feel better knowing there are others out there struggling to learn
            >(while at the same enjoying the struggle) one of these "quantitative
            >social sciences."
            >
            >My name is Sanjay Chugh, and I'm a first-year Ph.D. student in
            >economics at the University of Pennsylvania. Yes, it has been quite
            >a struggle all year just to keep up - and yes, it's the intense
            >mathematics which makes it so difficult. And to the person who asked
            >if she could handle both a full-time job AND going to econ grad
            >school (sorry, I've forgotten who that was right now) - that seems
            >impossibly ambitious. I guess I should only speak for myself, but
            >econ grad school IS a full-time job. I easily study 45-55 hours per
            >week - and that does not count the 15 or so hours of classroom time
            >per week.
            >
            >I won't go into all my interests in econ etc. just yet - unless there
            >arises a demand for it. :) Instead, I'll leave with my
            >economics/social science thought of the day (Maybe I can turn that
            >into a regular feature? Again, I suppose I will consider demand - or
            >anti-demand as the case may be....):
            >
            > Why is everything in economics so linear?
            >
            >Not that I even understand how to solve all these linear models - but
            >don't we really need to consider more nonlinear models?
            >
            >Well, I hope to have a meaningful discourse with you all. In the
            >meantime, take care,
            >
            >Sanjay
            >
            >
            >
            >
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            >
            >
            >

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          • Elvin Wong
            Really? Elvin ... From: David J. Falls To: EcFinMatStGradSchool@onelist.com Date: Tuesday, March 28, 2000
            Message 5 of 8 , Mar 28, 2000
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              Really?

              Elvin
              -----Original Message-----
              From: David J. Falls <djfalls@...>
              To: EcFinMatStGradSchool@onelist.com <EcFinMatStGradSchool@onelist.com>
              Date: Tuesday, March 28, 2000 9:47 PM
              Subject: Re: Hello


              >From: "David J. Falls" <djfalls@...>
              >
              >>
              >> Why is everything in economics so linear?
              >>
              >> Not that I even understand how to solve all these linear models - but
              >> don't we really need to consider more nonlinear models?
              >
              >hi sanjay - i wouldn't complain about linearity (sp?) if i were you - i
              >think the only reason anybody studies linear models is because nonlinear
              >is too hard ;) but it seems to me (i introduced myself to the list
              >before - but in case you missed it, i am a first year grad student
              >studying (discrete) mathematics, that nonlinear is the way to go if you
              >want to model any sort of of "interesting" economy (my econ background is
              >VERY weak, so maybe i'm wrong, but i think predicting economics and
              >predicting the weather fall into the same class of problems - and they
              >are both chaotic (due to non-linearity, i think). i heard a story about
              >an economist who claimed to have perfectly modelled the world economy - it
              >was a system of thousands of differential equations that seemed to
              >accurately predict the world's economy (sorry i can't be more specific)
              >but - he was fired when, after a closer look at his work, the "thousands
              >of equations" were all of the form f'(x) = k, k being a constant updated
              >daily. haha.
              >
              > anyways - is anyone on this list interested in mathematics? i am
              >studying coding theory and cryptography right now - and i think i have
              >come up with new "approach" for Galois theory if anyone is interested in
              >that sort of thing. -dave
              >
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              >Get automatic protection and access to your important computer files.
              >Install today:
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              >
              >To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
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              >
              >
              >
              >

              _____________________________________________
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            • Elvin Wong
              Hi Paul, Harvard s answer is just an attempt to emulate the British-ness they wish they had. What did you use for the M.Phil courses at Cambridge? What do they
              Message 6 of 8 , Mar 28, 2000
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                Hi Paul,

                Harvard's answer is just an attempt to emulate the British-ness they wish
                they had.

                What did you use for the M.Phil courses at Cambridge?

                What do they use at Harvard the first year?

                What do you intend to specialize in?

                By the way, the MBA course is a good idea in general, keeps the econ
                grounded, or should.

                Elvin


                -----Original Message-----
                From: Paul Armstrong-Taylor <armstr2@...>
                To: EcFinMatStGradSchool@onelist.com <EcFinMatStGradSchool@onelist.com>
                Date: Tuesday, March 28, 2000 9:39 PM
                Subject: Hello


                >From: Paul Armstrong-Taylor <armstr2@...>
                >
                >Hello,
                >
                >I am a first year student on the Economics PhD here at Harvard.
                >
                >I was fortunate to have taken a MPhil in Cambridge (UK) before I came here
                >so I tested out of the core first year stuff and am having great fun
                >messing around with field courses. I have even found time to take a
                >Chinese language course and and MBA course over at HBS. I am, somewhat
                >optimistically, trying to get the latter to count towards the Departments
                >economics distribution requirement (which is normally satisfied by an
                >economic history course). Apparently my petition raised "new and
                >interesting questions about the scope of the requirement". I haven't been
                >here long enough to know if that is Harvard code for "you have got to be
                >******* joking"! We will see.
                >
                >I guess the maths can be tough at first if you have done a non-technical
                >undergraduate economics course. However, if you keep in mind the
                >intuition and avoid getting dazed, you will be OK. And it gets easier the
                >more you do (obviously!).
                >
                >Anyway, back to my MBA business plan!?
                >
                >See you guys,
                >
                >Paul
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
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                >To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
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                >
                >
                >
                >

                _____________________________________________
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              • Paul Armstrong-Taylor
                Hi Elvin, ... I don t dislike it, I just found it a little amusing (maybe I am just hardened to it form Cambridge). I still think I have a shot (but that is
                Message 7 of 8 , Mar 28, 2000
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                  Hi Elvin,

                  > Harvard's answer is just an attempt to emulate the British-ness they wish
                  > they had.
                  I don't dislike it, I just found it a little amusing (maybe I am just
                  hardened to it form Cambridge). I still think I have a shot (but that is
                  very probably an irrational expectation!).

                  > What did you use for the M.Phil courses at Cambridge?
                  I'm not quite sure what you mean. For textbooks:

                  Micro: mainly Mas-Colell, Whinston and Green (like everywhere else I know
                  except Chicago) + some other stuff - especially game theory

                  Macro: no textbook - but we covered all the usual stuff Solow, Ramsey and
                  endogenous growth models, consumption, investment, public finance, etc (I
                  consider macroeconomics one step up from witchdoctory, so i have forgotten
                  most of it). In terms of techniques - the core sourse just covered stuff
                  like dynamic optimisation (non-stochastic/stochastic), phase diagrams,
                  etc.

                  Econometrics: Very biased towards time series (it was taught by Professor
                  Andrew Harvey who is a time series guy). We used his book and also, but
                  to a much lesser extent, the standard reference of Greene.

                  Those were the core courses. I did some really cool stuff on game theory
                  and OLG in a theory option. The latter part was taught by Polemarchakis
                  who was visiting and is very sharp.

                  > What do they use at Harvard the first year?
                  Micro: MWG of course (it was written here). From what I here from the
                  other first years (I am not in the class) it is followed a little too
                  slavishly.

                  Macro: Barro does growth out of his book with Sala-i-Martin
                  Mankiw: does a selection of stuff (but he always asks a consumption
                  question on the exam)
                  Friedman: (who is comfortably the least popular lecturer) does dynamic
                  inconsistency, inflation targetting etc
                  Alesina: does political economy stuff
                  Last year Laibson did a lot of stuff on dynamic optimisation (Bellman
                  equation, Ito's lemma) and hyperbolic discounting.

                  Econometrics: It depends on the course you take. Jorgenson does a general
                  course on Greene type material. Chamberlain does a course focused on
                  Bayesian techniques and panel data

                  > What do you intend to specialize in?
                  Contract theory, theory of organisations, corporate finance. Sort of in
                  the Oliver Hart and Philippe Aghion (who is coming next year) area. I
                  also have a passing interest in game theory.

                  > By the way, the MBA course is a good idea in general, keeps the econ
                  > grounded, or should.
                  Well that was the point of my petition. Not sure I believe it though. :)
                  In any case it is great fun.

                  Paul
                • triyakshana@yahoo.com
                  hi guys, Iam a post graduate student of Econometrics at an Indian University. I feel the course content is heavily outdated here and wish to update myself. Can
                  Message 8 of 8 , Sep 29, 2000
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                    hi guys,
                    Iam a post graduate student of Econometrics at an Indian University.
                    I feel the course content is heavily outdated here and wish to update
                    myself. Can you tell me where I can tell me the current software
                    thats being used in this field.

                    cheers
                    triya
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