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bellows pattern

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  • thoravolundsdottir
    Hi Everyone I am looking for a pattern for the round style bellows, it sits beside or under the forge and is a cylinder shape instead of the typical tear drop
    Message 1 of 4 , Feb 12, 2012
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      Hi Everyone

      I am looking for a pattern for the round style bellows, it sits beside or under the forge and is a cylinder shape instead of the typical tear drop style. I was wondering if anyone has heard of or does have a pattern for this type of bellows.

      Thanks in advance

      Lady Thora
    • Sam Falzone
      Hi Thora. I know the bellows you re talking about. I ve never come across any plans for them, but folks on the forums I m on have all said that they were very
      Message 2 of 4 , Feb 12, 2012
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        Hi Thora.

        I know the bellows you’re talking about.  I’ve never come across any plans for them, but folks on the forums I’m on have all said that they were very tricky to build, a pain to maintain and generally not very efficient.  Why this particular style instead of the old tear-drop style? – if you don’t mind me asking.

        aeneas

         

        From: EaldormereBlacksmithguild@yahoogroups.com [mailto:EaldormereBlacksmithguild@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of thoravolundsdottir
        Sent: February-12-12 11:20 AM
        To: EaldormereBlacksmithguild@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [EaldormereBlacksmithguild] bellows pattern

         

         

        Hi Everyone

        I am looking for a pattern for the round style bellows, it sits beside or under the forge and is a cylinder shape instead of the typical tear drop style. I was wondering if anyone has heard of or does have a pattern for this type of bellows.

        Thanks in advance

        Lady Thora


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      • Darrell Markewitz
        Thora (et All) I ve got a couple of images (someplace) of a reconstruction I saw at Military through the Ages at Jamestown some years back. The fellow had a
        Message 3 of 4 , Feb 13, 2012
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          Thora (et All)

          I've got a couple of images (someplace) of a reconstruction I saw at
          Military through the Ages at Jamestown some years back. The fellow had a
          unit as you describe, with accordion bellows mounted below the fire box.
          The wooden frame was roughly three x three feet, and set with two large
          wheels offset to one end. With two extended handles, the forge then
          could be easily pushed along like a small cart. He had the piping set up
          so he could switch between side blast (for charcoal) or bottom blast
          (for coal).
          I had talked to him about it, he said it was based on a pre
          Revolutionary War (American) design.
          That time point might be some help.
          Let me see if I can find the images

          I can see the linkages from the bellows handle to the bellows being
          the mechanical challenge in the design. The bottom plate of the
          accordion was the piece that moved - I remember it being a double
          chamber system.
          Check and see if you can find the episode of 'Victorian Farm' (or check
          their web site?) that covered the re-build forge. They were using a late
          Victorian static mounted accordion bellows (had a cast iron frame).

          Sam - the advantage is the size. The whole system fits into a
          rectangular shape - which then is easy to mount for portable use.
          Historically accurate for those wanting to work in the 1700's.

          Darrell

          http://www.writeopinions.com/traveling-forge

          (A curious thing I was finding on Google images - the more tightly I
          defined the search, the farther from the intended target I got!)
          --
          ****************************************

          Darrell Markewitz - Artisan Blacksmith
          the Wareham Forge - Historic Reproductions & Architectural Forgings
          <http://www.warehamforge.ca>
          Interpretive Program Design - Norse Replicas / Viking Age Equipment
          <http://www.warehamforge.ca/NORSE-REPRO/norse.html>

          Blog : Hammered Out Bits

          Author of:
          Introduction to Blacksmithing (DVD)
          Historic Bladesmithing (DVD)
          Forging the Viking Age (DVD)
          Experimental Iron Smelting from the Viking Age (CD-ROM)
          Exploring the Viking Age in Denmark (data DVD)
          all available at http://www.warehamforge.ca/video.html

          All materials created by Darrell Markewitz copyrighted the author.
          http://www.warehamforge.ca/copy.html
        • Sam Falzone
          Oh don t get me wrong - I realize the size advantage in the design (one image I saw of that kind of bellows was on a circular rivetter s forge, so the whole
          Message 4 of 4 , Feb 13, 2012
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            Oh don't get me wrong - I realize the size advantage in the design (one image I saw of that kind of bellows was on a circular rivetter's forge, so the whole thing was this neat package with the bellows under the firepan). 
             
            The only images I've been able to find of portable forges for around 1700's to 1812 were on military forge wagons, but all the ones I've seen used the tear-drop style double chamber bellows.
             
            It's interesting that the one you mention you saw was at an American site - the only ones I've seen were from England - but of course pre-Revolutionary war, English designed bellows would have been commonly found in the States.
             
            Thora, I have the series Victorian Farm on DVD but I don't know how I could get it to you.  I could try to burn you a copy and mail it to you ...
             
            Sam

             
            On Mon, Feb 13, 2012 at 8:37 AM, Darrell Markewitz <wareham@...> wrote:
             

            Thora (et All)

            I've got a couple of images (someplace) of a reconstruction I saw at
            Military through the Ages at Jamestown some years back. The fellow had a
            unit as you describe, with accordion bellows mounted below the fire box.
            The wooden frame was roughly three x three feet, and set with two large
            wheels offset to one end. With two extended handles, the forge then
            could be easily pushed along like a small cart. He had the piping set up
            so he could switch between side blast (for charcoal) or bottom blast
            (for coal).
            I had talked to him about it, he said it was based on a pre
            Revolutionary War (American) design.
            That time point might be some help.
            Let me see if I can find the images

            I can see the linkages from the bellows handle to the bellows being
            the mechanical challenge in the design. The bottom plate of the
            accordion was the piece that moved - I remember it being a double
            chamber system.
            Check and see if you can find the episode of 'Victorian Farm' (or check
            their web site?) that covered the re-build forge. They were using a late
            Victorian static mounted accordion bellows (had a cast iron frame).

            Sam - the advantage is the size. The whole system fits into a
            rectangular shape - which then is easy to mount for portable use.
            Historically accurate for those wanting to work in the 1700's.

            Darrell

            http://www.writeopinions.com/traveling-forge

            (A curious thing I was finding on Google images - the more tightly I
            defined the search, the farther from the intended target I got!)
            --
            ****************************************

            Darrell Markewitz - Artisan Blacksmith
            the Wareham Forge - Historic Reproductions & Architectural Forgings
            <http://www.warehamforge.ca>
            Interpretive Program Design - Norse Replicas / Viking Age Equipment
            <http://www.warehamforge.ca/NORSE-REPRO/norse.html>

            Blog : Hammered Out Bits

            Author of:
            Introduction to Blacksmithing (DVD)
            Historic Bladesmithing (DVD)
            Forging the Viking Age (DVD)
            Experimental Iron Smelting from the Viking Age (CD-ROM)
            Exploring the Viking Age in Denmark (data DVD)
            all available at http://www.warehamforge.ca/video.html

            All materials created by Darrell Markewitz copyrighted the author.
            http://www.warehamforge.ca/copy.html




            --
            _______________________________________________________
            Strive for greatness in all that you do, for life is too short to be a hack.
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