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107Re: [EaldormereBlacksmithguild] Re: Monthly question

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  • Helmut's Forge
    Aug 6, 2011
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      I have always preffered anhydrous borax without metal filer for this type of welding.
      Helmut

      On Sat, Aug 6, 2011 at 5:48 PM, Aurik <rockforge@...> wrote:
       

      Very detailed process, Breneth.

      For the welding compound, will straight borax do the trick or will a borax / metal filling mix work better?

      Aurik



      --- In EaldormereBlacksmithguild@yahoogroups.com, "dblacksmith23" <drobertson@...> wrote:
      >
      >
      >
      > > Question: What is the best way to forge weld braided wire?
      >
      > By braided wire I am assuming that you mean cable such as is used by wreckers or cranes.
      >
      > The first is to determine if it was from an elevator. This type of cable is counter rotating. That is that the inner strands are twisted in the opposite direction from the outer strands. If you heat this type of cable and try to twist it tighter the inner strands cause it to force apart.
      >
      > It can still be welded but don't twist it tight. Start with standard cable as it is easier.
      >
      > Regular cable from cranes or wreckers etc. has inner and outer strands twisted in the same direction. This allows you to take a heat and clamp one end in a vise and twist the other end with vise grips or pipe wrench tight to help remove as much of the air space as possible.
      >
      > The good news is this alloy welds very easily although the technique is a bit different from normal forge welding.
      >
      > Once the cable is twisted tight take a general bright orange heat and scrub as much scale off as possible with a fine wire brush. Do this gently to not untwist what you have previously done.
      >
      > Flux with 20 MuleTeam Borax or similar. Let the flux melt into all the cracks and crevices. It should wick its way deep into the structure of the cable.
      >
      > Back to the fire and take to a welding heat. Lemon yellow in a gas forge, well below sparks in a coal forge. For the next step you will need a bottom tool. A swage block is ideal but you can get away with a couple sizes of angle iron welded and supported on a bar that fits the hardy hole of the anvil. The point here is to create a tool that support the bottom of the cable (either 90 degrees V block as the angle iron or half rounds as is found in many swage blocks)
      >
      > The different sizes will allow you to adjust to the right size as the cable/bar shrinks or compacts as it is welded.
      >
      > So having your swage tool ready bring out the cable and start the weld at the far end with light but firm hammer taps. Now the important part. Rotate the cable as you go so that each hammer tap is tightening the cable as you weld.
      >
      > At first it will be sort of squishy or floppy but once the weld takes it will become a solid bar and you will hear the sound change. Once it is solid just treat it as a solid bar and you can do further welds or refinement on the anvil surface.
      >
      > Repeat overlapping your welds as you go until you reach the length that you wish.
      >
      > I hope this helps.
      > Breneth
      > Artist Blacksmith
      > http://www.artistblacksmith.com
      >


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